Richard Winham

Host & Producer

Host and producer of the Afternoon Music program, Richard was born in London. He has lived in the United States since the early 1970s.  He moved to the US to find a job in radio. He has worked in both commercial and public radio ever since. Richard has been with WUTC since 1987; his show offers a freewheeling mix of music and interviews with musicians and other movers and shakers within our community, as well as visiting musicians and artists from across the country.

Ways to Connect

Chattanooga’s annual Lighted Boats Parade starts November 29th at 7 p.m. It’s been a Chattanooga tradition ushering in the Christmas season for longer than its current organizer Carla Pritchard can remember. She told WUTC's Richard Winham she first saw it when she was a teenager.

Let Beauty Awaken is an initiative spearheaded by four local high school students. The idea originated with Thomas West. Thomas, a senior at McCallie, is a singer. After performing on the NPR show, From The Top, he performed at a local public school. While he was there he became painfully aware of the lack of funding for the arts and music in local public schools and determined then and there to do something about it.

Clearspring Yoga is hosting an open house from 12 p.m. until 4 p.m. on Saturday, November 23rd. Along with free ½ hour long introductory classes, they’ll be offering massages and energy healing. Richard Winham talked to Anthony Crutcher and Sallie Beckes, who told him the practice has changed dramatically since she first took classes from a very strict teacher in Louisiana in the 1970’s.

The ROTC program at UTC has formed a partnership with the Eastern Band of Cherokee in North Carolina.  UTC has established an internship program for graduates from the Cherokee school, and athletes from the school are being encouraged to try out for UTC’s football program.  WUTC’s Richard Winham speaks to Major Robert Ricks from UTC and Lynne Harlan, a public relations coordinator with the Eastern Band of Cherokee.

On November 7th, Reflections Gallery on Lee Highway is hosting a reception for the artists featured in the upcoming exhibition, Fine Art Landscapes. All of the paintings in the exhibition are by local artists, one of whom, Lee Fritch, talked to Richard Winham about his life and work.  The exhibition will run from November 2013 to January 2014.

In the relatively short time she has been in Chattanooga, Janis Hashe has realized several of her goals, including establishing a repertory company that has presented a number of Shakespeare's plays in a variety of locations such as Coolidge Park and Grace Episcopal Church. She also works as an editor for local weekly The Pulse, and teaches classes on theater at Chattanooga State. But one goal has eluded her for a long time.

For the past three years, The Camphouse has slowly been growing its reputation as both a gourmet coffee shop and an ideal listening room for acoustic music.

Let us work not as colored people nor as white people for the narrow benefit of any group alone, but together, as American citizens, for the common good of our common city, our common country.” –- Ruth Standish Baldwin

Fifty-eight years ago, a Swiss photographer, Robert Frank, visited Chattanooga and photographed people going about their daily business downtown. He took fascinating snapshots of everyday life in 1955. But much more fascinating, at least for local photojournalist Billy Weeks, is that Frank failed to get any information about the people he photographed.

Go!Fest is an annual celebration for everyone. Too often people with disabilities are left out of the party because it’s assumed they can’t or won’t fit in. But as anyone who has attended Go!Fest for the past eight years can attest, that’s all wrong. Most people with a disability—physical or intellectual—want nothing more than to be treated just like anybody else.

The Center for Mindful Living, a non-profit center dedicated to teaching and supporting mindful practices, is hosting an open house on Sunday, September 8th from 3 until 5. In a press release from the center, mindfulness is summarized as “the practice of being present and accepting ourselves and others without judgment or fear.”

The 4000 square foot facility is divided into four offices as well as open spaces including a meditation and contemplation room with an adjacent outdoor garden, as well as an education studio, a library and a kitchen.

As part of the on-going series Crafted by Southern Hands in Warehouse Row, two print shops are going to demonstrating the hands on art of letter press printing on Friday evening beginning at 5:30 in Warehouse Row. As well as the opportunity to try your hand at printing, the reception will also be offering  local food from Champy’s and Southern Burger and handcrafted beers from the Chattanooga Brewing Company.  

Haiti is the poorest country in the Americas. When local cardiologist Mitchell Mutter first began visiting the island in 1988, 25% of the children on the island were starving. After visiting the island on week-long medical missions for seven years working in chaotic conditions with few resources treating as many people as he could, Dr. Mutter reached a crossroads.

Despite the best efforts of Mutter and his colleagues, a 3-year-old child he’d been treating for malnutrition died in his arms. It was at that point he realized that he and his colleagues would never be able to correct the terrible conditions on the island by themselves. After months of agonizing over the problem he decided to form an organization called Children’s Nutrition Program of Haiti so that, as he put it, “Haitians can help Haitians to solve the problems of health, economics, infrastructure, and literacy.”

Fifteen years later their work is beginning to bear fruit. 

 

   Having produced the Patten Performances series at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga for six years now, Bob Boyer is confident he has the series back on track. When he took over ticket sales were lackluster and the series was moribund. For the first three years he booked sure-fire acts, and slowly began re-building the audience for the heritage fine arts program.

 A documentary about the band Big Star will be screened at Chattanooga's Barking Legs Theatre Saturday, August 10th at 8:30.

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