4:45am

Mon June 24, 2013
Around the Nation

In Chicago, Public Housing Experiment Enters New Phase

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 12:25 pm

The last high rise at Chicago's Cabrini-Green public housing complex was demolished in 2011.
M. Spencer Green AP

The Chicago Housing Authority has torn down all of its high rises and says it's close to completing its plans to transform public housing. Now, city leaders are moving to the next part of their plan: using public housing funds not just to build homes for poor families, but stores where they could shop and work. Some residents, however, say the city is breaking a promise to provide affordable housing.

Read more

4:45am

Mon June 24, 2013
Energy

Can An Old Massachusetts Fishing Port Light The World Again?

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 4:21 pm

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick joined state officials, clean energy advocates and union representatives to break ground for the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal.
Jesse Costa WBUR

A shabby old fishing port on the South Coast of Massachusetts was once known as the City That Lit the World. Its whale oil powered candles and lamps around the country.

Now, the city is trying to rekindle that flame with an alternative form of energy: offshore wind.

A Distant History Of Wealth

New Bedford's glory days are long gone. The city suffers from a long list of woes — high crime, persistent unemployment and poor public schools.

Read more

4:45am

Mon June 24, 2013
Shots - Health News

Proposed Changes In Organ Donation Stir Debate

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

Hospitals and organ banks could get more leeway in decisions about donations.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

The nation's organ transplant network will consider a controversial proposal Monday to overhaul the guidelines for an increasingly common form of organ donation.

The board of directors of the United Network for Organ Sharing will open a two-day meeting at the organization's headquarters in Richmond, Va., to consider new guidelines for donation after cardiac death.

Donation after cardiac death involves removing organs minutes after life-support has been stopped for patients who still have at least some brain activity.

Read more

5:02pm

Sun June 23, 2013
Author Interviews

A Mother Rescues Her Daughter From War-Torn Syria

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 6:51 pm

Louise Monaghan was previously a senior travel consultant. She's currently a full-time mother.
Courtesy St. Martin's Press

Louise Monaghan's journey to Syria to rescue her kidnapped daughter begins years ago at a club in Cyprus. It was there she met a Syrian man named Mostafa, whom she would marry.

"I was smitten from the first second," she tells NPR's Jacki Lyden. "I felt he was what I needed. He made me feel safe."

But Monaghan was not safe. Mostafa was verbally abusive and beat her. They married, and the couple had a daughter named May. When they divorced, Mostafa was given visitation rights, but he wanted more.

Read more

5:02pm

Sun June 23, 2013
Music

DJ Betto Arcos Spins The Latest From Brazil

Graveola celebrates its hometown of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in the song "Babulina's Trip."
Flavia Mafra Courtesy of the artist

5:02pm

Sun June 23, 2013
Around the Nation

The 'Time Capsule' Of Mob Lingo At The Whitey Bulger Trial

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:39 am

The testimonies of James "Whitey" Bulger and his Winter Hill Gang cohort have been filled with well-preserved mob lingo.
Jane Flavell Collins ASSOCIATED PRESS

This week, we've been immersed in news about mobs both real and fictional, with the death of Sopranos star James Gandolfini and the continuing trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

The Sopranos gave us a primer on mob language like "clipping" a "rat." But Bulger's Winter Hill Gang and his Boston Irish cohort were the real deal. Members of Bulger's old cohort came to the witness stand and used the real-life slang of their gang days.

Read more

4:25pm

Sun June 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Hospitalized Nelson Mandela In Critical Condition

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 6:54 am

A print of Nelson Mandela and get well messages lay outside the home of the former President Mandela in Johannesburg, South Africa earlier this month.
Themba Hadebe Associated Press

Nelson Mandela, the former South African president and anti-apartheid leader, is in critical condition in a hospital in Pretoria where he was admitted two weeks ago with a recurring respiratory infection.

A statement from South African President Jacob Zuma said the 94-year-old Mandela's condition had become critical over the past 24 hours.

"The doctors are doing everything possible to get his condition to improve and are ensuring that Madiba is well-looked after and is comfortable. He is in good hands," said Zuma, referring to Mandela by his clan name.

Read more

3:19pm

Sun June 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Malaysia Declares Emergency From Cross-Border Blanket Of Smoke

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 6:55 am

The landmark Petronas Twin Towers (top, right) in the Malaysian capital, Kuala Lumpur, are barely visible amid the thick smoke. It's even worse farther south.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Malaysia has declared a state of emergency in the country's south after choking smog from slash-and-burn agriculture in neighboring Indonesia enveloped the region.

Residents in Muar and Ledang districts of Johor state have been told to stay indoors. This comes after a similar order in Singapore last week.

Read more

11:43am

Sun June 23, 2013
The Two-Way

High-Wire Artist Nik Wallenda Walks Across Arizona Gorge

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 11:18 pm

Daredevil Nik Wallenda crosses a tightrope 1,500 feet above the Little Colorado River Gorge, Ariz., on Sunday.
Rick Bowmer AP

Update at 10:03 p.m. ET

Nik Wallenda successfully walked the 1,500 feet across the Colorado River Gorge in Arizona on Sunday. The high-wire daredevil, famous for similar walks like the one he did at Niagara Falls, made the precarious trek live on television and without a net or safety line.

The walk took Wallenda 22 minutes of edging his way along the 2-inch-thick cable.

Our Original Post Continues:

Read more

10:43am

Sun June 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Pakistan Gunmen Kill Foreign Climbers In Brazen Attack

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 1:05 pm

A 2003 photograph of majestic Nanga Parbat, one of a number of 8,000-plus-meter peaks that attract the most adventurous Himalayan mountaineers.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

(This story was last updated at 10:40 a.m. ET)

Armed assailants attacked a hotel at a Himalayan base camp in Pakistan, gunning down nine foreign climbers and a local guide as the group prepared for an ascent of one of the world's tallest peaks.

NPR's Philip Reeves reports that Ukrainians and Chinese climbers, as well as a Pakistani guide, were killed in the attack at 26,246-foot Nanga Parbat, about 150 miles northeast of Pakistan's capital, Islamabad.

Read more

Pages