Kristofor Husted

Before joining KBIA in July 2012, Kristofor Husted reported for the science desk at NPR in Washington. There, he covered health, food and environmental issues. His work has appeared on NPR’s health and food blogs, as well as with WNYC, WBEZ and KPCC, among other member stations. As a multimedia journalist, he's covered topics ranging from the King salmon collapse in Northern California to the shutdown of a pollution-spewing coal plant in Virginia. His short documentary, “Angela’s Garden,” was nominated for a NATAS Student Achievement Award by the Television Academy.

Husted was born in Napa, Calif., and received his B.S. in cell biology from UC Davis, where he also played NCAA water polo. He earned an M.S. in journalism from Medill at Northwestern University, where he was honored as a Comer scholar for environmental journalism. 

3:28am

Mon February 3, 2014
Shots - Health News

What's Good For Baby Camels Could Be Good For Human Skin

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 4:17 pm

Camels in Jordan supply the milk for a Missouri startup's skin-care line. The company is studying the milk's anti-inflammatory properties.
iStockphoto

In parts of the Middle East, people drink camel's milk for its nutritional value. It boasts more vitamin C and iron than cow's milk, and it's lower in fat. But in the American Midwest, some people are rubbing camel's milk on their skin — in the form of a skin-care line from Jordan.

Penelope Shihab is the founder of a biotech company in Jordan — and the woman behind the Missouri startup that's working on the skin-care products.

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2:58pm

Tue April 23, 2013
The Salt

Want To Forage In Your City? There's A Map For That

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 11:25 am

Falling Fruit tells you where you can pick peaches and other foods free for the taking around the world.
istockphoto.com

If you really love your peaches and want to shake a tree, there's a map to help you find one. That goes for veggies, nuts, berries and hundreds of other edible plant species, too.

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3:48pm

Thu January 3, 2013
The Salt

Drought Puts The Squeeze On Already Struggling Fish Farms

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 6:10 pm

Catfish swim in a tub outside the Osage Catfisheries office.
Kristofor Husted KBIA News

This year's drought delivered a pricey punch to US aquaculture, the business of raising fish like bass and catfish for food. Worldwide, aquaculture has grown into a $119 billion industry, but the lack of water and high temperatures in 2012 hurt many U.S. fish farmers who were already struggling to compete on a global scale.

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8:53am

Mon September 3, 2012
The Salt

No More Shame: Boxed Wine Now Comes In A High-End Fashion Purse

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 4:14 pm

Vernissage is trying to revamp boxed wine to attract a more sophisticated customer.
Vernissage

Ladies, if the thought of showing up at a party or a picnic with a box of wine seems a little gauche, there's now a product for you: Vernissage's "bag-in-a-bag" of wine. It's boxed wine, shaped like a handbag.

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