2:46am

Fri April 19, 2013
StoryCorps

Losing A Leg, But Gaining A Sense Of Purpose

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 9:30 pm

Jack Richmond and his daughter, Reagan, visit StoryCorps in Knoxville, Tenn.
StoryCorps

In 1987, Jack Richmond was driving a forklift at work when the vehicle overturned onto him, crushing his leg below the knee. His daughter, Reagan, was just 2 months old at the time.

"Initially when they told me I would lose my leg, I was in denial and disbelief and kind of like, 'What, why? Can't you fix it?' " Jack tells Reagan in a visit to StoryCorps in Knoxville, Tenn. "But it just couldn't be saved."

"And you had a brand new daughter — me," says Reagan, now 25. "What were you thinking?"

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2:46am

Fri April 19, 2013
Latin America

Post-Chavez Venezuela Grows More, Not Less, Polarized

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 8:37 am

Supporters of Venezuelan opposition presidential candidate Henrique Capriles protest in the area of Altamira, in Caracas, capital of Venezuela, on Monday.
Mauricio Valenzuela Xinhua/Landov

Under the rule of its late president, Hugo Chavez, Venezuela became a nation sharply divided between those who supported his self-styled socialist revolution and those who opposed it.

But after a disputed presidential election in which Chavez's deputy was ruled the winner by a razor-thin margin, the country appears more polarized than ever.

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2:44am

Fri April 19, 2013
Around the Nation

As Florida Bill Looks To Aid Feral Cats, Opponents Claw Back

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 6:59 pm

The Miami-based Cat Network operates a program that traps, neuters and releases feral cats back to their colonies. A bill before the Florida Legislature would offer legal protection to those programs.
Greg Allen NPR

In state legislatures around the country, lawmakers are debating important subjects — education reform, election laws, gun control and abortion. But in Florida, one of the hottest issues to come before the Legislature this term involves cats.

There, lawmakers are considering a contentious bill that would offer legal protection to groups that trap, neuter and return feral cats to their colonies.

An Alternative To Shelters

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2:43am

Fri April 19, 2013
Around the Nation

Changes Help San Diego Homeless, But Long Road Remains Ahead

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 3:05 pm

Wanda Rayborn, 63, was homeless for nine years and was living under a tree in downtown San Diego two years ago. She now lives in a newly renovated efficiency apartment — part of an initiative to help get homeless people off the streets.
Pam Fessler NPR

Two years ago, we reported on an ambitious campaign to end homelessness in downtown San Diego, a city with one of the largest homeless populations in the nation. The effort involved an unprecedented coalition of business leaders, community groups and government agencies.

At the time, some advocates for the homeless — after years of seeing other, failed efforts to get people off city streets — were skeptical that the campaign would amount to much.

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7:18pm

Thu April 18, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Boston In Collective Mourning After Marathon Attack

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Organizers gave that service in Boston a title: Healing Our City. Thousands of people took part both inside the cathedral and outside.

NPR's Jeff Brady spoke with Bostonians about this moment of collective remembrance.

JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: A theme emerged during the service, expressed here by Rev. Nancy Taylor.

THE REV. NANCY TAYLOR: We are shaken, but we are not forsaken. Another's hate will not make of us haters.

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7:18pm

Thu April 18, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Two Young Men Suspected In Boston Bombing Attack

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. A dramatic development today in Boston: The FBI announced that it is looking for two men they suspect of placing the bombs that killed three people at the Boston Marathon and injured more than 170. The FBI released both video and photos of the men at the site of the bombings. Here's Special Agent Richard DesLauriers.

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7:18pm

Thu April 18, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

FBI Turns To Public In Identifying Boston Bombing Suspects

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We turn now to Robert McFadden, who is the senior vice president of The Soufan Group. He's a 30-year veteran of U.S. federal law enforcement, with a special focus on counterterrorism. Thanks for joining us in the program today. Walk us through what happens now. Let's say that the FBI is deluged with thousands of phone calls from people who think, rightly or wrongly, that they have seen one or both of these men before. What does the FBI do?

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6:11pm

Thu April 18, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Investigators Name Two Suspects In Boston Bombing

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

We begin this hour with a major break in the investigation into Monday's bombings at the Boston Marathon.

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5:55pm

Thu April 18, 2013
Space

Tracking 'Killer Electrons' Help Predict Risks To Satellites

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We're accustomed to hearing about local weather conditions like high pressure zones or the jet stream. But just outside of the atmosphere, the conditions are a little stranger.

(SOUNDBITE OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES)

BLOCK: That's a recording made by two new NASA satellites launched to study space weather.

As Lauren Sommer reports from member station KQED, the satellites could be in for some extreme conditions this year.

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5:54pm

Thu April 18, 2013
It's All Politics

Historically Speaking, No Surprise In Senate Gun Control Vote

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., speaks after losing a vote on broader background checks for gun buyers, Wednesday at the Capitol.
Evan Vucci AP

If it seems perplexing why an idea that has broad support nationally could fail to pass the U.S. Senate, here's an important reminder: The Senate is not a democratic institution.

It never has been, and it was never designed to be. Rather, it was structured to give small or sparsely populated states the ability to stop the majority's will. And on Wednesday, that's how it worked out, as the Senate failed to reach a 60-vote threshold to support new background checks on gun purchases.

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