All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, and Melissa Block

This program presents a trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features. It rings with the disparate voices of its commentators, from veteran analyst Daniel Schorr and storyteller Kevin Kling to poet Andrei Codrescu. It hums with the distinctive music that threads between reports -- music collected in the online program All Songs Considered. And by the time All Things Considered marked its 30th anniversary on the air, the program had earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the Peabody, DuPont and Overseas Press Club awards.

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4:27pm

Wed April 22, 2015
Politics

California Senate Committee Approves Bill Removing Vaccine Exemptions

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:27pm

Wed April 22, 2015
Law

Closing Arguments Begin In AIG Bailout Case

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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6:33pm

Tue April 21, 2015
The Salt

At Last: Kentucky Authorities Bust Ring Behind Great Bourbon Heist

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 12:56 pm

Pappy Van Winkle bourbons at Bourbons Bistro in Louisville, Ky. The spirit was pricey even before a heist at the distillery.
Noah Adams/for NPR

Finally, the great Kentucky bourbon mystery has been solved.

Back in 2013, more than 200 bottles of aging Pappy Van Winkle bourbon vanished from a locked, secure area of the Buffalo Trace distillery in Frankfort, Ky. Even before the heist, the bottles were rare — some fetched as much as $1,000 in private sales.

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5:47pm

Tue April 21, 2015
Law

Too Often, Some Say, Volunteer Officers Just Want To Play Cop

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 10:58 am

Robert Bates (left), a Tulsa County, Okla., reserve deputy, leaves his arraignment Tuesday with his attorney. Bates fatally shot a suspect who was pinned down by officers, raising alarms about volunteer police officers who wear badges and carry guns.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Bob Ball is a real estate investor in Portland, Ore., but that's just his day job. For the past 20 years, he has also been a volunteer cop.

"When I was new, it was the best time of my life. I got to go out there and wear a white hat and help people and make a difference in my community, one little piece at a time," Ball says. "That's a very, very fulfilling thing to do."

This is real police work. On one occasion, Ball had to pull his gun on a guy threatening a woman with a knife.

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5:47pm

Tue April 21, 2015
NPR Ed

Teaching Students To Hear The Music In The Built World

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 9:31 am

Architecture professor Diana Agrest evaluates her students' work during a class critique at Cooper Union in New York.
LA Johnson NPR

What makes a great teacher great? That's the question at the heart of 50 Great Teachers, from the NPR Ed Team.

Diana Agrest believes architecture is so much more than a marriage of form and function. For more than four decades, she's been trying to get her students to believe that too.

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5:47pm

Tue April 21, 2015
The Salt

Millions Of Chickens To Be Killed As Bird Flu Outbreak Puzzles Industry

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 1:08 pm

Chickens stand in their cages at a farm near Stuart, Iowa, in 2009. This week, bird flu hit a large poultry facility in Iowa. It's not clear how the virus is evading the industry's biosecurity efforts.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Bird flu has been striking chicken and turkey farms in parts of the West and Midwest. This past week, it hit a flock of millions egg-laying chickens in northeastern Iowa. Update 4/22/2015: The USDA now says that around 3 million birds were affected in the Iowa facility — down from a previous estimate of 5 million.

Our original post continues below.

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5:03pm

Tue April 21, 2015
Environment

5 Years After BP Oil Spill, Experts Debate Damage To Ecosystem

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:18 am

Fresh oil puddles on the white sand in Orange Beach, Ala., during the BP oil spill in 2010.
Debbie Elliott NPR

At the Gulf State Park Pier in Orange Beach, Ala., Wetzel Wood casts his fishing line into the rough surf of the Gulf of Mexico. He pulls his bait, a cigar minnow, through the water just beyond where the waves break for the shore.

"On a good day you'd catch king mackerel, Spanish mackerel," he says. Wood first learned to fish at the pier with his grandfather in 1969. "I've seen a lot of different things out here. It's been wonderful."

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4:58pm

Tue April 21, 2015
Remembrances

Pat Dowell, Longtime NPR Film Critic, Dies

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 6:25 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Longtime NPR contributor Pat Dowell died Sunday after a long illness. She was 66. Pat covered film for nearly 30 years. Our critic Bob Mondello remembers his late colleague.

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4:56pm

Tue April 21, 2015
Sports

MLB To Debut 'Statcast' Tracking Technology Tonight

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 6:25 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

6:23pm

Mon April 20, 2015
All Tech Considered

At 50 Years Old, The Challenge To Keep Up With Moore's Law

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 9:40 pm

Intel Corp. co-founder Gordon Moore holds up a silicon wafer at Intel headquarters in Santa Clara, Calif., in 2005. Moore's prediction 50 years ago, called Moore's Law, has been the basis for the digital revolution.
Paul Sakuma AP

Fifty years ago this week, a chemist in what is now Silicon Valley published a paper that set the groundwork for the digital revolution.

You may never have heard of Moore's law, but it has a lot do with why you will pay about the same price for your next computer, smartphone or tablet, even though it will be faster and have better screen resolution than the last one.

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6:23pm

Mon April 20, 2015
Media

Small South Carolina Newspaper Takes Home Top Pulitzer Prize

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 6:01 am

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6:23pm

Mon April 20, 2015
World

Mediterranean Migration Crisis Represents Scope Of Smuggling Business

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:08pm

Mon April 20, 2015
Shots - Health News

Federal Panel Revisits Contested Recommendation On Mammograms

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 5:29 pm

In 2009, I was among the scrum of reporters covering the controversial advice from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that women in their 40s think twice about regular mammograms. The task force pointed out that the net benefits in younger women were small and said women should weigh the pros and cons of screening before making a decision.

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5:06pm

Mon April 20, 2015
Law

Meet The 'Accidental Activists' Of The Supreme Court's Same-Sex-Marriage Case

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 6:23 pm

Jayne Rowse (left) and April DeBoer with their four children, Jacob (from left), Rylee, Nolan and Ryanne at a news conference in March.
Valerie Macon Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court hears legal arguments next week in the legal battle over same-sex marriage. It's an extraordinarily high-stakes clash, but the men and women at the center of it see themselves as incredibly ordinary. The 12 couples and two widowers include doctors, lawyers, an Army sergeant, nurses and teachers.

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4:53pm

Mon April 20, 2015
Music Reviews

'Sound & Color' A Bold Leap Forward For Alabama Shakes

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 6:23 pm

Alabama Shakes' new album, Sound & Color, is powered by more than just the vocals of Brittany Howard.
Brantley Gutierrez Courtesy of the artist

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