LISTEN: Operation Song Memorial Day Special

WUTC 88.1 FM has created a program featuring segments from Operation Song, a Nashville-based nonprofit organization that empowers veterans, active duty military and their families to tell their stories through songwriting. The Operation Song Memorial Day Special is an hour of music and interviews about unforgettable experiences on the battlefield and back home. Several veterans collaborated with hit songwriters to create the music.
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In the misty rain, surrounded by Rio de Janeiro's green hills, police officer Eduardo Dias was buried last week. He was shot, purportedly by gang members, as he was leaving his post inside the favela, or shantytown, where he worked as a community cop.

The killing took place a few hundred feet from the Maracana Stadium, where the opening ceremony of the Summer Olympics will be held on Aug. 5. As family members wept by the graveside, the pastor raised his hands.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Call Me Professor Jolie Pitt: The Buzz About Her New Job

47 minutes ago

Model. Actress. Oscar winner. Activist. Director. U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees special envoy. And now professor?

Last week, Angelina Jolie Pitt was appointed as a visiting professor at the London School of Economics' new masters program on women, peace and security. It's created a substantial debate among academics in the global development community: Are celebrity professors effective?

Former Attorney General Eric Holder says Edward Snowden's leak was "inappropriate and illegal" but "I think that he actually performed a public service by raising the debate that we engaged in and by the changes that we made."

Holder, who was attorney general when Snowden leaked highly sensitive documents that detailed some of the work of the National Security Agency, made the comments in an interview with former Obama adviser David Axelrod.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

The last time, we heard about a "mysterious hemorrhagic fever" in a country, it was February 2014. The outbreak was in Guinea. And by the time doctors had pinpointed the culprit, Ebola was spiraling out of control in West Africa.

The situation in South Sudan today is a far cry from that in West Africa a few years ago. But it's still concerning, the World Health Organization said.

Science writer Mary Roach is not easily repulsed. While researching her latest book, Grunt, Roach learned all about the medicinal use of maggots in World War I. She also purposely sniffed a putrid scent known as "Who me?" that was developed as an experimental weapon during World War II.

For Roach, it's all in the name of research. "I'm kind of the bottom-feeder of science writing," Roach jokes to Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "I'm just someone who is OK with being very out there with my curiosity."

The Supreme Court took action in two capital cases Tuesday, with dissenting justices from the right and left pricking their colleagues in dissent.

In one, the court ordered the resentencing of a convicted Arizona killer because the jury was not told that if he were sentenced to life in prison, there was no chance he would be paroled. And in the other, the court declined to hear a broad constitutional challenge to the death penalty.

Majd Abdulghani is a young woman from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, who dreams of becoming a scientist — while her parents hope to arrange her marriage. Radio Diaries, a storytelling nonprofit and podcast, sent Abdulghani a recorder — and she ended up chronicling her world for over two years. Here are some scenes from her diary, which began on October 31, 2013.

Meet The Abdulghanis

Hello. This is Majd and I turned 19 today.

Ring ring ring!

That's my alarm. It thinks I'm asleep.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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