Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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10:43am

Sun June 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Pakistan Gunmen Kill Foreign Climbers In Brazen Attack

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 1:05 pm

A 2003 photograph of majestic Nanga Parbat, one of a number of 8,000-plus-meter peaks that attract the most adventurous Himalayan mountaineers.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

(This story was last updated at 10:40 a.m. ET)

Armed assailants attacked a hotel at a Himalayan base camp in Pakistan, gunning down nine foreign climbers and a local guide as the group prepared for an ascent of one of the world's tallest peaks.

NPR's Philip Reeves reports that Ukrainians and Chinese climbers, as well as a Pakistani guide, were killed in the attack at 26,246-foot Nanga Parbat, about 150 miles northeast of Pakistan's capital, Islamabad.

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8:43am

Sun June 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Federal Safety Officials To Investigate Ohio Air Show Crash

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 12:19 pm

Wing walker Jane Wicker performs at the Vectren Air Show just before crashing on Saturday. She and pilot Charlie Schwenker were killed.
Thanh V. Tran Associated Press

Federal air safety officials say they will investigate the fiery crash of a stunt plane at an Ohio air show that killed the pilot and a wing walker.

Thousands of spectators at the Vectren Air Show near Dayton, Ohio, watched on Saturday as the biplane, with wing walker Jane Law Wicker, 46, and pilot Charlie Schwenker, 64, careened into the ground and exploded during a low-altitude maneuver. No one in the audience was hurt.

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7:56am

Sun June 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Ecuador Says NSA Leaker Has Asked For Asylum

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 5:20 pm

A TV screen shows a news report of Edward Snowden at a shopping mall in Hong Kong on Sunday.
Vincent Yu Associated Press

(This story was last updated at 5:17 p.m. ET)

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor accused of leaking classified surveillance information, has asked Ecuador for asylum, the country's foreign minister says.

Snowden left Hong Kong earlier Sunday bound for a "third country," the government in the Asian hub said. He later landed in Moscow.

Ecuadorian Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino Aroca, who is on an official visit to Vietnam, said:

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3:43pm

Sat June 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Stunt Plane Crashes At Air Show, Killing Pilot, Wing Walker

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 8:55 pm

A stunt biplane crashed and burst into flames at an air show in Dayton, Ohio, killing the pilot and a stunt wing walker, authorities said.

A spokeswoman for the Dayton International Airport, Linda Hughes, and Ohio State Highway Patrol Lt. Anne Ralston confirmed the deaths to The Associated Press.

The crash happened at around 12:45 p.m. at the Vectren Air Show near Dayton, the AP says. No spectators were injured.

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2:50pm

Sat June 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Is This Dog Really That Ugly?

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 4:41 pm

Walle, a beagle-basset mix, won the 25th annual World's Ugliest Dog competition in Petaluma, Calif., on Friday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

We don't mean to be offensive, but someone has to say it: Walle, a 4-year-old beagle-basset mix who was just crowned the 2013 World's Ugliest Dog, is just NOT that ugly.

In fact, Walle is downright cute.

There's something not quite right in Petaluma, Calif., where the annual competition is held. Genuinely ugly (and, in our opinion, totally deserving) Icky, Josie, Rascal and Mugly — all Chinese cresteds — were shut out.

Even a pug named Penny seems more deserving.

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12:15pm

Sat June 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Judge In Zimmerman Trial Bars Audio Experts' Testimony

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 3:01 pm

Judge Debra Nelson addresses concerns from the state and defense during a pretrial hearing on Friday.
Pool Getty Images

A judge in the murder trial of George Zimmerman has excluded testimony from two audio experts who've suggested that Trayvon Martin can be heard screaming on a 911 call moments before the unarmed teen was fatally shot.

Judge Debra Nelson issued the 12-page ruling on Saturday after hearing days of arguments on whether to allow the testimony.

The Associated Press says one expert ruled out Zimmerman as the screamer and another said it was Martin. Defense experts argued there was not enough audio to determine whom the screams are coming from.

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11:27am

Sat June 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Brazil's President Offers Carrot And Stick To Protesters

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 2:16 pm

Students from the eastern city of Sao Paulo protest on Friday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff has pledged a nationwide overhaul of public transportation, improved funding for schools and a crackdown on corruption in response to sometimes violent anti-government protests that have roiled the country for the past week.

In a 10-minute address broadcast on Friday, Rousseff broke her silence on the protests, saying she would spend more money on public transportation and divert some of the country's oil revenues to pay for education, The Associated Press reported. She also addressed widespread anger over government corruption.

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10:20am

Sat June 22, 2013
The Two-Way

'Friends Of Syria' Countries Meet To Map Out Arming Rebels

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 1:49 pm

Secretary of State John Kerry (front row, third from right) poses with foreign ministers of the "Friends of Syria" in Doha, Qatar.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Update At 11:30 a.m. ET:

Secretary of State John Kerry called the current situation in Syria "unacceptable by anyone's standard" and lashed out at the government of President Bashar al-Assad for using Hezbollah in the fight against rebels.

"Assad chose to raise the stakes militarily," Kerry said. "He chose to attack the Syrian people, but this time using Iranian supporters and using Hezbollah, which is a terrorist organization.

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7:57am

Sat June 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Snowden Extradition Could Get Snarled In Hong Kong Courts

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 8:52 pm

A banner shows support for Edward Snowden, in Hong Kong on Monday.
Philippe Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

National Security Advisor Tom Donilon tells CBS News that Washington has asked Hong Kong to turn over NSA leaker Edward Snowden under the terms of a 1998 extradition treaty between the two governments.

"Hong Kong has been a historically good partner of the United States in law enforcement matters and we expect them to comply with the treaty in this case," Donilon said.

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4:36pm

Fri June 21, 2013
The Two-Way

Octogenarian Heir To Astor Fortune Begins Prison Term

Anthony Marshall, the son of the late New York philanthropist Brooke Astor, leaves court in 2009 after his sentencing hearing.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Anthony Marshall, the 89-year-old heir to the Brooke Astor fortune, is heading to prison in New York after exhausting appeals in his 2009 conviction for defrauding his famous mother.

A judge in Manhattan ordered Marshall to begin serving the one- to three-year prison term on charges that he exploited his philanthropist mother's ailing mental health to loot her millions. She died in 2007 at the age of 105.

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3:16pm

Fri June 21, 2013
The Two-Way

James Comey Nominated To Be New FBI Director

President Obama speaks Friday during a news conference to announce his nomination of James Comey to become FBI director.
Win McNamee Getty Images

President Obama has formally nominated James Comey, a registered Republican and former Justice Department official under President George W. Bush, to become the next FBI director. If he's confirmed by the Senate, Comey will replace outgoing director Robert Mueller, who has held the post since 2001.

Comey is best-known for his actions in 2004 when he rushed to the hospital bedside of Attorney General John Ashcroft to keep Bush aides from reauthorizing a warrantless-wiretapping program. Comey has described the incident as the most difficult night of his career.

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1:27pm

Fri June 21, 2013
The Two-Way

Supermoon To Dominate Weekend Sky

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 1:49 pm

A "supermoon" rises in Washington, D.C., on March 19, 2011.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

The largest full moon of the year will grace the night sky Sunday as our nearest neighbor in space makes its closest approach.

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1:24pm

Fri June 21, 2013
The Two-Way

Pirate Bay Co-Founder Gets Two Years For Hacking And Fraud

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 2:22 pm

A co-founder of the file-sharing website Pirate Bay has been sentenced in Sweden to two years in prison for hacking into a bank computer.

Gottfrid Svartholm Warg, 28, was arrested in Cambodia last year after Swedish authorities issued an international warrant. He was convicted and sentenced Thursday for hacking Sweden's Nordea bank and U.K.-based services firm Logica.

"The data intrusion has been very extensive and technically advanced," the court said in its ruling.

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5:12pm

Thu June 20, 2013
The Two-Way

Dow Loses 350 Points After Fed Hints It Will Stop Buying Bonds

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 5:25 pm

Traders work the floor of the New York Stock Exchange after the opening bell on Thursday.
John Moore Getty Images

The Dow Jones industrial average closed down more than 353 points on Thursday in a selloff sparked by uncertainty about the end of a government monetary stimulus program and a credit crunch in China.

Wall Street followed a downturn in global markets. The Standard & Poor's 500-stock index lost 2.5 percent, while the Dow and Nasdaq composite indexes both lost 2.3 percent.

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5:04pm

Thu June 20, 2013
The Two-Way

NSA Reportedly Allowed To Keep Some Domestic Communications

Attorney General Eric Holder reportedly signed off on the FISA court rulings that allowed the NSA to retain domestic communications under some circumstances.
Handout Getty Images

Special U.S. courts charged with authorizing electronic surveillance of suspected foreign terrorists gave permission to the NSA to retain in certain cases "inadvertently acquired" domestic communications, The Guardian reports.

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