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3:36am

Fri February 27, 2015
StoryCorps

Obama To Ambitious Teen: 'You Have This Strength Inside Yourself'

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 11:01 am

President Barack Obama participates in a "My Brother's Keeper" StoryCorps interview with Noah McQueen in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Feb. 20.
Chuck Kennedy The White House

Noah McQueen is part of "My Brother's Keeper," a White House program aimed at young men of color.

His teen years have been rough, and include several arrests and a short period of incarceration. But last week, he was at the White House. The 18-year-old sat down for a StoryCorps interview with President Obama, who wanted to know more about Noah's life.

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3:35am

Fri February 27, 2015
Goats and Soda

Go Behind The Scenes With The Producer Who Made 'Life After Death'

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 12:03 pm

Twins Watta and Fatta Balyon pose for a picture outside their guardian Mamuedeh Kanneh's house.
John W. Poole NPR

They hired a car and drove for 10 hours over the most rutted dirt roads you can imagine, dodging motorbikes, pedestrians and overloaded cars all the way.

It was December. NPR producers John Poole and Sami Yenigun had come to see what happens to a village after Ebola has struck.

Barkedu, in Liberia, is a beautiful place: green and forested. Tall hills start to rise near its border with Guinea. Cows and chickens roam around the village, which is built along the Lofa River. A small stream runs through Barkedu, where people bath and wash their clothes.

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6:29pm

Mon February 23, 2015
Author Interviews

'After Birth' Author On 'Mommy Wars': 'It Doesn't Have To Be This Way'

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 6:40 pm

After Birth by Elisa Albert
Emily Jan NPR

Writer Elisa Albert believes that the so-called "Mommy Wars" have gone on long enough — they are both a distraction and a cop-out, she says. "It's a way of avoiding the actual issues, which is: Women don't have enough support for any of the choices that we make," Albert tells NPR's Kelly McEvers. "We are pitted against each other and ultimately, then, are pitted against ourselves. And everybody is unhappy, and everybody feels judged. It doesn't have to be this way."

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6:44pm

Sun February 22, 2015
Author Interviews

The Woman Behind Marvel's Newest Team Of Heroines

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 2:01 pm

She-Hulk, Dazzler, Medusa and Nico Minoru are some of the characters that make up Marvel's A-Force.
Courtesy of Marvel Entertainment

Fasten your seat belts, true believers. If you haven't flipped through a comic book in a while, you might be in for quite a surprise come May. The entire Marvel multiverse is collapsing.

Forget about seeing the Wolverine we knew any time soon. And the current Ghost Rider? Before long, his current story line will be gone like, well, a ghost. In the new Marvel universe, coming in May, characters and continuities will be reimagined.

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5:18pm

Sun February 22, 2015
Author Interviews

Sonic Youth's Kim Gordon On Marriage, Music And Moving On

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 7:23 pm

Kim Gordon is a founding member of Sonic Youth.
Alisa Smirnova Courtesy of HarperCollins

5:10pm

Sat February 21, 2015
All Tech Considered

Adobe Photoshop: 'Democratizing' Photo Editing For 25 Years

Originally published on Sat February 21, 2015 9:48 pm

"Jennifer In Paradise," a photo of Jennifer Walters in Bora Bora in August 1988, was the first color image to ever be Photoshopped. John Knoll used the image of his then-girlfriend (now wife) to demo Photoshop to potential users.
John Knoll

This week, the photo editing software Adobe Photoshop turned 25 years old. The program is an industry juggernaut — so famous that the word "Photoshop" has come to be synonymous with image manipulation.

But when the software started, says co-creator Thomas Knoll, it was a personal project. He and his brother John started working on the program in the late 1980s.

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5:10pm

Sat February 21, 2015
Music

'That Blew My Mind': Raiding The Lead Belly Vault

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 8:30 am

Lead Belly.
William Gottlieb Courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways and the Library of Congress

The story of Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter reads like a parody of the brutal bluesman biography: Kill a man, go to prison — twice — then appeal for a pardon in a song. According to the legend, Lead Belly's undeniable talent convinced Texas Governor Pat Neff to let him go.

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5:10pm

Sat February 21, 2015
Author Interviews

Exploring The Solar System Through The Eyes Of Robotic Voyagers

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 9:06 am

This NASA file image shows a true color photo of Saturn assembled from images collected by Voyager 2.
HO AFP/Getty Images

The Voyager spacecraft have revolutionized our understanding of our solar system since their launch in 1977. After decades of sending back data on our planetary neighbors, Voyager 1 and 2 are entering new territory: interstellar space.

In a new book, The Interstellar Age: Inside The Forty-Year Voyager Mission, planetary scientist Jim Bell shares the amazing human stories behind the machines' mission.

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5:53pm

Thu February 19, 2015
Author Interviews

From Iran To Comedy Central: Maz Jobrani's Path To 'Middle Eastern Funny Man'

Originally published on Thu February 19, 2015 8:16 pm

Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani performs in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in 2014.
Kamran Jebreili AP

After Sept. 11, President George Bush made a speech about America's enemies — Iran, Iraq and North Korea — in which he referred to them as the "Axis of Evil." At first, that name worried Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani. But then he decided to do what he always does: laugh about it. He and some friends even started the Axis of Evil Comedy Tour, which featured comedians of Middle Eastern descent.

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3:23am

Thu February 19, 2015
Parallels

For The First Time, An Afghan First Lady Steps Into The Spotlight

Originally published on Thu February 19, 2015 10:51 am

Lebanese-born Rula Ghani is Afghanistan's first lady. The wife of newly elected Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has her own office in the presidential palace and intends to play a prominent role in public life.
Emily Jan NPR

Afghanistan was a different world when Rula Ghani moved there from Lebanon as a newlywed in the 1970s. Untouched by war, its small middle class was open to the wider world.

She had met her husband, Ashraf, while studying political science at the American University of Beirut. He was an Afghan Muslim; she, a Lebanese Christian.

They would go on to make a life together — first in Afghanistan, then in America, where she got a degree from Columbia University and became an American citizen, and he taught at Johns Hopkins before moving on to the World Bank.

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6:21pm

Wed February 18, 2015
Jazz Night In America

Christian McBride On 'A Love Supreme' And Its Descendants

Originally published on Wed February 18, 2015 9:04 pm

John Coltrane during the recording of A Love Supreme in December 1964.
Chuck Stewart Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Christian McBride remembers very well the first time he heard A Love Supreme, the John Coltrane classic that turns 50 this month. The bassist, composer and host of NPR's Jazz Night in America was in high school in Philadelphia, and had grown friendly with the staff at record store he passed on his daily commute.

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12:35pm

Wed February 18, 2015
Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Are America's Best Days Behind It?

Josef Joffe, author of The Myth of America's Decline, says the U.S. remains a world leader in education, economic performance and innovation.
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Is America in decline? Or an unparalleled leader on the global stage? Is the nation coping well with the challenges of the 21st century — from health care and education to the threat of terrorism — or is it falling behind other world powers?

Some argue that, while other developed nations have watched their share of global GDP shrink, the United States has remained an economic powerhouse. The U.S. military is unrivaled, they add, the world's top universities are American and the nation remains a leader in technological innovation.

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11:10am

Tue February 17, 2015
Books

A Berkeley Student Comes Home In 'Braggsville,' With Consequences

Originally published on Sat February 14, 2015 1:29 pm

D'aron Davenport feels like a catfish out of his pond when he leaves his Georgia town of about 700 people to go to school in Berkeley, Calif. But within just a few months, it's his hometown that becomes a little hard to understand in his own, changed eyes.

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6:20pm

Sun February 15, 2015
Music

The Doctor Is In: Eddie Henderson On Life As 'The Funk Surgeon'

Eddie Henderson's latest album is Collective Portrait.
Jimmy Katz Courtesy of the artist

5:07pm

Sun February 15, 2015
My Big Break

Fake It Till You Make It, Then Come Clean: A Sportscaster's Big Break

Originally published on Sun February 15, 2015 6:20 pm

Before a Lakers game this season, Adrián García Márquez and the rest of the TWC Deportes crew tapes a pre-game intro.
Nadia Gonzalez TWC Deportes

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Before he called play-by-play for the Los Angeles Lakers, before he called the Olympics, before he called the World Series, before he called Monday Night Football, sportscaster Adrián García Márquez was handing out flyers and bumper stickers for a hip-hop station in San Diego.

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