Joel Rose

Joel Rose is a National Desk reporter based at NPR's New York Bureau.

Since joining NPR in 2011, Rose has covered the political, economic, and cultural life of the nation's biggest city. He's reported on the rise of the Occupy Wall Street movement, the fall of the compact disc, and the fast-changing fortunes of New York's elected officials. He's also contributed to NPR's coverage of the Trayvon Martin shooting in Florida, and the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal in Pennsylvania.

When pressing news doesn't keep him busy, Rose likes to report on the collision of the Internet and the entertainment industries, and to profile obscure musicians who should be more famous.

Rose has held a long list of jobs in public radio. Before coming to NPR, he spent ten years in Philadelphia, six of them as a reporter at NPR Member Station WHYY. He's also worked as a producer at KQED in San Francisco and American Routes in New Orleans. His writing has appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer, GOOD Magazine, and the Philadelphia Independent.

His radio reporting has won numerous awards, including a Golden Reel from the National Association of Community Broadcasters for his story about the unlikely comeback of soul singer Howard Tate.

Rose has a bachelor's degree in history and music from Brown University, where he got his start in radio as an overnight jazz DJ at the college station.

Pages

3:55am

Tue February 3, 2015
All Tech Considered

Would FCC Plan Harm Telecom Investment? Even Industry Opinion Is Mixed

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 2:21 pm

Randall Stephenson, chairman and CEO of AT&T, introduces President Obama before the latter's remarks Dec. 3 at the quarterly meeting of the Business Roundtable, a group Stephenson chairs. Stephenson has said that increasing regulation of the broadband industry — as proposed by the president — would have a substantial chilling effect on its investment in infrastructure.
Pool Getty Images

This week figures to be a big one in the debate about how to regulate the Internet.

Yesterday the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission announced he'll try to overrule laws in two states that restrict community-owned broadband networks. Later this week, he's expected to propose exactly what President Obama asked for last year: reclassifying the Internet under regulations known in the parlance of telecom wonks as Title II.

Read more

6:14pm

Wed January 21, 2015
All Tech Considered

The Battle Over Open-Internet Rules Shifts To Congress

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 8:01 pm

President Obama called on the Federal Communications Commission to implement a strict policy of net neutrality and to oppose content providers in restricting bandwidth to customers.
Michael Bocchieri Getty Images

In Tuesday night's State of the Union address, President Obama offered a number of ideas for improving the economy. Among them was a nod to the role the Internet plays in economic development.

"I intend to protect a free and open Internet, extend its reach to every classroom, and every community, and help folks build the fastest networks," Obama said.

Read more

4:24pm

Wed January 7, 2015
Around the Nation

NYPD Commissioner Is A Man Caught In The Middle

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more

8:08am

Sun January 4, 2015
Law

New York Prepares For Slain Officer's Funeral

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 12:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more

3:49am

Thu January 1, 2015
Shots - Health News

Ebola Aid Workers Still Avoiding New York And New Jersey

Originally published on Thu January 1, 2015 10:40 am

Last fall's state-ordered quarantine of nurse Kaci Hickox (shown here with her boyfriend, Theodore Michael Wilbur, in late October) started at the airport in Newark, N.J., then followed her home to Fort Kent, Maine. Hickox treated Ebola patients in Africa but never had the illness.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Sara Back, a nurse practitioner at a public hospital in the Bronx, is not the kind of person to turn down a tough assignment. This month she's heading to Sierra Leone to work a short stint caring for Ebola patients.

"I am beyond ready," she says.

Back is passionate about treating patients suffering from the deadly disease. But she's not so keen on the mandatory 21-day quarantine she faces when she gets home.

"It's definitely a pain in the tush," she says. "I mean, jokingly, my colleagues say, 'Well, we'll see you in, like ... June.' "

Read more

4:21pm

Tue December 23, 2014
Around the Nation

Despite De Blasio's Appeal, Protesters March In New York

Originally published on Tue December 23, 2014 6:26 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:37pm

Mon November 24, 2014
Technology

Half The Battle Over Net Neutrality Is Defining What It Means

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 10:15 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more

5:24pm

Tue November 18, 2014
Goats and Soda

Aid Groups See A Drop-Off In U.S. Health Volunteers To Fight Ebola

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 4:14 pm

Nurses Bridget Mulrooney and Kelly Suter volunteered to work for the International Medical Corps at an Ebola treatment unit in Liberia. IMC is reporting a drop-off in recruits this fall.
Stuart J. Sia International Medical Corps

The federal agency that oversees many American healthcare workers volunteering in Ebola-stricken regions of West Africa says there's been a significant decline in the number of people who are willing to go. International aid groups attribute that drop to the mandatory quarantine rules implemented by New York and New Jersey last month.

Read more

4:42pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Politics

The Campaign That Seems More Crime Drama Than Congressional Race

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 6:27 pm

Congressman Michael Grimm is facing a 20-count federal indictment but despite the charges, Grimm stands a decent chance of being reelected in New York.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

A congressional race that sounds like the plot of a crime movie is playing out in Staten Island, N.Y. Republican Congressman Michael Grimm went undercover as 'Mikey Suits' when he was an FBI agent. Now Grimm is the one facing a 20-count federal indictment. But despite the charges, Grimm stands a decent chance of being reelected next week.

Read more

7:52am

Sat October 25, 2014
Global Health

New Mandatory Quarantines May Drive Away Ebola Volunteers

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 11:57 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:33pm

Fri October 24, 2014
Health

New York City Praised For Response To New Ebola Patient

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 6:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:40am

Wed October 15, 2014
U.S.

'Culture Of Violence' Pervades Rikers' Juvenile Facilities

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 4:19 pm

An inmate at Rikers Island juvenile detention facility carries a plastic fork behind his back as he walks with other inmates. A recent report found that juvenile detainees are subjected to routine violence, both by other inmates and by correction officers.
Julie Jacobson AP

For most of New York, Rikers Island is out of sight and out of mind. It's in the middle of the East River between Queens and the Bronx. There's only one unmarked bridge that leads on and off. But a recent report on violence by correction officers, or COs, was no surprise to those who've spent time there.

Read more

7:40am

Sat September 20, 2014
Environment

Organizers Hope U.N. Climate March Will Be Largest In History

Originally published on Sat September 20, 2014 11:16 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more

11:23am

Sun September 7, 2014
Politics

Cuomo Gets More Of An Opponent Than He Bargained For

Gubernatorial candidate Zephyr Teachout been hammering Gov. Andrew Cuomo for allegedly interfering with the work of his own anti-corruption commission earlier this year.
Mike Groll AP

Gov. Andrew Cuomo was supposed to cruise past next Tuesday's primary election in New York on his way to a second term.

But the powerful Democratic incumbent may have more trouble than many expected. For one thing, his main opponent, a little-known law professor named Zephyr Teachout, is mounting a respectable challenge from the left. For another, Cuomo could potentially wind up with a running mate he doesn't want.

This week, the local cable news channel NY1 tried to host a debate between Cuomo and Teachout. Teachout was the only one to show up.

Read more

4:20pm

Fri September 5, 2014
Men In America

Manliness In Music: The XY Hits The Hi-Fi

Originally published on Sat September 6, 2014 1:29 am

A fan crowd-surfs at the 2014 Wacken Open Air heavy metal music festival in Germany.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Pages