8:25am

Fri November 30, 2012
The Two-Way

In Egypt: Draft Of Constitution OK'd; Protesters Return To Tahrir Square

A protester shouts early Friday in Cairo's Tahrir Square.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Protesters have streamed into Cairo's Tahrir Square again today, correspondent Merrit Kennedy tells our Newscast Desk.

She says they're there both to demonstrate again against President Mohammed Morsi's decree giving himself sweeping new powers and to express concern about a draft constitution passed early today by Egypt's constitutional assembly.

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7:05am

Fri November 30, 2012
Digital Life

Woman Turns To Facebook To Help Find Beloved Hat

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7:05am

Fri November 30, 2012
Strange News

Toilet-Paper Thief Returns 80 Rolls To University

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The holidays bring out the spirit of giving and giving back what you've pilfered. Recently, we told you about a 1930s teapot returned to the Waldorf Astoria. This morning: a tale of toilet paper. Eastern New Mexico University received a gift box filled with 80 rolls of toilet paper and a Christmas card apologizing for stealing rolls from a dorm years ago. Another inspiring holiday moment, or another TP prank? It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

5:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
Politics

Idaho's Rep. Labrador On Immigration Jobs Bill

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 8:06 am

Renee Montagne talks with Rep. Raul Labrador, Republican from Idaho and one of the congressmen who introduced the bill that's set for a vote Friday. The STEM Jobs Act allows people who are in the U.S. legally who are getting advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering and math to stay and get their green cards, he says.

5:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
Sports

Golf's Storied St. Andrews Old Course Gets Facelift

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 7:05 am

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5:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
Law

Federal 'Compassionate' Prison Release Rarely Given

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 7:05 am

A new report says federal prison officials rarely grant "compassionate release," even for the most gravely ill inmates.
iStockphoto.com

Back in 1984, Congress gave authorities the power to let people out of federal prison early, in extraordinary circumstances, like if inmates were gravely ill or dying. But a new report says the Federal Bureau of Prisons blocks all but a few inmates from taking advantage of "compassionate release."

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5:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
Research News

Victory Or Defeat? Emotions Aren't All In The Face

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 8:20 pm

Can You Tell Emotion From Faces Alone? A new study suggests that when people evaluated just facial expressions — without cues from the rest of the body — they couldn't tell if the face was showing a positive or negative emotion. Enlarge this photo to see the answers.
Hillel Aviezer The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Photos of athletes in their moment of victory or defeat usually show faces contorted with intense emotion. But a new study suggests that people actually don't use those kinds of extreme facial expressions to judge how a person is feeling.

Instead, surprisingly, people rely on body cues.

Hillel Aviezer, a psychology researcher at Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel, wanted to see how accurately people can read intense, real-world facial expressions — instead of the standardized, posed images of facial expressions that are usually used in lab tests.

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5:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
Around the Nation

Native Americans To Soon Receive Settlement Checks

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 7:05 am

Elouise Cobell, a member of Montana's Blackfeet Tribe, and four other Native Americans led a class-action land use lawsuit against the U.S. government. Cobell is shown here in 2009 with Interior Secretary Ken Salazar after an announcement on the settlement of the lawsuit. Cobell died last year.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Federal officials are working to send out $1,000 checks in the next few weeks to hundreds of thousands of Native Americans. The money stems from a settlement of the Cobell case, a landmark $3.4 billion settlement over mismanagement of federal lands held in trust for Native American people.

The case was brought by Elouise Cobell, a member of Montana's Blackfeet Tribe, and four other Native Americans in 1996.

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5:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
It's All Politics

How Much Income Taxes Could Rise: A Breakdown Of The Options

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 10:46 am

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill Thursday after private talks with Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

"No substantive progress has been made." That's what House Speaker John Boehner had to say Thursday about efforts to avoid automatic spending cuts and tax increases at year's end.

The administration's lead negotiator, Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner, met with congressional leaders from both sides of the aisle Thursday, looking for an agreement on the hazard Congress and the White House created last year to focus their minds on deficit reduction.

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5:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
Latin America

High Expectations As Mexico's Pena Nieto Takes Helm

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 7:05 am

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