Richard Winham

Afternoon Music Host, Around & About Producer

Host and producer of the Afternoon Music program, Richard was born in London. He has lived in the United States since the early 1970s.  He moved to the US to find a job in radio. He has worked in both commercial and public radio ever since. Richard has been with WUTC since 1987; his show offers a freewheeling mix of music and interviews with musicians and other movers and shakers within our community, as well as visiting musicians and artists from across the country.

Ways to Connect

Two of the artists whose work is currently on display at Reflections Gallery on Lee Highway are inspired by the Tennessee River, but their work couldn’t be more different. Susan Parks creates intricate patterns using tiny beads, while Jim Tucker creates expansive renderings of the water and the landscape along the river. Richard Winham talked to Jim Tucker and Susan Parks about their work.  

As Jane Lupton sees it, The Houston Museum in Chattanooga is an “unappreciated treasure.”. Mrs. Lupton has been a volunteer member of the museum’s board for several decades. Along with her friend, Caroline Cavett, she also volunteers her time helping to run the museum dedicated solely to the collection amassed by Mrs. Anna Safley Houston during her remarkable life in the first half of the last century.

The Rock City 4 are one of two barbershop harmony quartets available to sing for your valentine. They will come to his or her place of work or home, sing them a song chosen by you and present them with a rose and a box of chocolates. Richard Winham joined them in the studio as each member of the quartet sang his favorite song.

  The statistics on military veterans suicides are a national tragedy. A group of songwriters in Nashville made the decision several years ago to do whatever they could to help. They started a program called Operation Song in which veterans are encouraged to share their memories are then taught how to turn them into a song. The program has been here in Chattanooga for about a year. Beginning today we are going to be talking to some of the veterans in the program and sharing the songs they have written.

This Saturday night, January 23, the Bessie Smith Hall is hosting an evening of the blues with Drew Sterchi and Blues Tribe. The concert will also feature Husky Burnette, Marlow Drive and The Jon Harris Band. Drew Sterchi and Blues Tribe will headline the concert playing a set celebrating the history of the blues from its roots in the early part of the last century through to today. Richard Winham sat down with Drew Sterchi and his niece Virginia Sterchi as they played a couple of the songs from the show.  

An estimated 22 veterans of the U.S. military commit suicide every day. That startling statistic was first reported by USA Today in February, 2013. Little has changed in the interim, but a local non-profit is trying to help veterans in the Chattanooga area. Richard Winham talked to Bobbie Allison-Standefer, co-founder of Heartland Therapeutic Programs about an innovative program called Operation Song which is helping veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder cope with life after the military.

This Saturday evening December 12th at 7:30, The Choo Choo Chorus is presenting Christmas Memories, a concert of close harmony, “barbershop singing,” featuring several quartets, a men’s chorus, a women’s chorus, and as a finale, all of the singers together—more than eighty voices singing songs for the season. One of the quartets featured in Saturday night’s concert–The Rock City 4— stopped by the studio on Tuesday to give us a preview of the show. 

Cheryl Jackson has been sick for most of her life. She is now in her early 40’s and it is only in the last two years that she has been able to count on relatively good health.

The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Percussion Ensemble’s annual year-end concert called Beat Hunger is set for this Sunday November 22 and Monday November 23 at 7:30 in the UTC Fine Arts Center. That it’s scheduled for two successive nights is a testament to its popularity. Richard Winham talked to Dr. Monte Coulter, the director of the percussion program here at UTC. He told him the original impetus for the increasingly popular concerts came from seeing homeless people on the streets in the neighborhood surrounding UTC.  

SoundCorps, a local non-profit whose goal is to “build Chattanooga’s music economy” is the result of two years' work, according to the executive director, Stratton Tingle. In the summer of 2014, a group of music business researchers from Austin, Texas were invited to Chattanooga to measure music’s impact on the city’s economy. Armed with the results of that study, Stratton Tingle formed a board and began raising money to establish SoundCorps as a resource for music professionals in Chattanooga.

  The exhibition now up at Reflections Gallery on Lee Highway in Chattanooga is called Trees and Skies. Among the artists whose work is included in the exhibition are Carol Hobbs and Mike Ivey. Richard Winham went over to the gallery to see their paintings and to talk to them about their work.

Like many young married couples, Santhosh and Susan Mathews were delighted when Susan became pregnant for the first time. But when they went in for a routine ultrasound they were devastated when the doctor told them their baby had serious birth defects and would probably be still born. But when one doctor after another suggested they should abort the baby, they were steadfast in their resolve to carry the baby to term.

  In a new book on Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken,” David Orr, the poetry critic for The New York Times, contends that it’s a poem “everyone loves and almost everyone gets wrong.” WUTC's Richard Winham talked to David Orr about Robert Frost and found that the poet, like his poetry, was almost often misunderstood and, equally, underestimated.  

The Ensemble Nagata Shachu, a group of five musicians from Toronto, is coming to Chattanooga to play in the Patten Performance Series on Tuesday, September 15. The music they play fuses centuries old Japanese folk music with contemporary rock, jazz and minimalism. The group’s leader and principal composer, Kyoshi Nagata, talked to Richard Winham.  

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