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10:12am

Sun June 28, 2015
The Two-Way

SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Breaks Up On Liftoff

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 4:58 pm

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft breaks apart shortly after liftoff Sunday at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
John Raoux AP

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET

An unmanned SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket experienced what the private space launch company calls "some type of anomaly in first-stage flight" about two and a half minutes into its flight.

NASA commentator George Diller confirmed that "the vehicle has broken up."

Pieces could be seen raining down on the Atlantic Ocean over the rocket's intended trajectory. More than 5,200 pounds of cargo, including the first docking port designed for NASA's next-generation crew capsule, were aboard.

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10:00am

Sun June 28, 2015
The Two-Way

Kuwait Says Saudi Responsible For Mosque Suicide Bombing

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 3:13 pm

People gather near flag-draped coffins of Kuwaiti Shiite victims from Friday's suicide bombing at a mosque in the capital.
Khider Abbas EPA/Landov

The suicide bomber who attacked a Shiite mosque in Kuwait last week, killing 27 people, was a Saudi national who flew into the neighboring Gulf nation hours before carrying out his deadly mission, Kuwaiti officials say. The self-declared Islamic State later claimed responsibility for the attack.

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9:08am

Sun June 28, 2015
It's All Politics

A Less-Restrained Obama Finally Says 'Bucket'

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 7:44 am

With less than two years left in his presidency, President Obama has been less scripted and appears less confined by politics.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

8:46am

Sun June 28, 2015
The Two-Way

Greece To Close Banks, Impose Capital Controls Amid Looming Default

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 9:19 pm

A security worker brings money to a National Bank branch in Athens on Sunday. Greeks have been withdrawing euros in anticipation of a possible default on the country's debt payments early next week.
Marko Djurica Reuters/Landov

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Greece's Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras announced Sunday that banks will be closed and capital controls imposed in order to stave off a run on the euro after negotiations with the country's international lenders broke down.

He said the Athens stock market would also be closed.

However, Tsipras blamed the European Central Bank for the latest crisis after it decided not to increase the amount of emergency liquidity amid a run on the banks that saw people lined up at ATMs, many of which ran dry amid the onslaught.

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7:51am

Sun June 28, 2015
The Salt

Do Try This At Home: Hacking Ribs — In The Pressure Cooker

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 9:40 am

To make baby back ribs in an hour, instead of the usual three to four hours, you'll need a pressure cooker.
Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman and Emily Bogle NPR

This summer, NPR is getting crafty in the kitchen. As part of Weekend Edition's Do Try This At Home series, chefs are sharing their cleverest hacks and tips — taking expensive, exhausting or intimidating recipes and tweaking them to work in any home kitchen.

This week: Making delicious, fall-off-the-bone baby back ribs in only about an hour — with a surprising piece of kitchen equipment.

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7:51am

Sun June 28, 2015
Europe

Will Greece Stay In The Eurozone? Citizens Set To Vote On Bailout Deal

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 9:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

7:51am

Sun June 28, 2015
U.S.

Euphoria In The Streets: New York City's Pride Festival Celebrates Marriage Equality

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 9:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

7:51am

Sun June 28, 2015
U.S.

'There Are Basic Moral Rules': Young Evangelicals React To Supreme Court Marriage Ruling

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 11:16 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

7:03am

Sun June 28, 2015
It's All Politics

How Well Do Hate Crime Laws Really Work?

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 1:14 pm

Flowers line the sidewalk in front of the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C.
Stephen B. Morton AP

Federal officials are investigating last week's Charleston, S.C. church shooting as a hate crime, and the U.S. Justice Department could weigh in in the coming weeks with a federal hate crimes charge.

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7:03am

Sun June 28, 2015
It's All Politics

One-Third Of Congressional Districts Could Be Affected By Supreme Court Ruling

As a staff member takes down the Arizona redistricting map, Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission chair Colleen Mathis gets a hug from Frank Bergen, a Pima County Democrat, at a 2012 meeting.
Ross D. Franklin AP

On the final day of the Supreme Court's term on Monday, they will issue a ruling that could affect as many as one-third of congressional districts — possibly dramatically remaking the partisan makeup of the next Congress ahead of the 2016 elections.

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7:03am

Sun June 28, 2015
Goats and Soda

It Turns Out We Really Didn't Know What People Are Dying From

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 10:08 pm

Courtesy of HarperCollins

Jeremy Smith has written a new book called Epic Measures: One Doctor. Seven Billion Patients. It profiles the work of Christopher Murray, a Harvard-trained doctor and health economist who looked at a lot of numbers about how people live and die around the world and found that it's all a guess.

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5:44am

Sun June 28, 2015
The Two-Way

Nearly 500 Burned In Taiwan As Fire Erupts In Water Park

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 7:52 am

Police investigators inspect the stage area after an accidental explosion during a music concert at the Formosa Water Park in New Taipei City, Taiwan, early Sunday. The resulting fire injured more than 500 concert-goers.
AP

Nearly 500 people were injured at a water park in Taiwan after an explosion at a music event caused a fire to break out Saturday night.

The fire started during an evening rap performance in New Taipei City, NPR's Frank Langfitt, reporting from Shanghai, tells our Newscast unit. The accident at Formosa Fun Coast was caught on cellphone video.

"At one point, green powder shot out from the stage over the audience," Frank says. "The powder quickly ignited, enveloping fans. Some people staggered around on fire, while others collapsed to the ground."

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5:12am

Sun June 28, 2015
Environment

Wildlife Forensics Lab Uses Tech To Sniff, Identify Illegal Wood

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Forensics Lab Director Ken Goddard holds a wood sample used in the lab's forensic work in Ashland, Ore.
Jes Burns OPB/EarthFix

Before you prosecute thieves, you have to know what they stole. It's the same for crimes against nature.

The world's only wildlife forensic lab is in southern Oregon. The lab usually specializes in endangered animal cases, but armed with a high-tech device, it's now helping track shipments of contraband wood.

There's a small woodshop at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Forensics Lab. But there's no sawdust, or power tools. The shop is more like an archive, containing samples of some of the rarest woods on the planet — African mahogany, Brazilian ebony and more.

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5:10am

Sun June 28, 2015
It's All Politics

Presidential Aspiration Born From A Modest, And Tragic, Beginning

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 9:40 am

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. announces his candidacy for president in Central, S.C. on June 1.
Jessica McGowan Getty Images

Greg Demetri hit the jackpot. When he picked the location for Villa Toscana, his nearly one-year-old Italian restaurant on the main stretch of businesses in Central, S.C., he had no idea that the building had once been owned by the town's most famous resident, Sen. Lindsey Graham.

Graham, a South Carolina native who announced recently that he would seek the Republican party's nomination for president, first lived in a room behind his family's business, the Sanitary Café — a bar and pool hall on Main Street — before moving into the house that now holds Demetri's restaurant.

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7:04pm

Sat June 27, 2015
NPR History Dept.

The Cherry Sisters: Worst Act Ever?

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 8:37 am

The Cherry Sisters: Three of the siblings strike a theatrical pose.
The History Center

In the early 20th century, the Cherry Sisters — a family of performers from Marion, Iowa — were like a meme.

Simply invoking the name — the Cherry Sisters — was shorthand for anything awful. As Anthony Slide wrote in the Encyclopedia of Vaudeville, the onstage siblings became "synonymous with any act devoid of talent."

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