4:59pm

Thu April 25, 2013
Around the Nation

Making Room: Can Smaller Apartments Help New York City Grow?

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 8:16 pm

Some housing experts say New York's zoning code has discouraged the building of affordable housing by requiring that all apartments be at least 400 square feet. The city is interested in finding ways to rewrite the rules.
iStockphoto.com

New York City is notoriously crowded, and it's only getting more so. The city estimates it will have 1 million more people by the year 2030, many of them single. Where to place all these newcomers is a major challenge.

Mayor Mike Bloomberg has announced plans to put up an experimental building of micro-apartments that could be replicated throughout the city. And the Museum of the City of New York is looking at ways to make better use of the city's housing stock.

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4:59pm

Thu April 25, 2013
Around the Nation

Mississippi River's Many 'Parents' Look To Unify

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 8:16 pm

Mississippi River floodwaters in Vicksburg, Miss., in 2011.
Dave Martin AP

Life on the Mississippi River is a roller coaster of highs and lows: record high floodwaters one year, a drought and near-record low water levels the next. And those are just two of the many problems faced by river stakeholders like barge operators, farmers and conservation groups.

Those stakeholders met recently in Chicago to discuss the Mississippi's most pressing needs, any common ground, and how to speak with a unified voice in advocating for the nation's largest river system.

So far, that hasn't been easy.

Critical, Crumbling Lifeline

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4:59pm

Thu April 25, 2013
It's All Politics

Max Baucus Says He Was Montana's 'Hired Hand' On Gun Vote

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 8:16 pm

Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., is trailed by reporters Monday on Capitol Hill after announcing that he'll retire in 2014.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Longtime Democratic Sen. Max Baucus of Montana announced this week that he would not seek re-election next year, ending four decades in Congress and leaving as chairman of the powerful Senate Finance Committee.

NPR's Robert Siegel spoke with Baucus Thursday about his recent vote against expanded gun background checks, his role in negotiations over President Obama's health care legislation, efforts to remake tax policy, and the legions of his former staffers now populating lobbying shops.

Background Checks

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4:58pm

Thu April 25, 2013
The Salt

Monkeys Also Want To Eat Like The Locals

The blue corn's just as tasty as the red corn, but it's not what the locals like.
Erica van de Waal Science

When you travel, do you want to drink Bellinis in Venice and yak butter tea in Tibet? Well, so do monkeys.

Monkeys will eat new, different food if they travel to a new place and want to fit in with the locals, according to a new study. But back home, they'll eat what Mama eats, shunning perfectly good food if it doesn't get her approval.

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3:01pm

Thu April 25, 2013
The Two-Way

Still In The Middle Class, But Standing On A Banana Peel

Most U.S. workers fit snugly into the middle class, but they worry a lot about falling out of it, according to a poll released Thursday.

After years of watching home prices slide and job creation stall, 6 in 10 Americans say they fear tumbling from the middle class in the next few years, the Allstate-National Journal Heartland Monitor Poll suggests.

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2:49pm

Thu April 25, 2013
The Two-Way

Have You Seen Me? Giant Styrofoam Head Found

A floating head was discovered by the Marist College men's crew team this week in the Hudson River.
Tyler Sawyer, Marist College Facebook

Crew members from Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., were out practicing on the Hudson River this week when they were surprised by a gigantic head floating toward them.

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2:04pm

Thu April 25, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why Finding A TB Test Got Hard

The skin test for tuberculosis sparks an itchy welt in people who have been exposed to the bacillus.
Greg Knobloch CDC

Hospitals and public health departments around the country are having a tough time coming up with a staple of preventive health care: the skin test for tuberculosis.

The shortage, caused by problems at a factory in Canada, is prompting suspension of routine TB testing around the country.

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1:58pm

Thu April 25, 2013
The Two-Way

Body Is ID'd As Missing Student Falsely Linked To Bombings

Sunil Tripathi.
Facebook.com

A body pulled out of the water earlier this week in Providence, R.I., has now been identified as that of 22-year-old Sunil Tripathi, a Brown University student who had been missing since March 15.

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1:46pm

Thu April 25, 2013
Found Recipes

Prepare To Get Hot And Heavy With This Chicken Recipe

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 8:16 pm

Jay Bentley's technique for Cast Iron Roasted Half Chicken involves cooking a whole chicken between two very hot and heavy pans.
Courtesy of Lynn Donaldson

If you've got a chicken, two cast iron skillets and are feeling strong, Jay Bentley has a recipe for you: Cast Iron Roasted Half Chicken. The Montana restaurateur and co-author of Open Range: Steaks, Chops and More From Big Sky Country shared it for All Things Considered's Found Recipe series.

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1:38pm

Thu April 25, 2013
It's All Politics

Why The Bush Library Won't Make History

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 1:50 pm

Former President George W. Bush speaks alongside former first lady Laura Bush during the opening ceremony of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum on Thursday in Dallas.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Will history judge George W. Bush more kindly than his contemporaries have?

The man himself seems fairly indifferent.

"I don't think he really cares much at all, to be honest with you," says Kevin Sullivan, who served as White House communications director during Bush's second term. "I think he cares very little about where his approval rating stands today, compared to 2005 or 2008."

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