Claudio Sanchez

Former elementary and middle school teacher Claudio Sanchez is an Education Correspondent for NPR. He focuses on the "three p's" of education reform: politics, policy and pedagogy. Sanchez's reports air regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Sanchez joined NPR in 1989, after serving for a year as executive producer for the El Paso, Texas, based Latin American News Service, a daily national radio news service covering Latin America and the U.S.- Mexico border.

From 1984 to 1988, Sanchez was news and public affairs director at KXCR-FM in El Paso. During this time, he contributed reports and features to NPR's news programs.

In 2008, Sanchez won First Prize in the Education Writers Association's National Awards for Education Reporting, for his series "The Student Loan Crisis." He was named as a Class of 2007 Fellow by the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. In 1985, Sanchez received one of broadcasting's top honors, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton, for a series he co-produced, "Sanctuary: The New Underground Railroad." In addition, he has won the Guillermo Martinez-Marquez Award for Best Spot News, the El Paso Press Club Award for Best Investigative Reporting, and was recognized for outstanding local news coverage by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Sanchez is a native of Nogales, Mexico, and a graduate of Northern Arizona University, with post-baccalaureate studies at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

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3:59am

Fri December 19, 2014
NPR Ed

The Administration's College Rating System: How It Looks On Campus

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 1:23 pm

Tuition, room and board at Randolph College in Lynchburg, Va., costs $45,000 a year.
Parker Michels-Boyce Randolph College

It's late afternoon. Most classes at Randolph College are done for the day but students have begun gathering in the lobby of the elegant, century-old main hall.

A student taps on a piano while he and four classmates wait for their philosophy professor. After-hours sessions like these are a key feature of this small, private liberal arts college in Lynchburg, Va.

It markets itself nationally as a "unique, nurturing community of learners," well worth the $45,000 a year in tuition, room and board.

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7:18am

Tue November 11, 2014
NPR Ed

Q&A: Lamar Alexander On Education In The New Congress

Originally published on Tue November 11, 2014 2:45 pm

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., waves after speaking to supporters on Nov. 4 in Knoxville.
Wade Payne AP

Higher education, preschool funding, the Common Core and the future of No Child Left Behind are just a few of the education policies that will be in play under the new Republican-controlled Congress. How will these things change? We called Sen. Lamar Alexander to ask.

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4:16pm

Tue November 4, 2014
NPR Ed

Philadelphia Schools: Another Year, Another Budget Crisis

Originally published on Tue November 4, 2014 6:32 pm

LA Johnson NPR

Trying to figure out why Philadelphia's public schools have been teetering on insolvency the past few years is no easy task.

But let's start with some basic facts. The district, the eighth largest in the nation, is entirely dependent on three sources of money: Almost half of its $2.8 billion budget comes from the city. A little over a third comes from the state. Most of the rest comes from the federal government.

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2:03pm

Tue October 14, 2014
NPR Ed

Identifying The Worst Colleges In America

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 3:22 pm

LA Johnson/NPR

For years,Washington Monthly has been rating and ranking the nation's colleges.

But for its 2014 edition, the magazine has done something new. It has put out a list of what it says are the nation's worst colleges. That is, schools with high tuition, low graduation rates and high student debt rates.

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8:03am

Thu October 2, 2014
NPR Ed

New Orleans Schools Face A Surge Of Unaccompanied Minors

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 8:17 pm

Yashua Cantillano, 14, arrived in New Orleans in June from Tegucigalpa, Honduras. He's now enrolled in a charter school, Carver Prep, on the city's east side.
Mallory Falk/WWNO

For 14-year-old Yashua Cantillano, life in New Orleans is an improvement.

But that's not saying much.

Just three months ago, Yashua was in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, dodging gang members. He says they would drive by his school, guns visible, threatening to kill him, his younger brother — Yashua's whole family.

"We'd hide all day," Yashua says, "and that kept us from going to school."

After crossing the U.S. border illegally, he came to New Orleans and ultimately enrolled at Carver Prep, a small charter school on the city's east side.

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3:23am

Thu September 11, 2014
U.S.

Child Migrants Settle Uneasily In The Big Easy

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 9:05 am

LA Johnson/NPR

Last June, 13-year-old Yashua Cantillano and his 11-year-old brother, Alinhoel, left their uncle's home in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, with a change of clothes in plastic bags, some snacks, water and their mother's phone number scribbled on a piece of paper.

Their guide and protector? Seventeen-year-old Sulmi Cantillano, their step-sister.

With the help of a smuggler, or coyote, Sulmi says, they got to the Mexican border city of Reynosa about 11 miles south of McAllen, Texas. They crossed the Rio Grande and turned themselves in to the U.S. Border Patrol.

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4:44pm

Fri August 29, 2014
Education

New Orleans Enters The Charter School Era

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 12:25 pm

Ninth graders at George Washington Carver Collegiate Academy learn to shake hands and greet each other during the first day of school in New Orleans.
David Gilkey NPR

On Aug. 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina ripped through New Orleans and gutted most of its public schools. Even before the storm, the district was one of the most troubled in the nation.

Today, the New Orleans school system is unlike any other anywhere in the U.S. More than 9 in 10 students this fall are attending charter schools run by dozens of private, nonprofit organizations. Families choose the schools their children will attend, and the neighborhood school is a thing of the past.

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5:00pm

Mon August 11, 2014
Education

New Orleans Charters Prepare For A Big First Day Of School

Originally published on Wed August 13, 2014 2:34 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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6:54pm

Tue July 15, 2014
NPR Ed

Federal Loans Tough To Come By For Community College Students

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 9:50 am

Tuition and fees at most community colleges these days are pretty reasonable but according to a new report, students in a fifth of these schools do not have access to federal student loans.
iStockPhoto

Tuition and fees at most community colleges are pretty reasonable these days, about $3,500 a year. Which is why the vast majority of community college students don't take out loans to cover their costs. But, according to the Institute for College Access and Success, a non-profit advocacy group based in California, nearly a million community college students who do need help paying for school don't have access to federal student loans.

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4:15pm

Tue June 24, 2014
Education

A 'Major Shift' In Oversight Of Special Education

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 7:14 pm

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan says states must ensure progress for students with disabilities.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

The Obama administration said Tuesday that the vast majority of the 6.5 million students with disabilities in U.S. schools today are not receiving a quality education, and that it will hold states accountable for demonstrating that those students are making progress.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced what he calls "a major shift" in how the government evaluates the effectiveness of federally funded special education programs.

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4:06pm

Tue June 17, 2014
Education

Study Delivers Failing Grades For Many Programs Training Teachers

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 8:33 pm

Colleges of education spend more than $6 billion every year preparing classroom teachers, but few students graduate ready to teach, according to a new study.
iStockphoto.com

The nation's teacher-preparation programs have plenty of room for improvement, according to a new report.

A study released today by the National Council on Teacher Quality argues that teaching colleges are too lenient in their admissions criteria and have failed to prepare their students to teach subjects like reading, math and science.

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3:37am

Wed June 11, 2014
NPR Ed

College For Free: Tulsa's Radical Idea

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 9:49 am

Who can say no to a free college education?
iStockPhoto

The average cost of one college year across all degree-granting intuitions in the U.S. was more than $19,000 in 2012, and we don't need to tell you what direction the price is heading. Which means lots of students are now borrowing heavily to make college work. President Obama threw some of them a lifeline earlier this week, with revisions to the government's Pay As You Earn program.

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4:36pm

Mon June 2, 2014
Education

Despite Expansion, Many Pre-K Programs Fail To Reach Immigrant Kids

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 6:50 pm

Most states have embarked on a significant expansion of preschool programs, but a new report says they appear to be missing the kids who need these programs most: low-income, immigrant children.

4:03pm

Thu May 8, 2014
Education

New Rules Aim To Keep School Doors Open For Undocumented Students

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 7:49 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Obama administration today reissued guidelines for America's schools. The goal is to keep states from turning away children who cannot prove that they are in the U.S. legally. A 1982 Supreme Court ruling allowed undocumented students free access to a public education. But even today, some school districts haven't gotten the message.

NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports.

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4:29pm

Wed May 7, 2014
Education

Department Of Education Brings Home A Disappointing Report Card

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 9:59 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Flat, stagnant, static, those are words that the U.S. Department of Education has used to describe the latest reading and math scores for the nation's 12th graders.

As NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports, most high school seniors appear to be graduating without the skills they need to succeed in college or work.

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