Sara Hossaini is a reporter for Wyoming Public Radio. She holds a bachelor's degree in broadcast journalism from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She brings a blend of documentary journalism and public interest communications experience developed through her work as a nonprofit multimedia consultant and Associate Producer on national PBS documentary films through groups such as the Center for Asian American Media, Fenton Communications and The Working Group. She likes to travel, to get her hands in the dirt and to explore her creative side through music, crafts and dance.

2:56am

Wed June 12, 2013
Author Interviews

With Space-Bound Hubbies, 'Astrowives' Became 'First Reality Stars'

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 5:53 am

Annie Glenn, Rene Carpenter, Louise Shepard, Betty Grissom, Trudy Cooper and Marjorie Slayton attend a luncheon held in their honor by the American Newspaper Women's Club on April 27, 1962, in Washington, D.C. Mercury Seven wife Josephine Schirra is not pictured.
Harvey Georges AP

In the late 1950s, after the Soviet Union successfully put their satellite, Sputnik 1, into orbit, American fears over the Communist threat reached a new height. The U.S. was trailing badly in a competition that would come to define the next decade – the race to space.

So on April 9, 1959, the U.S. kicked off its own space age by introducing the country to its first astronauts, known as the Mercury Seven. Their story is well known, but the story of their wives is often overlooked.

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2:55am

Wed June 12, 2013
U.S.

Immigration Bill May Keep Wage Exemption For Foreign Herders

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 5:53 am

Antonio Basualdo Solorzano has worked at the Ladder Ranch in south-central Wyoming for eight years. On his wages as a guest worker, he's supported seven children back home in Peru.
Sara Hossaini for NPR

When Patrick and Sharon O'Toole began their ranching business on the Wyoming-Colorado border, they tended the sheep themselves. But eventually, the O'Tooles wanted to settle down and have kids, so they hired foreign ranch hands with H-2A, or guest worker, visas to work on the ranch for $750 a month.

Peruvian shepherds on guest worker visas tend thousands of sheep in Wyoming, but they only make about half of what agricultural workers elsewhere are paid.

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12:38am

Wed June 12, 2013
The Record

Boards Of Canada Tap A Devout Following To Push New Album

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 5:53 am

Boards of Canada's new album is titled Tomorrow's Harvest.
Courtesy of the artist

11:26pm

Tue June 11, 2013
Riverbend 2013

Festival Highlight: Voices of Lee

Voices of Lee perform at the 2013 Riverbend Festival.
Credit Mike Miller

Tuesday nights at Riverbend are always set aside for family-friendly entertainment.  This year on Faith and Family night, Voices of Lee performed a mix of gospel and patriotic songs.

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10:03pm

Tue June 11, 2013
Sweetness And Light

Basketball: The 'Ultimate Contradiction'

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 5:53 am

In basketball, as in life, we may dutifully celebrate the aggregate, but we'™re always spellbound by the exceptional.
iStockphoto.com

Basketball offers its fans the ultimate contradiction. On the one hand, it's the sport that most depends on its stars. On the other, it's the most intimate — even organic — of all the team games, with its players more fundamentally involved with one another. Both of these opposing realities are rooted in the same base.

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7:40pm

Tue June 11, 2013
It's All Politics

Senate's New GOP Stars Show Party's Range On Immigration

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Forget, for a moment, about the bipartisan Gang of Eight, whose members crafted the original version of the immigration bill being taken up by the Senate this week.

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7:15pm

Tue June 11, 2013
Law

Privacy In Retreat, A Timeline

President Bush signs the Patriot Act Bill during a ceremony in the White House East Room on Oct. 26, 2001.
Doug Mills AP

Viewed out of context, recent Washington revelations paint a disturbing portrait of the vast amount of electronic data the nation's spy agencies are collecting. But the blockbuster news stories belie a simple truth: Personal privacy rights have been under sustained assault since well before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. And it's not just government that's vacuuming up information.

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6:56pm

Tue June 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Winfrey Gives Millions To New African-American Museum In D.C.

Oprah Winfrey gave $12 million Tuesday to help build the Smithsonian's new National Museum of African American History and Culture, seen here in a scale model (lower center). The facility is expected to open in 2015.
Allison Keyes NPR

Media mogul Oprah Winfrey is giving a multimillion-dollar boost to the Smithsonian's new facility, the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). She gave the museum, which is being built in Washington, D.C., $12 million Tuesday, in addition to a previous $1 million donation.

"I am so proud of African-American history and its contributions to our nation as a whole," says Winfrey, chairman and CEO of the Oprah Winfrey Network. "I am deeply appreciative of those who paved the path for me and all who follow in their footsteps."

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5:58pm

Tue June 11, 2013
It's All Politics

What Did Congress Really Know About NSA Tracking?

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:20 pm

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is among the lawmakers who say they were never briefed about the government's surveillance programs.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

If you're a member of Congress and you didn't know about the National Security Agency's phone records program before it was disclosed last week, President Obama has this to say to you: Where have you been?

"When it comes to telephone calls, every member of Congress has been briefed on this program," Obama said to reporters last Friday.

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