Richard Winham

Afternoon Music Host, Around & About Producer

Host and producer of the Afternoon Music program, Richard was born in London. He has lived in the United States since the early 1970s.  He moved to the US to find a job in radio. He has worked in both commercial and public radio ever since. Richard has been with WUTC since 1987; his show offers a freewheeling mix of music and interviews with musicians and other movers and shakers within our community, as well as visiting musicians and artists from across the country.

Ways to Connect

As part of the on-going series Crafted by Southern Hands in Warehouse Row, two print shops are going to demonstrating the hands on art of letter press printing on Friday evening beginning at 5:30 in Warehouse Row. As well as the opportunity to try your hand at printing, the reception will also be offering  local food from Champy’s and Southern Burger and handcrafted beers from the Chattanooga Brewing Company.  

Haiti is the poorest country in the Americas. When local cardiologist Mitchell Mutter first began visiting the island in 1988, 25% of the children on the island were starving. After visiting the island on week-long medical missions for seven years working in chaotic conditions with few resources treating as many people as he could, Dr. Mutter reached a crossroads.

Despite the best efforts of Mutter and his colleagues, a 3-year-old child he’d been treating for malnutrition died in his arms. It was at that point he realized that he and his colleagues would never be able to correct the terrible conditions on the island by themselves. After months of agonizing over the problem he decided to form an organization called Children’s Nutrition Program of Haiti so that, as he put it, “Haitians can help Haitians to solve the problems of health, economics, infrastructure, and literacy.”

Fifteen years later their work is beginning to bear fruit. 

 

   Having produced the Patten Performances series at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga for six years now, Bob Boyer is confident he has the series back on track. When he took over ticket sales were lackluster and the series was moribund. For the first three years he booked sure-fire acts, and slowly began re-building the audience for the heritage fine arts program.

 A documentary about the band Big Star will be screened at Chattanooga's Barking Legs Theatre Saturday, August 10th at 8:30.

The Open Press, a project started by Matt Greenwell, head of the Art department at UTC, and Paul Rustand, the creative director at Widgets and Stone, a local design company, resulted from their mutual passion for hands-on creativity. They are both comfortable using the tools and techniques of the digital age, but at the same time they both have a yen for a time when everything moved a little more slowly, and the work produced had the immediately recognizable stamp of an artisanal, made by hand product. Not necessarily perfect, but(for them) beautiful in its imperfection.

"At-risk" students are the kids most likely (not) to succeed. They are the first person in their family to attend university. They typically come from low-income single parent homes and, as if that wasn't enough, they often suffer from a physical, emotional, or intellectual disability. The transition from high school to college is tough for any 18 year-old, but for these young men and women the obstacles are often insurmountable. Lucky--very, very lucky--are those who manage to secure a place in Shirl Gholston's Student Support Services.

Jessica Nunn is a gifted musician. She placed first on viola in 2005 in the annual statewide competition organized by the Tennessee Music Education Association. But while she is a gifted performer, Jessica is equally enthusiastic about teaching. 

  

  In this half-hour special produced by WUTC 88.1 FM, Richard Winham, Mike Miller, Bob Stagner, Bruce Kaplan, Ann Law, David Smotherman and Tom Landis remember Dennis Palmer, who passed away unexpectedly in February 2013.  Palmer and Stagner co-founded the Shaking Ray Levis, an influential avant-garde improvisational music duo active in Chattanooga and around the world since the 1980s.  Palmer was also a visual artist, teacher and storyteller. 

“I don’t ever talk to anybody who’s older than me,” John Flansburgh says in this interview with WUTC 88.1 FM’s Richard Winham.  Both Flansburgh and Winham have been in the music business for decades.  Winham, the host of WUTC’s afternoon music show, started his radio career in 1972.  Flansburgh’s music career began in 1982, when he and John Linnell founded the band They Might Be Giants.  In this extended, informal conversation, Winham doesn’t exactly interview Flansburgh–instead, these two music-industry veterans wind up interviewing each other, comparing their musical tastes and contrastin

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