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1:32pm

Tue April 10, 2012
Around the Nation

Philly Cops Bust Crime In 140 Characters Or Fewer

Philadelphia Police Detective Joseph Murray of West Philadelphia is an advocate of police tweeting to help engage the community in fighting crime.
Courtesy of Kimberly Paynter

The Philadelphia Police Department is adding a new tool to its crime-fighting arsenal — Twitter. Supporters say the real-time information-sharing could help police build a stronger rapport with residents and better protect them.

West Philadelphia resident Mike Van Helder remembers when police knocked down his neighbor's door at 6 a.m. "There was shouting and loud noises and of course I didn't know what it was about," Van Helder recalls. "And them being my next door neighbors, I was understandably concerned."

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1:11pm

Tue April 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Doctors Declare Norway's Confessed Killer Sane; Trial To Begin Monday

Anders Behring Breivik, the Norwegian man who confessed to killing 77 people last July, was not criminally insane when he bombed a government building and gunned unarmed people down at a youth conference, according to two psychiatrists appointed by a court in Norway.

The new development comes days before Behring Breivik's trial is set to begin, on April 16.

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1:00pm

Tue April 10, 2012
The Two-Way

George W. Bush Says He Doesn't Miss Being President

Originally published on Sun October 21, 2012 12:50 am

Former President George W. Bush in Washington, D.C., last September.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

"I'm often asked 'Do you miss the presidency?' I really don't," former President George W. Bush told an audience in New York City this morning, Politico reports.

It was an "was unbelievably interesting experience," he added, but "I had plenty of the limelight."

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12:25pm

Tue April 10, 2012
Music Reviews

Bonnie Raitt's 'Slipstream': A Barnstorming Good Time

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 4:39 pm

Bonnie Raitt.
Courtesy of the artist

The warmth and vigor of Bonnie Raitt's voice throughout her new album Slipstream, even when she's covering an oldie such as Gerry Rafferty's "Right Down the Line," is vital and fresh — urgent, even. Raitt has always possessed a gift for taking a familiar phrase and rendering it in a manner that compels a listener to think anew about what the words really mean.

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12:06pm

Tue April 10, 2012
Economy

For Economy, Government Work Is No Panacea

Some states are still struggling; California has lost 32,000 teaching positions since 2008. Here, teachers, parents and supporters rally as the Los Angeles Unified School District board meets to consider budget cuts and layoffs on Feb. 14.
Damian Dovarganes AP

At the end of most previous recessions, hiring has increased among state and local governments, helping the broader economy to recover.

That's not happening this time around.

Layoffs have started to taper off, and tax receipts are starting to improve. But states are still a long way from bringing their workforces back up to pre-recession levels. And cities and counties remain in greater fiscal peril.

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12:00pm

Tue April 10, 2012
Law

Are Hate Crime Laws Necessary?

A shooting spree that left three African-Americans dead in Oklahoma and the death of unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin have renewed public debate about hate crime laws. Host Michel Martin speaks with law professor and former federal prosecutor Paul Butler about hate crime statutes and whether they're necessary.

12:00pm

Tue April 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Increasingly, Reporters Must First Answer Some Questions

May we see some ID?
Alan Greenblatt

As he's been reporting for NPR.org in recent months, Alan Greenblatt has noticed something unusual: he's increasingly being asked to prove who he is and that he is, in fact, a journalist. Here's what he found when he started to ask why that's happening:

How many people would bother to impersonate a reporter? Enough, apparently, to cause some government officials to do preliminary background checks on people to whom they grant interviews.

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11:54am

Tue April 10, 2012
Sports

'Winding Up' As The Mets' Knuckleball Pitcher

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 10:58 am

R.A. Dickey currently plays for the New York Mets. He was previously with the Seattle Mariners, Minnesota Twins, Texas Rangers and Milwaukee Brewers.
courtesy of the author

Most pitchers in the majors stick to fastballs, curveballs, sliders and change-ups when facing batters at the plate.

But not New York Mets right-hander R.A. Dickey. Dickey is currently the only knuckleball pitcher in a current rotation. At 37, he's also one of the older pitchers in the league and has seen his career — and life — mimic the erratic trajectory of the difficult pitch he throws game after game.

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11:53am

Tue April 10, 2012
It's All Politics

'A Moon-Colony Guy'? The Republican Campaign Returns

After a relative lull in campaigning, the Republican presidential candidates are back at it Tuesday in Pennsylvania, Delaware, North Carolina and Texas.

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11:32am

Tue April 10, 2012
The Salt

More, Better, Faster Sushi? Call In A 'Sushi Bot'

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 8:39 pm

Suzbo sushi roller.
Youtube.com

Wired reports that "sushi bots" were among the eye-catching products at the World Food and Beverage Great Expo, which just wrapped up in Tokyo.

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10:35am

Tue April 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Marlins Manager Ozzie Guillen Suspended Following 'I Love Fidel' Comment

Marlins manager Ozzie Guillen during his news conference this morning in Miami.
Lynne Sladky AP
  • Tom Goldman on 'Morning Edition'

Miami Marlins manager Ozzie Guillen has been suspended without pay for five games, effective immediately, as the firestorm continues over his comment to Time magazine last week that "I love Fidel Castro."

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10:22am

Tue April 10, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Analysis Finds Lung Cancer Screening Worthwhile For Longtime Smokers

Dr. Steven Birnbaum positions a patient inside a CT scanner at Southern New Hampshire Medical Center in Nashua, N.H., in June 2010.
Jim Cole AP

Now there's fresh evidence that CT scans to detect early lung cancer belong on the short list of effective cancer screening technologies — at least for people at high risk.

Researchers conclude that spiral CT, which makes 3-D pictures of lungs, could reduce lung cancer deaths by 35 percent at a cost of $19,000 to $26,000 per year of life saved.

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8:55am

Tue April 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Carriers, FCC Join In Bid To Curb Cellphone Thefts

On the phone in Manhattan.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Wireless providers have agreed to create a national database of stolen cellphones that it is hoped will make the devices somewhat less tempting to thieves.

Julius Genachowski, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, and a group of lawmakers and law enforcement officials are set to announce outlines of the plan at 10 a.m. ET.

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8:20am

Tue April 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Tips Led To Tulsa Shooting Suspects' Arrests; Police Say They've Confessed

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 8:31 am

The key moment in the manhunt for suspects in a murder spree that terrorized African-Americans in Tulsa, Okla., came Saturday morning when a tip was called in to the city's Crime Stoppers hotline, the Tulsa World says.

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7:45am

Tue April 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Syria Says It Is Pulling Troops Back, Activists Say Army Continues To Attack

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 7:58 am

At a refugee camp in Reyhanli, Turkey, on Monday, Syrians sought help and safety.
Germano Assad AP

On this day when a U.N.-brokered cease-fire was supposed to go into effect in Syria, "activists reported military attacks on two towns ... even as the government claimed its military forces have begun pulling out" of some areas, The Associated Press reports.

The BBC says:

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