3:17am

Tue July 16, 2013
Books News & Features

Use The Books, Fans: 'Star Wars' Franchise Thrives In Print

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:56 am

There's been a frenzy of excitement since last year when Disney bought Lucasfilm, creator of the Star Wars franchise, and announced it would make more Star Wars movies. Fans are eagerly awaiting hints of what might happen next in the story, and one way the franchise keeps fans interested is through a pantheon of Star Wars books, the latest of which is Troy Denning's Star Wars: Crucible.

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3:16am

Tue July 16, 2013
Animals

Om Nom Nom: T. Rex Was, Indeed, A Voracious Hunter

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:44 am

Mind The Teeth: Fossils indicate that Tyrannosaurus rex was an active hunter, in addition to being a scavenger. And in Jurassic Park, it also had a sweet tooth for lawyers.
Universal Pictures Getty Images

Tyrannosaurus rex is perhaps one of the most famous animals to have ever roamed the Earth. This huge, fierce meat-eater has graced Hollywood films as the perpetual villain, and it has played a notorious role in the science community that studies it, too.

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3:15am

Tue July 16, 2013
Shots - Health News

South Africa Weighs Starting HIV Drug Treatment Sooner

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:22 am

A woman waits to get AIDS drugs on April 8 at a clinic in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa, about 55 miles north of Johannesburg. New WHO guidelines say patients should start HIV treatment much earlier, before they become extremely sick.
Stephane de Sakutin AFP/Getty Images

The World Health Organization has issued revised guidelines saying that people with HIV should be put on antiviral drugs far earlier than was previously recommended. The hope is that most patients would get started on treatment before they begin to get extremely sick.

It's a move that could have huge implications for African nations where millions of people are infected with HIV. In South Africa roughly 5.5 million people are living with HIV — more than any other country in the world. South Africa also has more people in treatment than anywhere else.

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3:13am

Tue July 16, 2013
Sports

An Unreal Sport: Mixing 'Fantasy Life' With Reality

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:21 am

Matthew Berry's new book, "The Fantasy Life," talks about how a made-up game has affected millions of lives, including his own.

It's the fourth most popular sport in the United States and more than 30 million people play it in the United States and Canada. Around 13 percent of Americans played it in 2012. There are hundreds of variations across multiple sports, but football is by far the most popular.

And it's pure fantasy.

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2:56am

Tue July 16, 2013
The Two-Way

Ex-Nixon Adviser Leonard Garment Dies At 89

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:54 pm

Leonard Garment, acting White House Counsel, briefs the media at the White House on President Nixon's statement about the Watergate affair in 1973.
AP

Former White House adviser Leonard Garment, who had been ill, died Saturday at his Manhattan home, his wife, Suzanne Garment, told The Associated Press yesterday. He was 89.

Garment and Richard Nixon met while working together at a law firm in 1963. He later went to work in the Nixon White House and became White House counsel.

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2:03am

Tue July 16, 2013
Music Interviews

Robert Randolph Ushers In Steel-Guitar Soul With 'Lickety Split'

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:22 am

Robert Randolph & The Family Band's new album, Lickety Split, is out Tuesday.
Courtesy of the artist

The 33-year-old frontman of Robert Randolph & The Family Band has strong roots in gospel music. As a kid, he grew up attending the House of God church in Orange, N.J. That's where he first played the "sacred steel" guitar, a driving force behind the band's soulful new album, Lickety Split.

In the 1920s, African-American Pentecostal churches began using the steel guitar in place of an organ. From there, it became an instrument that helped usher in a new gospel style.

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6:13pm

Mon July 15, 2013
Books News & Features

Aparecium! J.K. Rowling Revealed As 'Cuckoo' Mystery Author

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:54 pm

Rowling says writing under a pseudonym was a "liberating experience."
Debra Hurford Brown

It's a detective story — about a detective story. The book in question is The Cuckoo's Calling, a debut novel released earlier this year by a former British military man named Robert Galbraith.

The reviews were excellent — especially for a first novel. There was just one hitch: The Cuckoo's Calling wasn't a debut at all. Nor was it by Robert Galbraith. As The Sunday Times revealed this weekend, Galbraith is a pseudonym for one of the best-known writers working today: Harry Potter creator J.K. Rowling.

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6:13pm

Mon July 15, 2013
Race

Zimmerman Verdict Feels Personal For Some In Service Sorority

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 7:54 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder greets Alexis Margaret Herman, member of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority, before speaking at the organization's convention.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Attorney General Eric Holder looked out over a sea of women in red on Monday and invoked his wife, a member of the influential African-American sorority Delta Sigma Theta. Holder was addressing the sorority's national convention in its centennial year.

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6:13pm

Mon July 15, 2013
It's All Politics

Reid's Limited Senate Options Lead To 'Nuclear' Threat

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 7:23 pm

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid warns that if Republicans don't relent on filibusters, they will leave him no choice but to change the chamber's rules.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Sen. Harry Reid may sound a tad hypocritical to some for saying he now supports changing Senate rules in order to end the one that says 60 senators must approve before presidential nominations can get up or down votes. This comes only several years after he indicated he opposed changing the requirement to a simple 51-vote majority.

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6:05pm

Mon July 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Feds Unlikely To Prosecute Zimmerman, Former Prosecutors Say

In Los Angeles on Sunday, demonstrators expressed their anger over the acquittal of George Zimmerman on the charges he faced for the death of Trayvon Martin.
Jim Ruymen UPI /Landov
  • On 'All Things Considered': NPR's Carrie Johnson and Audie Cornish

Looking ahead after the not guilty verdict in the trial of George Zimmerman for the death of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin — a case that reignited the national discussion about race relations:

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