Elizabeth Blair

Elizabeth Blair is a Senior Producer on the Arts Desk of NPR News.

On a daily basis, she produces, edits and reports arts and cultural segments that air on NPR News magazines including Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Her recent stories explored the rise of public humiliation in popular culture, consumers' changing media habits and the intersection of the arts and education.

In this position that she has held since 2003, Blair's varied work has included profiles of actor Neil Patrick Harris, rapper K'Naan, and the band Pearl Jam. She has written and produced long-form documentaries on such cultural icons as Paul Robeson and Billie Holiday. Blair oversaw the production of some of NPR's most popular special projects including "50 Great Voices," the NPR series on awe-inspiring voices from around the world and across time in, and the "In Character" series which explored famous American fictional characters.

Over the years, Blair has received several honors for her work including two Peabody Awards and a Gracie.

For three and a half years, Blair lived in Paris, France, where she co-produced Le Jazz Club From Paris with Dee Dee Bridgewater, and the monthly magazine Postcard From Paris.

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3:02am

Mon November 10, 2014
Color Decoded: Stories That Span The Spectrum

Whether Green With Envy Or Tickled Pink, We Live In A Color-Coded World

Originally published on Mon November 10, 2014 11:00 am

An employee at a frozen foods company in eastern Germany checks carrots for quality.
Michael Urban AFP/Getty Images

Red means stop; green means go. You live in a red or a blue state. You feel green with envy, or you're tickled pink. Colors alert, provoke, attract, divide and unite us.

Thinkers from Plato to Einstein to a new cottage industry of color psychologists have studied the importance of color in our daily lives. But, as Joann and Arielle Eckstut write in their book The Secret Language of Color: "Anyone who claims to be an expert on color is a liar."

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5:00pm

Mon August 11, 2014
Fine Art

As Museums Try To Make Ends Meet, 'Deaccession' Is The Art World's Dirty Word

Originally published on Wed August 13, 2014 5:57 pm

Deaccessioning β€” the permanent removal of an object from a museum's collection β€” has been a big issue in Detroit. When the city declared bankruptcy, it had to put all of its assets on the table. Turns out, the most valuable asset was the art collection at the Detroit Institute of Arts.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Sometimes museums get in trouble. Deep trouble. Not because they damage art, or let it get stolen ... but because they sell it. The Delaware Art Museum is the latest target of the art world's ire β€” for selling one painting from its collection to try and tackle a debt, and for revelations in the past few days that two more paintings are up for sale.

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3:39am

Tue August 5, 2014
Television

From 'Good Times' To 'Honey Boo Boo': Who Is Poor On TV?

Originally published on Tue August 5, 2014 10:47 am

The Evans family from Good Times. Bern Nadette Stanis is second from left.
The Kobal Collection

Like it or not, television has the power to shape our perceptions of the world. So what do sitcoms, dramas and reality TV say about poor people?

In life and on TV, "poor" is relative. Take breakfast: For Honey Boo Boo's family, it's microwaved sausage and pancake sandwiches; for children in The Wire's Baltimore ghetto, it's a juice box and a bag of chips before school; and on Good Times, set in the Chicago projects back in the 1970s, it was a healthier choice: oatmeal.

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4:44pm

Thu July 17, 2014
Theater

Actress Elaine Stritch, 'Her Own Greatest Character,' Dies At 89

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 3:19 pm

Stritch first appeared on Broadway in 1944 β€” and was still performing occasionally even at age 89. She is pictured above in 1955.
AP

Elaine Stritch β€” one of Broadway's boldest and brassiest performers β€” has died. With that gravelly voice β€” and those long legs β€” and that utter command of the stage, Stritch was a bona fide Broadway star. Not as a classic leading lady, necessarily, but as the hardened-yet-vulnerable performer audiences couldn't forget. Stritch died of natural causes Thursday morning at her home in Birmingham, Mich. She was 89.

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1:36am

Tue May 27, 2014
Business

Pfizer Drops $119 Billion Bid For AstraZeneca

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 7:57 am

William Vazquez AP

It would have been the biggest deal the pharmaceutical industry has seen in more than a decade. But for now, it's off the table.

Pfizer has withdrawn its offer to buy British drug company AstraZeneca for about $119 billion.

American pharmaceutical giant Pfizer, which makes Lipitor and Viagra, has been circling its smaller rival AstraZeneca for months.

AstraZeneca, which makes Nexium and Crestor, has rejected every offer saying Pfizer undervalues the company, and that it wants to remain independent.

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4:59pm

Mon May 26, 2014
Remembrances

Remembering The 'Father' Of G.I. Joe

Originally published on Mon May 26, 2014 5:43 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block. Now we're going to remember the man who was known as the father of G.I. Joe. Donald Levine was a toy industry executive in the early 1960s, when the iconic action figure stormed playrooms across the country. Levine died of cancer late last week. He was 86. NPR's Elizabeth Blair does this appreciation.

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4:08pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Television

Colbert Plans To Take Up The Late Night Mic For CBS

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:12 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The coveted spot held by David Letterman for 21 years will go to Stephen Colbert. CBS made the announcement today. As NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports, diehard fans of the Emmy Award-winning "Colbert Report" are mourning this news and others are excited to see what the real Colbert has in store.

ELIZABETH BLAIR, BYLINE: First, Stephen Colbert has said he will not be doing "The Late Show" in character, meaning the over-the-top, right-wing narcissistic character he created for Comedy Central.

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5:03pm

Mon March 24, 2014
Television

Fans Of 'The Good Wife' Rocked By [Spoiler Alert]

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 6:46 pm

Matthew Goode (left) as Finn Polmar and Josh Charles (right) as Will Gardner in Sunday night's episode of CBS's The Good Wife.
CBS

The CBS legal drama The Good Wife centers on smart, attractive Chicago lawyer Alicia Florrick. She's "the good wife" because she stood by her politician husband when he cheated on her.

But the show's most compelling story line has always been between Alicia and another lawyer, Will Gardner. And if you don't want to know what happened in that storyline last night, stop reading NOW.

No, Really: Major Spoiler Ahead

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2:06pm

Mon March 10, 2014
The Two-Way

Smithsonian Institution Gets A New Director

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 3:36 pm

Cornell University President David Skorton speaks during a news conference Monday in Washington, D.C.
Carolyn Kaster AP

The new head of the Smithsonian Institution was announced Monday. David Skorton will leave his job as president of Cornell University to become the institution's 13th secretary since its founding in 1846.

Skorton becomes the first physician to lead the Smithsonian. He's a board-certified cardiologist and amateur jazz musician. Most importantly for the Smithsonian, he's a skilled fundraiser. Skorton led a team that raised $5 billion during his eight years at Cornell.

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10:16am

Sat February 8, 2014
Pop Culture

For Top-Flight Animators, The Gag Is An Art All Its Own

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 12:05 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The Lego Movie opened last night in theaters across the country. It's latest example of the magic of animation, filmmakers who bring plastic to life, make animals talk and send toys singing and dancing across a big screen. But animators also love to hurl our most beloved characters over cliffs. They blow them up with dynamite, flatten them with speeding trains. Seconds later, they pop back up and dust themselves off.

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7:06pm

Sun February 2, 2014
Remembrances

Philip Seymour Hoffman: An 'Uncanny' Actor Of Stage And Screen

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 2:53 pm

Hoffman (left) and Eddie Marsan, in a scene from the film God's Pocket, released in January.
Lance Acord AP

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead on Sunday in his Manhattan apartment. He was 46.

Hoffman was steeped in his profession β€” in film, on stage, in the spotlight and behind the scenes.

In 2005, he won the Oscar for best actor for his portrayal of Truman Capote. The movie focuses on Capote's interviews with two murderers on death row for his nonfiction novel In Cold Blood.

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5:22pm

Fri January 24, 2014
Business

In The Super Bowl Ad Game, One Small Business Will Win Big

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 8:55 pm

Super Bowl suspense is building β€” for the game and the commercials. With an audience of over 100 million people, advertisers covet this space, but at a reported $4 million a spot, only the mightiest corporations can afford Super Bowl exposure. This year, though, there's an exception. One lucky little business will get one of those primo slots β€” free.

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5:26pm

Mon January 13, 2014
Arts & Life

Foundations Keep Detroit Art Off The Auction Block

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 8:53 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

A federal bankruptcy judge in Detroit has mediated a deal that could potentially solve two of the city's biggest problems. The plan would raise money for retirees' pension funds and keep masterpieces from the Detroit Institute of Art from being auctioned off. NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports.

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3:20am

Wed December 25, 2013
Arts & Life

Detroit Needs Money. Can A 'Grand Bargain' Save The City's Art?

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:04 pm

Gladioli, Claude Monet, ca. 1876, oil on canvas.
Detroit Institute of Arts

Can wealthy art lovers help save Detroit's pension funds β€” and one of its museums?

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5:24pm

Mon November 25, 2013
Code Switch

What Do We Mean When We Talk About 'Latino Art'?

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 6:42 pm

Radiante, Olga Albizu
Courtesy of the Smithsonian American Art Museum

When the Whitney Museum of American Art announced the artists for its 2014 biennial, people took to the Internet to chime in about who's been included and who's been left out; the last biennial had been blasted for ignoring Latino artists. But when a new show opened at the Smithsonian American Art Museum featuring only Latino artists β€” "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" β€” it was blasted for other reasons.

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