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5:06pm

Mon April 16, 2012
Latin America

Panama Booms While Poor Watch From Afar

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 6:12 pm

Tourists visit the San Felipe neighborhood in Panama City in December 2011. Panama is experiencing record economic growth, but many fear the benefits aren't trickling down to the poor.
Rodrigo Arangua AFP/Getty Images

The Central American nation of Panama is booming. Fueled by a multibillion-dollar expansion of the Panama Canal, a thriving banking industry and capital flight from Venezuela, the tiny nation has the highest economic growth rate in the hemisphere.

But even as the government builds a subway system and markets the country as a tropical paradise for multinational corporations, not everyone is sharing in the prosperity.

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5:05pm

Mon April 16, 2012
The Two-Way

Why Did The Rooster Cross The Road? To Get To A Chicken Restaurant

Gus, who has picked an interesting place to hang out.
WREG-TV

Thank goodness he doesn't know what's going on inside.

Candice Ludlow of member station WKNO today helps All Things Considered ketchup ... er catch up ... on a story that's been cooking for a week or so in Tennessee.

It seems that a big red rooster has been hanging out in front of a restaurant in Collierville, Tenn., for the past few months.

But it's not just any restaurant.

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5:02pm

Mon April 16, 2012
The End Of The Space Shuttle Era

Shuttle Discovery To Make Final Flight, Atop A 747

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 6:12 pm

The space shuttle Discovery is loaded onto the back of a modified 747 at Kennedy Space Center on April 15. The plane will ferry the shuttle to Washington, D.C., on April 17, where it will be permanently installed at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.
Kim Shiflett NASA

On Tuesday morning, space shuttle Discovery will become the first of NASA's three shuttles — plus a shuttle prototype — to travel to its new retirement home.

NASA flew its last shuttle flight in July. Since then, it's been prepping the spaceships to become museum displays. And even though the shuttles are headed to places like Los Angeles and New York rather than the space station, figuring out how to get them there has still been a major undertaking.

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4:55pm

Mon April 16, 2012
Interviews

'Our Challenges Are Complex,' The First Lady Says

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 11:52 am

First lady Michelle Obama says raising her two daughters in the White House "has been less stressful than I would have imagined." Seen here at the White House in March, the first lady's new project aims to help military veterans and their families.
Alex Wong Getty Images

First lady Michelle Obama wears many hats in the White House. In addition to being President Obama's closest confidante, she's also a mother whose two daughters are growing up in one of the most public homes in America.

And as first lady, Mrs. Obama has taken on her own signature public issues, as well.

Her Let's Move campaign has brought attention to the growing epidemic of childhood obesity. She has encouraged children to eat right and get plenty of exercise.

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4:42pm

Mon April 16, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Plastic Surgeons Say Demand Is Surging For Chin Enhancements

Originally published on Wed April 18, 2012 4:26 pm

Plastic surgeons see a surge in demand from those of us without naturally chiseled chins.
Maciej Laska iStockphoto.com

Chin up. Literally.

A big group of plastic surgeons say that chin enhancement was the fastest growing surgical procedure they performed for cosmetic purposes in the U.S. last year — up 71 percent to 20,680 operations.

Now, it's still a small number, overall, compared with breast augmentation, the No. 1 procedure at 307,180. But those surgeries rose only 4 percent in 2011 compared with 2010.

Chin work was most popular out west, which is true for most cosmetic procedures. The Northeast came in second.

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4:40pm

Mon April 16, 2012
Governing

Expert: Proud Secret Service 'Furious' Over Incident

President Obama speaks at the San Pedro Claver church in Cartagena, Colombia, on Sunday. An expert on the Secret Service tells NPR that Obama's security was never breached in the incident that led to 11 U.S. Secret Service agents being sent home amid allegations that they hired prostitutes in Cartagena.
Carolyn Kaster AP

The Secret Service, which has been offering protection to presidents since 1902, has long enjoyed one of the most sterling reputations of any government agency.

That reputation has been tarnished by allegations that agents hired prostitutes in Colombia in advance of President Obama's trip there.

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4:00pm

Mon April 16, 2012
The Record

Andrew Love Of The Memphis Horns Has Died

Andrew Love (left) and Wayne Jackson pose for a studio portrait in 1965.
Gilles Petard Redferns

Saxophonist Andrew Love of the Memphis Horns has died. Love, who had Alzheimer's disease, died on April 12 at his home in Memphis. He was 70 years old.

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3:38pm

Mon April 16, 2012
Around the Nation

For One Soldier, Rap Is A Powerful Postwar Weapon

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:53 am

In 2010 US Army veteran Jeff Barillaro returned from Iraq with severe PTSD. Since then Barillaro, whose stage name is "Solider Hard," has been rapping about his struggles and performing for troops, veterans, and military families across the US.
Erik M. Lunsford NPR

When Jeff Barillaro came home from fighting the war in Iraq, he felt lost, like thousands of veterans do. He didn't have a mission anymore.

But now, through music, he's found one: Under the stage name Soldier Hard, Barillaro raps — about how war has changed troops and their families. Other vets and their family members are now turning to his music, because they say he's speaking to them.

On a recent morning, the National Guard Armory in Evansville, Ind., looks and sounds like any military base in the country.

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2:35pm

Mon April 16, 2012
The Two-Way

Pulitzer Prizes Coming Up

(The awards were announced just after 3 p.m. ET.)

For its "distinguished ... reporting on significant issues of local concern," reporter Sara Ganim and The Patriot News of Harrisburg, Pa., have won a 2012 Pulitzer Prize for uncovering the so-called Penn State scandal.

Other prize winners, which were just announced, include:

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1:41pm

Mon April 16, 2012
The Salt

Fast Food In The U.S. Has Way More Salt Than In Other Countries

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 3:46 pm

In the United States, you get the extra salt for free.
iStockphoto.com

Want extra salt with that fast-food meal? Then buy it in the United States, where chicken dishes, pizzas, and even salads are loaded with far more salt than in Europe and Australia, according to new research.

The McDonald's Chicken McNuggets in the United States have more than twice as much salt as their sister nuggets in the United Kingdom. That's 1.6 grams of salt for every 100 grams of American nugget, compared with 0.6 grams in the U.K.

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1:15pm

Mon April 16, 2012
The Two-Way

World Bank Chooses U.S.-Backed Kim To Be Its Next President

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 4:11 pm

The World Bank's executive directors have chosen Dr. Jim Yong Kim to be the development agency's next president.

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1:05pm

Mon April 16, 2012
The Picture Show

You're Not Alone: Tax-Payers Have Been Miserable For Decades

Alfred Eisenstaedt Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Misery loves company. Multitudes are no doubt making the last-minute scramble to finish taxes today. If that's the case for you, perhaps you can take solace in the fact that this tax misery is a long-lived American tradition.

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1:00pm

Mon April 16, 2012
The Two-Way

Key Players In Federal Agency's Vegas Scandal Due At Hearing

At a sometimes heated hearing today where members of the House got to express outrage, the man at the center of the General Services Administration scandal refused to testify.

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12:21pm

Mon April 16, 2012
The Salt

Is 'Tuna Scrape' The 'Pink Slime' Of Sushi?

Spicy tuna roll, or spicy tuna goo?
iStockphoto.com

The fact that there has been a salmonella outbreak among people who eat sushi isn't super surprising; raw seafood does pose more health risks than cooked fish.

But the fact that the fish implicated in the outbreak is something called "tuna scrape" sure got our attention here at The Salt.

According to the Food and Drug Administration's recall notice, tuna scrape is "tuna backmeat, which is specifically scraped off from the bones, and looks like a ground product." In other words, tuna hamburger.

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12:00pm

Mon April 16, 2012
Governing

D.C. Mayor Says Residents Not Free

Monday is Emancipation Day in Washington, D.C. In 1862, more than 3,000 slaves in the nation's capital were freed. Host Michel Martin speaks with Washington, D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray about Emancipation Day, and why he says Washington still suffers from a type of slavery.

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