Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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9:39am

Sat March 1, 2014
The Two-Way

Pakistani Taliban Promise Cease-Fire To Resume Peace Talks

Shahidullah Shahid (right), spokesman of banned Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan sits with a local commander Azam Tariq as they speak to journalists at an undisclosed location near the Afghan border last month.
Saood Rehman EPA/Landov

The Pakistani Taliban said Saturday it will observe a month-long cease-fire to revive failed peace talks with Islamabad.

"The senior leadership of the Taliban advises all subgroups to respect the Taliban's call for a ceasefire and abide by it and completely refrain from all jihadi activities in this time period," the militant group said in a statement.

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8:53am

Sat March 1, 2014
The Two-Way

Russia's Parliament Approves Putin's Call For Troops In Ukraine

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 6:32 pm

Young people look at pro-Russian armed men blocking access to the Ukrainian frontier guard base in Balaklava, a small city not far from Sevastopol, on Saturday.
Viktor Drachev AFP/Getty Images

This post was updated at 4:50 p.m. ET.

Russia's parliament has unanimously approved a request by President Vladimir Putin to authorize the intervention of Moscow's forces in Ukraine until "the normalization of the political situation" there. In response, Ukraine put its own forces on alert and warned that a Russian invasion would spark war between the two countries.

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5:03pm

Sun February 23, 2014
The Two-Way

American Held In Israel For 1997 Murder Is Killed In Prison Shootout

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 9:50 am

Samuel Sheinbein, 18, arrives at the Tel Aviv District Court in this March 22, 1999 file photo. He was killed in a prison shootout on Sunday after being imprisoned for 17 years.
STAFF Reuters/Landov

Samuel Sheinbein, an American who fled to Israel after murdering a Maryland teenager 17 years ago, was killed in a prison shootout on Sunday during an apparent escape attempt near Tel Aviv.

The Associated Press reports:

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4:15pm

Sun February 23, 2014
The Two-Way

Taliban Break Off Negotiations On U.S. Soldier Held Since 2009

A Taliban-affiliated website shows Bowe R. Bergdahl, a U.S. soldier captured by the Taliban in southeastern Afghanistan in June, 2009, sometime after his capture by Taliban militants.
Reuters/Landov

The Afghan Taliban said it was cutting off talks with Washington to trade long-time captive U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five of the prisoners held at Guantanamo.

The Associated Press says it's received via email "a terse Pashto language statement" from Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid blaming the "current complex political situation in the country" for suspending the discussions.

The AP says a U.S. official confirms that the talks have been suspended.

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2:38pm

Sun February 23, 2014
The Two-Way

Egypt's Morsi Accused Of Aiding Iran's Revolutionary Guards

Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi in a soundproof barred glass cage is seen during a court appearance on Feb. 16.
Mohammed al-Law AP

Ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi has been accused of passing state secrets to Iran's Revolutionary Guard at a hearing at the jailed leader's trial in Cairo.

A prosecutor at the hearing said Morsi, who stands accused of numerous charges, was involved along with 35 others in a plot to destabilize Egypt.

The BBC reports:

"Mr Morsi's supporters say he and other senior Muslim Brotherhood leaders are the victims of politically motivated prosecutions.

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12:39pm

Sun February 23, 2014
The Edge

Flame Goes Out In Sochi, Torch Passes To Pyeongchang

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 1:42 pm

Pyrotechnics explode over dancers formed into the Olympic rings during the closing ceremony of the 2014 Winter Olympics, on Sunday.
David J. Phillip AP

This post was last updated at 1:40 p.m. ET.

The torch has officially been passed. The 22nd Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia, are over with all the drama in the competition and not over safety and security during the 17 days of the events, as many had feared.

Outdoor fireworks rattled Sochi's Fisht Stadium as the Olympic flame was set to be extinguished Sunday. Winners and losers in the international competition now will have to look east to South Korea to test their Olympic mettle in the contest for medals four years from now, in 2018.

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9:48am

Sun February 23, 2014
The Two-Way

Many Wounded, 2 Dead In Bangkok Bomb Blast

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 1:26 pm

Thai soldiers check the site of a bomb explosion in Bangkok, Thailand, on Sunday. At least 22 people, including three children, were wounded in a bomb explosion near an anti-government protest site.
Rachen Sageamsak Xinhua/Landov

An apparent grenade attack on an anti-government protest in Thailand's capital has killed at least two people and wounded nearly two dozen others, as unrest in the country continues amid a push by opposition forces to topple the elected prime minister.

NPR's Michael Sullivan reports:

"The blast occurred near Central World shopping mall in the heart of [Bangkok] and at least three children are among those most seriously injured, according to the government-run Erawan Medical Center.

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7:49am

Sun February 23, 2014
The Two-Way

Last Of The 'Sound Of Music' Von Trapps Dies At 99

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 1:29 pm

Maria von Trapp in 2008 at the age of 93. The daughter of Austrian Baron Georg von Trapp points to her father on an old family picture. She died on Tuesday at her home in Vermont.
Kerstin Joensson AP

Maria von Trapp, the last surviving member of the seven original Trapp Family Singers — the Austrian family that inspired the 1965 film The Sound of Music -- has died at 99 at her home in Vermont.

Von Trapp, whose family escaped Nazi Germany, died on Tuesday of natural causes, her brother Johannes von Trapp said, according to the New York Daily News.

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1:03pm

Sat February 22, 2014
The Two-Way

In Rare Unison, U.N. Demands That Syria Allow Humanitarian Aid

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 4:17 pm

A Syrian refugee boy stands outside his tent at Al Zaatri refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria, earlier this week.
Muhammad Hamed Reuters/Landov

The United Nations Security Council has unanimously called on Syria to immediately allow the delivery of humanitarian aid to millions of needy people in the war-torn country.

Veto-wielding Russia and China, which have been strong supporters of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime in the past, joined other members on the council in passing the resolution.

The move doesn't threaten sanctions, but it does warn of "further steps" if Syria doesn't comply.

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12:17pm

Sat February 22, 2014
The Two-Way

Mexican Drug Cartel Kingpin Captured In Joint U.S.-Mexico Raid

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 6:04 am

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is escorted to a helicopter in handcuffs by Mexican navy marines at a navy hanger in Mexico City on Saturday. A senior U.S. law enforcement official said that Guzman, the head of Mexico's Sinaloa Cartel, was captured alive overnight in the beach resort town of Mazatlan.
Eduardo Verdugo AP

This story was updated at 4:20 p.m. ET.

The head of Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel, Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, was captured overnight by U.S. and Mexican officials in the Pacific coastal town of Mazatlan.

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11:31am

Sat February 22, 2014
The Two-Way

Tale Of Two Popes: Francis, Benedict Appear Together In Public

Newly-elected Cardinal Leopoldo Jose Brenes Solorzano, Archbishop of Managua, right, is hugged by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI during a consistory inside the St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, on Saturday.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

Pope Francis and his predecessor, Benedict XVI, appeared together at a ceremony anointing 19 new cardinals in what The Associated Press described as "an unprecedented blending of papacies past, present and future."

In the solemn event, known as a consistory, Francis on Saturday bestowed red hats on his first batch of cardinals.

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2:21pm

Fri February 21, 2014
The Two-Way

Enterprising Girl Scout Sells Cookies Outside Marijuana Clinic

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 2:38 pm

Thin mints, shortbreads and caramel delights. Danielle Lei, 13, sold 117 boxes outside a medical marijuana clinic in San Francisco.
Ross Hailey MCT/Landov

If there's a merit badge for business savvy, 13-year-old Girl Scout Danielle Lei might well deserve one.

Danielle, who set up her table of Girl Scout cookies outside The Green Cross medical marijuana dispensary in San Francisco earlier this week, sold a whopping 117 boxes in a single day. She appears to have tapped into a niche market fueled by the drug's well-known propensity to stimulate appetite.

According to a Facebook page for The Green Cross, Danielle had "to call for back-up Girl Scout Cookies" after 45 minutes.

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11:52am

Fri February 21, 2014
The Two-Way

U.S. Official: Beijing Preparing For 'Short, Sharp' War With Japan

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 3:21 pm

A ceremony is held to mark a new patrol vessel in service for China's marine surveillance in Zhoushan, east China's Zhejiang Province, last month.
Shen Lei Xinhua/Landov

China is stepping up war games in preparation for a possible conflict with Japan over the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands, a tiny island chain in the East China Sea claimed by both Beijing and Tokyo, a senior U.S. Navy official says.

Captain James Fanell, deputy chief of staff intelligence and information operations for the U.S. Pacific Fleet, made the remark at a conference put on by the U.S. Naval Institute in San Diego last week.

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9:45am

Fri February 21, 2014
The Two-Way

Apple's Steve Jobs To Be Featured On U.S. Postage Stamp

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 10:04 am

Apple founder Steve Jobs, who died in 2011, is slated to be featured on a U.S. postage stamp next year.
Terry Schmitt UPI/Landov

Apple founder Steve Jobs, a man who probably did as much as anyone to set in motion the slow but steady demise of snail mail, will be featured on a U.S. postage stamp, according to a document from the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee.

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8:50am

Fri February 21, 2014
The Two-Way

Judge Tosses Suit Alleging NYPD Illegally Spied On Muslims

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 9:45 am

Sheikh Reda Shata stands in the men's prayer room at his mosque, The Islamic Center of Monmouth County, in Middletown, N.J., in Oct. 2011. From 2002 onward, Muslims in New Jersey allege police routinely monitored their comings and goings as part of a surveillance program.
Mel Evans AP

A federal judge has ruled that New York City Police did not violate the rights of Muslims by putting New Jersey mosques under routine surveillance in an effort to prevent terrorism.

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