Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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1:26pm

Fri December 12, 2014
The Two-Way

Wealth Gap Between Races Widened During Recession, Study Says

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 3:50 pm

Occupy Wall Street protesters join a labor union rally in Foley Square before marching on Zuccotti Park in New York's Financial District in 2011. A new report shows that wealth inequality between whites and nonwhites grew during the Great Recession.
Jason DeCrow AP

The Great Recession has widened the wealth gap among white, black and Hispanic Americans, with median net worth in white households increasing to 13 times that for African-Americans, a new Pew Research Center study shows.

The study also shows that from 2007 to 2013, the wealth of white households has grown to 10 times that of Hispanic households.

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10:46am

Fri December 12, 2014
The Two-Way

Chicago's Orphaned Otter 'Pup 681' Gets A Real Name

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 2:15 pm

"Pup 681" during a feeding at the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago.
Brenna Hernandez Shedd Aqarium

An orphaned southern sea otter pup that was rescued from the California coast and ended up at Chicago's Shedd Aquarium might well be over the moon about her new name: Luna.

The otter had been designated "Pup 681" by the aquarium, which held a contest to name her. More than 10,000 votes were cast, and the name Luna beat out Cali, Ellie, Poppy and Ana.

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9:27am

Fri December 12, 2014
The Two-Way

Climate Sticking Point: Who Cuts And By How Much?

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 2:37 pm

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivers a speech Thursday at the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru. A major sticking point remains over how to divide greenhouse emissions targets.
Rodrigo Abd AP

U.N. talks on global warming are wrapping up in Peru, but a divide between rich and poor countries and how to divvy up targets to reduce greenhouse gases is a key sticking point that has remained unresolved.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has acknowledged that the issue is "hard fought and ... complex," but he says it is crucial that the targets be agreed on before next year's summit in Paris. The talks in Peru end today.

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4:27pm

Sun December 7, 2014
The Two-Way

Chlorine Gas Leak In Chicago Disrupts 'Furries' Convention

Originally published on Mon December 8, 2014 12:36 pm

Frederic Cesbron (right) and Maxim Durand walk on the street outside the Hyatt Regency O'Hare hotel in Rosemont, Ill., on Sunday. Thousands of people were evacuated earlier after a chlorine gas leak at the hotel, which is hosting the 2014 Midwest FurFest convention.
Nam Y. Huh AP

Several thousand hotel guests, many of them conventiongoers dressed as animal characters, were forced to evacuate a suburban Chicago hotel early this morning after a chlorine gas leak was detected. Nineteen people who complained of dizziness and nausea were treated and released from the hospital, according to The Associated Press.

The Chicago Tribune reports:

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2:41pm

Sun December 7, 2014
The Two-Way

Syria Says Israeli Warplanes Strike Targets Near Damascus

Syrian state media say Israeli planes hit government-controlled zones in and around Damascus in what independent observers have said was an apparent effort to target Hezbollah arms shipments.

"The Israeli enemy committed aggression against Syria by targeting two safe areas in Damascus province, in all of Dimas and near the Damascus International Airport," state television said, adding that there were no casualties, according to Reuters.

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12:45pm

Sun December 7, 2014
The Two-Way

'Washington Post' Reporter, Detained For Months In Iran, Is Charged

Originally published on Mon December 8, 2014 7:27 am

Jason Rezaian, an Iranian-American correspondent for The Washington Post, smiles as he attends a presidential campaign even for President Hassan Rouhani in Tehran in 2013. Rezaian, who was arrested in July, was charged by Iran on Saturday.
Vahid Salemi AP

Jason Rezaian, The Washington Post's bureau chief in Tehran who has been held by the Iranian government for more than four months, was formally charged over the weekend, but the specifics are not yet known, his newspaper reports.

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9:54am

Sun December 7, 2014
The Two-Way

U.S. Reportedly Unaware Of Second Hostage Ahead Of Failed Rescue

Originally published on Sun December 7, 2014 10:33 pm

South African Pierre Korkie was killed in a failed rescue attempt along with American photojournalist Luke Somers. U.S. officials were reportedly unaware that Korkie was being held along with Somers nor that arrangements had already been made for his release.
AP

Update at 12:05 p.m. ET

More details are trickling in out about this weekend's failed attempt to rescue American photojournalist Luke Somers from his al-Qaida captors in Yemen.

Somers, 33, was held along with a South African teacher, Pierre Korkie; both were killed by their kidnappers when U.S. Navy SEALs were detected before they were able to snatch the captives.

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8:51am

Sun December 7, 2014
The Two-Way

6 Gitmo Detainees Transferred To Uruguay, U.S. Says

Originally published on Sun December 7, 2014 2:19 pm

Cooperative captives conduct afternoon prayers inside a communal cellblock at Camp 6 last month at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Six long-time detainees of the prison have been transferred to Uruguay.
Walter Michot MCT/Landov

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

Six men long detained at Guantanamo Bay – four Syrians, one Tunisian and one Palestinian – were transferred this morning to Uruguay in a deal forged by the White House to reduce the inmate population at the controversial prison, which President Obama has promised to close.

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8:05am

Sun December 7, 2014
The Two-Way

Protests Over Police Killings Turn Violent In Berkeley, Calif.

A protester flees as police officers try to disperse a crowd comprised largely of student demonstrators during a protest against police violence in the U.S., in Berkeley, California early Sunday.
Noah Berger Reuters/Landov

Police in Berkeley, Calif., used smoke, flares and rubber bullets against demonstrators who turned unruly overnight amid rallies to protest the police killings of unarmed black men in Missouri and New York.

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2:12pm

Sat December 6, 2014
The Two-Way

DOJ To Issue New Federal Rules On Profiling

Originally published on Sat December 6, 2014 4:14 pm

A TSA agent checks a bag at a security checkpoint area at Midway International Airport last month. The new federal government guidelines on racial and religious profiling won't apply to the TSA.
Nam Y. Huh AP

The Justice Department is preparing to release new guidelines for some federal agents that would prohibit them from using such factors as religion or sexual orientation to profile individuals, but the new policy would not apply at airports or border crossings.

NPR's Carrie Johnson says the DOJ has been considering the change, expected out any day, for the past five years.

"They will add some new categories that are prohibited, like sexual orientation and religion," Carrie tells Weekend All Things Considered.

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12:22pm

Sat December 6, 2014
The Two-Way

LAPD Says It Will Investigate Abuse Claim Against Cosby

Originally published on Sun December 7, 2014 1:09 pm

Judy Huth, left, appears at a news conference with attorney Gloria Allred outside the Los Angeles Police Department's Wilshire Division station on Friday. Huth says she was drugged and raped by comedian Bill Cosby in 1974 when she was 15 years old.
Anthony McCartney AP

Los Angeles police say they will investigate a woman's claims that in the mid-1970s at the age of 15, she was molested by comedian Bill Cosby.

The Associated Press says:

"The investigation was opened Friday after Judy Huth, who is suing Cosby for sexual battery, met with detectives for 90 minutes, Officer Jane Kim said.

"Huth's civil suit claims Cosby forced her to perform a sex act on him in a bedroom of the Playboy Mansion around 1974 when she was underage."

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9:53am

Sat December 6, 2014
The Two-Way

Key Al-Qaida Leader Reportedly Killed In Pakistani Raid

Adnan Shukrijumah is shown in these undated images provided by the FBI. The suspected al-Qaida operative who lived for more than 15 years in the U.S., was reportedly killed in a raid by the Pakistani military.
Anonymous AP

A top al-Qaida leader who allegedly planned to bomb passenger trains in New York and London has been killed in a raid by Pakistani troops near the Afghan border, according to the government in Islamabad.

A statement by Pakistan's Inter-Services Public Relations said Adnan Shukrijumah was killed in the raid in the Sheen Warsak region of South Waziristan in west central Pakistan.

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8:35am

Sat December 6, 2014
The Two-Way

Hagel: 10,800 Troops To Stay In Afghanistan After Dec. 31

Originally published on Sat December 6, 2014 2:01 pm

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel is greeted by Gen. John F. Campbell (right) after arriving in Kabul on Saturday. Hagel announced that an additional 1,000 U.S. troops would remain behind in the country after Dec. 31.
Mark Wilson AP

An additional 1,000 U.S. troops will remain in Afghanistan for the first several months of 2015, leaving 10,800 in the country at the start of the year, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel told reporters at a briefing in Kabul today.

According to a revised drawdown schedule, the U.S. contingent was to have numbered 9,800, but Hagel said "the president's authorization will not change our troops' missions, or the long-term timeline for our drawdown."

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5:38pm

Fri December 5, 2014
The Two-Way

Coming Soon To A Filling Station Near You: $1.99 Gasoline

Originally published on Fri December 5, 2014 5:50 pm

Gas prices in Oklahoma City have dipped under $2.
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

The photo above isn't from the archives. It was taken this week in Oklahoma City, where the price of regular gas has fallen under $2 a gallon. The last time that happened anywhere in the U.S. was in July 2010.

The OnCue filling station is the first in the country to drop its price below the $2/gallon threshold.

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3:59pm

Fri December 5, 2014
The Two-Way

EU Court Orders France To Compensate Somali Pirates

Originally published on Fri December 5, 2014 5:35 pm

Zodiac commando boats arrive at the rear of the French luxury yacht Le Ponant, whose crew was held hostage by pirates, in April 2008. The French navy frigate Le Commandant Bouan is seen in the background, off Somalia's coast.
Reuters/Landov

The European Court of Human Rights has ordered France to pay up to 7,000 euros in compensation to each of nine Somali pirates who were detained after hijacking two French yachts in the Gulf of Aden in 2008.

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