4:57pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Technology

Vintage Sounds: The Clacks And Dings Of Pinball Machines

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We've asked you to send us stories about the vintage sounds of technology you miss, and we've been listening to those stories on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. Today, Scott Smith of Duncan, South Carolina, with the help of his own vintage sound collection, tells us about something he recalls first hearing when he was a small child.

SCOTT SMITH: I can remember I fell in love with the startup sound of an electromechanical pinball machine, oh, when I was 3 or 4 years old.

(SOUNDBITE OF A PINBALL MACHINE)

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4:42pm

Mon May 27, 2013
The Two-Way

McCain Meets With Rebels In Syria

Sen. John McCain, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, briefly entered Syria to meet with rebel forces on Monday, according to his spokesman.
Allison Shelley Getty Images

Arizona Sen. John McCain spent his Memorial Day in Syria. As NPR's Jonathan Blakley reports from Beirut, McCain's spokesman says the senator crossed into northern Syria from Turkey to meet with rebels in the country, ripped apart by the 2-year conflict turned civil war.

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4:28pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Food

Gathering Around The 'Global Grill'

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:36 pm

Bon Appetit editor Adam Rapoport compiled recipes from all over the world for The Grilling Book. Pictured here are Chicken Yakitori.
Courtesy of Peden + Munk

Grilling is a pillar of the American summer and the world's oldest form of cooking. From Latin America to Africa, grilling is at the heart of many cultures. This summer All Things Considered is setting out to explore some of them with the "Global Grill" series.

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4:12pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Parallels

At 500, Machiavelli's 'Prince' Still Inspires Love And Fear

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 5:52 pm

A portrait of Italian philosopher, writer and politician Niccolo Machiavelli (Florence, 1469-1527) by Antonio Maria Crespi. Half a millennium after he wrote The Prince, the slim volume continues to play an important role in political thought and evoke strong response.
Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana De Agostini/Getty Images

The name Niccolo Machiavelli is synonymous with political deceit, cynicism and the ruthless use of power. The Italian Renaissance writer called his most famous work, The Prince, a handbook for statesmen.

An exhibit underway in Rome celebrates the 500th anniversary of what is still considered one of the most influential political essays in Western literature.

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3:12pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Found Recipes

What's Your Favorite Taste Of Summer?

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 6:01 pm

For NPR producer Melissa Gray, nothing says summer more than a cold glass of limeade.
booleansplit/via Flickr

If your motivation plummets during summer's hot and sweaty days, a sweltering kitchen may be the last place on earth you want to be.

But despite the season, we still need to eat and drink. A good story and recipe can go a long way to raising your spirits and divert attention from how miserable you are.

All Things Considered wants to know which recipes give you that boost in the summer.

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3:06pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Parallels

Palestinian Used Imprisoned Husband's Sperm To Get Pregnant

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:40 am

Red Cross vehicles outside Israel's Ofer prison, between Jerusalem and Ramallah.
David Vaaknin Getty Images

Israeli prison officials invited reporters last month on a first-ever tour of the Ofer prison, a concrete-and-barbed wire compound on the northern edge of Jerusalem. More than 700 Palestinians are detained here for alleged security violations in connection with the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

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2:13pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Parallels

'We Are Not Valued': Brazil's Domestic Workers Seek Rights

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:57 pm

Cassia Mendes, who has worked as a housekeeper for more than 20 years, cleans a house in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Feb. 19, 2012. Brazil enacted on April 2 a constitutional amendment to grant domestic workers health insurance and other benefits.
AFP/Getty Images

The phone is ringing off the hook at the crowded waiting room at the Domestic Workers Union in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil.

In the past decade, millions of Brazilians have joined the middle class. Advocates say this isn't just the result of a growing economy or social spending, but also laws like the one just passed that enshrine domestic workers' rights.

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2:10pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Parallels

Let Them Eat Grass: Paris Employs Sheep As Eco-Mowers

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 6:02 pm

Sheep used to replace gas-guzzling lawn mowers graze at a truck warehouse at Evry, south of Paris.
Francois Mori AP

City officials in Paris are experimenting with an unconventional way to keep urban lawns trimmed.

Agnes Masson used to be simply the director of the Paris city archives. Now, she's also a shepherdess of sorts, responsible for four black sheep munching the lush grass surrounding the gray archives building at the eastern edge of the city.

Masson says the ewes are efficient and easy to care for.

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2:00pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Remembrances

Jake McNiece, WWII Hero And Self-Described 'Troublemaker'

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 7:14 pm

On June 5, 1944, Jake McNiece (right) led a group of paratroopers in World War II. After he shaved his head and painted his face before dropping behind German lines for D-Day, the look caught on with his men.
U.S. Military

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who have died this year.

The Dirty Dozen was a Hollywood hit, but it was based — loosely — on a true-to-life WWII paratrooper regiment. Jake McNiece led the group, whose exploits inspired the 1967 movie and earned the nickname "The Filthy Thirteen." McNiece died in January at the age of 93.

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1:55pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Afghanistan

Service Members Observe Memorial Day Through Sweat And Tears

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:57 pm

U.S. Army Sgt. Michael Johnson trains at Bagram Air Field for the Memorial Day Murphy, a CrossFit workout honoring a Navy SEAL killed in Afghanistan in 2005.
David Gilkey NPR

At Bagram Air Force Base in Afghanistan, Staff Sgt. Michael Johnson exercises under a long, steel framework set on a wooden platform. It looks like a giant jungle gym. Above his head are pull-up bars and rings. A climbing rope is off to one side.

It's here where he and dozens of other soldiers and sailors will remember the fallen, just after sunrise, on Memorial Day. They'll all take part in a grueling exercise regimen, part of CrossFit, the popular high-intensity workout program.

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