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3:31am

Fri April 18, 2014
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays

Six Words: 'Segregation Should Not Determine Our Future'

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 11:10 am

The student population at D'Leisha Dent's high school, Central High in Tuscaloosa, Ala., is almost entirely African-American. Dent says she and her peers wish they had more opportunities to interact with white students.
Maisie Crow

The investigative journalism group ProPublica, with reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones, has just completed a yearlong project, Segregation Now, exploring the re-segregation of schools in the U.S., with a particular look at Tuscaloosa, Ala.

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6:37pm

Thu April 17, 2014
The Two-Way

Even Chimps Know That A Firm Bed Makes For Quality Sleep

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:14 pm

A chimpanzee hangs from a tree trunk in Kibale National Park in Uganda. A new study indicates that chimps prefer a specific tree for sleeping.
James Akena Reuters/Landov

In the wilds of Africa, chimpanzees consistently choose to make their sleeping nests in a particular tree that offers the "just right" kind of comfort that Goldilocks famously preferred.

That's according to a new study in the journal PLOS ONE that could also bolster a theory that solid shut-eye may have been a key to human evolution.

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6:31pm

Thu April 17, 2014
The Salt

Tabasco And Beer-Flavored: Not Your Easter Bunny's Jelly Beans

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 1:11 pm

Jelly Belly says its most popular flavors include the savory-sweet Buttered Popcorn and Very Cherry.
Meg Vogel/NPR

This Easter, you can drown your sorrows in a glass of Jellybean milk — or with a pile of beer-flavored jelly beans.

The new twists are a sign that jelly beans are continuing their march to candyland domination. Americans buy 16 billion beans in the Easter season alone (mid-February until the actual holiday), according to the National Confectioners Association. The candy even has its own holiday on April 22.

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6:02pm

Thu April 17, 2014
Politics

Obama's Favorite County — At Least When It Comes To Giving Speeches

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 1:11 am

President Obama speaks during an April 7 visit to Bladensburg High School in Bladensburg, Md. It was his fourth visit to Prince George's County in as many months.
Aude Guerrucci-Pool Getty Images

Residents of Prince George's County, Md., might just get sick of hearing "Hail to the Chief." President Obama has visited this county to deliver policy addresses more than any other in his second term.

"Hello Maryland. It's good to see you," the president said enthusiastically in January at a Costco in Lanham, Md. "I love to get outside of the Beltway, even if it is just a few hundred feet away."

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5:30pm

Thu April 17, 2014
Remembrances

Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Who Gave Voice To Latin America, Dies

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 8:06 pm

Admirers ask Gabriel Garcia Marquez --€” seated alongside his wife, Mercedes Barcha €-- to sign books in Santa Marta, Colombia, in 2007.
Alejandra Vega AFP/Getty Images

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America's best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

A Writer Shaped By His Beginnings

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5:30pm

Thu April 17, 2014
Around the Nation

The Ohio Snake Art That's Been Mid-Slither For A Millennium

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 8:06 pm

The Serpent Mound in southern Ohio is 3 feet high and more than 1,300 feet long.
Courtesy of the Ohio Historical Society.

In new installment of the Spring Break series, Noah Adams visits the Serpent Mound in southern Ohio. It's not a burial site; it's a massive, grass-covered effigy of a snake, created a thousand years ago.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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5:07pm

Thu April 17, 2014
The Two-Way

Chelsea Clinton Says She's Pregnant

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:54 pm

Chelsea Clinton co-hosts "Girls: A No Ceilings Conversation," in New York on Thursday. Clinton chose the venue to announce that she and her husband are expecting their first child.
Ted Shaffrey AP

Chelsea Clinton announced Thursday that she and husband Marc Mezvinsky are expecting their first child, also a first grandchild for former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

"Mark and I are very excited that we have our first child arriving later this year," Chelsea Clinton, who is 34, said at a New York event while sitting on a stage with her mother, according to The Associated Press.

Hillary Clinton said she's "really excited" about becoming a grandmother.

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5:03pm

Thu April 17, 2014
Law

When Being Pregnant Also Means Being Out Of A Job

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 8:06 pm

While many women continue to work with little change in their duties while pregnant, others find that pregnancy can be a career liability.
Yuri Arcurs iStockphoto

The workplace has become a more understanding place for pregnant women or new moms these days. Many companies now have lactation rooms and offer more liberal maternity and paternity leave policies than in years past.

But for some women, pregnancy can still be a career liability.

Heather Myers was fresh out of high school and working at a Wal-Mart in Salina, Kan., in 2006 when she found out she was pregnant. She kept a water bottle with her on the sales floor, as her doctor recommended. Then, her supervisor intervened.

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4:57pm

Thu April 17, 2014
Book Reviews

'Bintel Brief' And 'Hellfighters': American Stories, Powerfully Illustrated

A Bintel Brief and The Harlem Hellfighters are two New York Stories. That's why I'm combining them in this review; not because — as some purists still think — they're lesser works of literature because they're graphic novels. If Egyptian hieroglyphics, the Bayeux Tapestry, and Art Spiegelman's 1991 classic, Maus, haven't yet convinced the high-art holdouts of the value of stories told in visual sequence, nothing I say now about these two books is likely to.

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4:57pm

Thu April 17, 2014
Television

'Silicon Valley' Asks: Is Your Startup Really Making The World Better?

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:45 pm

Kumail Nanjiani (from left), Martin Starr, Thomas Middleditch, Zach Woods and T.J. Miller star in Silicon Valley, Mike Judge's new sitcom about young programmers trying to hit it rich.
Isabella Vosmikova HBO

Mike Judge is no stranger to workplace comedy — back in 1999, he wrote and directed the cult classic Office Space, which poked fun at desk job-induced ennui in a 1990s software company.

Now, more than a decade later, Judge continues to find humor in the tech industry. In his new HBO sitcom, Silicon Valley, Judge explores what happens when young computer geeks become millionaires.

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4:57pm

Thu April 17, 2014
Music Reviews

A Duo's Debut Album: A Collaboration From 'The Both'

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

The Both is the name for the duo formed by veteran singer-songwriters Aimee Mann and Ted Leo. "The Both" is also the name of their debut album. The two began performing together in 2012, when Ted Leo was Mann's opening act. Mann began joining Leo onstage during his set. They liked the sound their voices together and started collaborating. Rock critic Ken Tucker has this review of "The Both."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE GAMBLER")

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4:53pm

Thu April 17, 2014
The Two-Way

Nobel Prize-Winning Author Gabriel Garcia Marquez Dies At 87

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:55 pm

Nobel literature laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez greets fans and reporters outside his home in Mexico City on March 6, his birthday.
Eduardo Verdugo AP

Nobel Prize-winning Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez, author of One Hundred Years of Solitude, has died in Mexico City. He was 87.

The Associated Press says:

"Garcia Marquez's magical realist novels and short stories exposed tens of millions of readers to Latin America's passion, superstition, violence and inequality.

"Widely considered the most popular Spanish-language writer since Miguel de Cervantes in the 17th century, Garcia Marquez achieved literary celebrity that spawned comparisons to Mark Twain and Charles Dickens.

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4:44pm

Thu April 17, 2014
Movies

A Story Of Torture And Forgiveness That Spans A Half-Century

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 8:06 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

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4:23pm

Thu April 17, 2014
Environment

Unlikely Partnerships Spring From California Water Crisis

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 7:13 pm

As California farms struggle amid intense drought, farmers are pressing the federal government to help solve a water crisis.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

At a recent rally in Fresno County, Calif., farmers in plaid shirts stood side by side with migrant farmworkers in ball caps, holding signs that read "sin agua, no futuro" and "no water, no food." Fresno is the top agriculture-producing county in the U.S., with more than $6 billion in annual sales.

Protesters argued that farms could go out of business without more water, and there would be mass layoffs. That rhetoric may be familiar, but the two groups' alliance is decidedly unusual.

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4:23pm

Thu April 17, 2014
Health Care

Following Enrollment Deadline, Health Care Focus Turns To States

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 8:06 pm

President Obama met Thursday with insurance company executives and a separate group of insurance regulators from the states, discussing their mutual interest in administering the new health care law.

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