All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, and Melissa Block

This program presents a trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features. It rings with the disparate voices of its commentators, from veteran analyst Daniel Schorr and storyteller Kevin Kling to poet Andrei Codrescu. It hums with the distinctive music that threads between reports -- music collected in the online program All Songs Considered. And by the time All Things Considered marked its 30th anniversary on the air, the program had earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the Peabody, DuPont and Overseas Press Club awards.

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3:46pm

Wed July 31, 2013
Religion

Should Military Chaplains Have To Believe In God?

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:48 pm

There has been a recent push for humanist chaplains in the United States military. Around 13,000 active service members are atheist or agnostic. Here, U.S. Army soldiers bow their heads in prayer during Easter sunrise service at Camp Liberty in Iraq, in 2009.
Marko Drobnjakovic AP

The United States military chaplaincy program has a proud heritage that stretches all the way back to the Continental Army during the American Revolution.

"They are rabbis, ministers, imams and priests who serve our nation's heroes and their families as committed members of the U.S. Army," according to one video produced by the U.S. Army Chaplain Corps.

But are they ready for an atheist chaplain?

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6:01pm

Tue July 30, 2013
Music

On The Road To Rock Excess: Why The '60s Really Ended In 1973

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:58 am

British rockers Led Zeppelin pose in front of their private plane, dubbed "The Starship," in 1973.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Author Michael Walker says that by the end of the 1960s, you could fairly say there were two generations of baby boomers: those who had experienced that decade's peace-and-love era of music firsthand, and those who learned about it from their older brothers and sisters.

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5:58pm

Tue July 30, 2013
Parallels

Anti-Gay Riot In Tblisi Tests Balance Between Church, State

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 8:06 pm

Anti-gay protesters try to attack a bus with gay activists who are being taken away from a pro-gay-rights rally by police for their own protection in Tblisi, Georgia, on May 17. Thousands of anti-gay protesters, including Orthodox priests, occupied a central street in Georgia's capital.
Shakh Aivazov AP

While gay rights have been gaining ground in the West, they've been facing a strong backlash in many countries of the former Soviet Union.

Russia recently passed a law that makes it a crime to give information about "non-traditional sexual relationships" to minors.

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5:45pm

Tue July 30, 2013
Shots - Health News

Parents Grapple With Explaining Cancer To Children

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:08 pm

Laura Molina, 9, shows the mask she created expressing the feeling of "sadness." Her mother is being treated for breast cancer at the Lyndon B. Johnson public hospital in Houston.
Carrie Feibel KUHF

Jack Goodman remembers the day his mother, Julie, told the family she had colorectal cancer. He was in seventh grade.

"They just sat us down on the futon in the living room, or the couch that we had, and told us," Jack says. "But I didn't worry because I give it up to God."

His younger sister, Lena, was in fourth grade. She wasn't so easily comforted.

"I was worried. Like she was going to like, maybe die from it, because it's happened to a few people that we know."

Julie Goodman reflects on how hard it was to tell them.

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4:26pm

Tue July 30, 2013
U.S.

Where Do Drugs For Lethal Injections Come From? Few Know

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:45 pm

A new law in Georgia makes information about where the state got its supply of lethal injection drugs a secret.
Ric Feld AP

Several states are dealing with a shortage of lethal injection drugs and have had problems getting enough to carry out executions. In Georgia, lawmakers passed a measure that makes information about where the state got its supply a secret.

The Lethal Injection Secrecy Act says that the identity of people or companies that manufacture, supply or prescribe drugs used in executions is a state secret. But attorneys for death row inmate Warren Lee Hill are challenging the state over whether that law is constitutional.

Cruel And Unusual Punishment?

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4:26pm

Tue July 30, 2013
Africa

Zimbabweans Hope For Fair And Peaceful Presidential Election

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 8:43 pm

A newspaper headline calls for the defeat of Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe on the eve of elections in Zimbabwe on Tuesday in Harare.
AP

Zimbabweans vote for a new president Wednesday, after a violent and disputed election in 2008 and five anxious and turbulent years since.

The much anticipated vote ends a power-sharing deal between veteran leader Robert Mugabe and his main political rival, who is the leading challenger in the presidential race.

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4:26pm

Tue July 30, 2013
Business

White House Proposes Major Changes To Corporate Tax Code

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:32 pm

President Obama traveled to Tennessee on Tuesday, another event in his recent push to emphasize jobs and the economy.

4:04pm

Tue July 30, 2013
All Tech Considered

Scott Simon On Sharing His Mother's Final Moments On Twitter

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:33 pm

Simon's parents on their wedding day.
Courtesy of Scott Simon

If you are among NPR host Scott Simon's 1.3 million Twitter followers, you likely know the news. Simon's mother, Patricia Lyons Simon Newman, entered a Chicago hospital on July 21 and died Monday night. She was 84 years old.

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1:03pm

Tue July 30, 2013
The Record

Maxwell's, The Beloved New Jersey Venue, Closes

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:32 pm

Maxwell's, in Hoboken, N.J., hosted Bruce Springsteen, Nirvana and the Replacements, to name a few.
George Kopp

The rock club Maxwell's is a tiny space that's hosted some of the biggest names in music for more than 30 years. R.E.M., Nirvana and many more bands have squeezed onto Maxwell's stage in Hoboken, N.J. Native son Bruce Springsteen recorded the music video for "Glory Days" there.

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6:29pm

Mon July 29, 2013
Shots - Health News

Panel Urges Lung Cancer Screening For Millions Of Americans

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 2:24 pm

Some images of lung cancer are clear cut. But in many others, a nodule on the screen turns out not to be cancer at all.
iStockphoto.com

A federal task force is planning to recommend that millions of smokers and former smokers get a CT scan annually to look for early signs of lung cancer.

The 16-member US Preventive Services Task Force gives that lung cancer screening test a grade of B, which puts it on the same level as mammography for women between the ages of 50 and 74.

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6:24pm

Mon July 29, 2013
Code Switch

In Nation's First Black Public High School, A Blueprint For Reform

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 2:26 pm

Dunbar High School has a notable list of graduates, including the first black presidential Cabinet member, the first black general in the Army and several of the lawyers who argued the Brown v. Board of Education decision.
Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

The nation's first black public high school, Paul Laurence Dunbar High, opened its doors in Washington, D.C., in 1870. But more than 140 years later, Dunbar — like many urban schools — has fallen on hard times. The crumbling, brutalist-style building is often described as a prison, and graduation rates hover around 60 percent.

But it wasn't always that way. Once upon a time, the yearbook read like a Who's Who of black America.

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5:40pm

Mon July 29, 2013
All Tech Considered

What We're Watching As World's Big Hackers Meet In Las Vegas

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:01 pm

Hackers attend the 2011 Def Con conference in Las Vegas. The 2013 conference as well as the Black Hat hacker conference kicks off this week.
Isaac Brekken AP

5:27pm

Mon July 29, 2013
U.S.

Statue Brings Friction Over WWII Comfort Women To California

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:01 pm

South Korean police stand guard beside a comfort woman statue in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul in May. The Southern California city of Glendale will dedicate an identical statue on Tuesday.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

For decades, Koreans have been pushing to preserve the legacy of women forced to provide sex to Japanese army soldiers during World War II. Glendale, Calif., will dedicate a statue memorializing the victims, known as "comfort women," on Tuesday. But the statue has spurred controversy in this Southern California city, where some area residents say it is a divisive reminder of the horrors of war.

The sculpture is a bronze statue of a young girl. She looks about 14 — around the same age as many comfort women when they were forced into military brothels run by Japan's imperial army.

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5:27pm

Mon July 29, 2013
Law

Legal Battles Over Land Rights, Pipelines Are On The Rise

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:01 pm

The Crosstex NGL Pipeline is just one such project in the country that has forced long, unwanted legal battles between oil companies and landowners.
Mose Buchele KUT

At Margaret O'Keefe's farm in East Texas, they grow high-quality Bermuda grass. The fields are flat and vibrant green, surrounded by woods of a darker, richer green. The family loves this land. O'Keefe inherited it from her mother, who divided it among eight children.

"She used to call it 'enchanted valley,' " O'Keefe says.

But her "enchanted valley" also lies in the path of the Crosstex NGL Pipeline.

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4:50pm

Mon July 29, 2013
Environment

Once Resilient, Trees In The West Now More Vulnerable To Fires

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 2:24 pm

The remains of a tree are seen in front of a boulder in the Dome Wilderness area of New Mexico in August 2012. The Las Conchas Fire torched the land in 2011, burning through more than 150,000 acres of forest.
David Gilkey NPR

On any given day, there's a wildfire burning somewhere in the U.S. — and that's not necessarily a bad thing. Many western forests have evolved with fire, and actually benefit from the occasional wildfire.

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