All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, and Melissa Block

This program presents a trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features. It rings with the disparate voices of its commentators, from veteran analyst Daniel Schorr and storyteller Kevin Kling to poet Andrei Codrescu. It hums with the distinctive music that threads between reports -- music collected in the online program All Songs Considered. And by the time All Things Considered marked its 30th anniversary on the air, the program had earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the Peabody, DuPont and Overseas Press Club awards.

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5:09pm

Sat June 22, 2013
Music Interviews

Jimmy Eat World Finds The Fuel To Keep Going

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 1:20 pm

Jimmy Eat World's new album, Damage, is its eighth in 20 years together. Left to right: Rick Burch, Zach Lind, Jim Adkins and Tom Linton.
Michael Elins Courtesy of the artist

Jimmy Eat World is perhaps best known for its hit "The Middle." The peppy tune, released in November 2001, may have been just what an America recovering from the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, needed. But the band's timeline extends for years in both directions; this year it celebrates two decades together.

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5:09pm

Sat June 22, 2013
Movies I've Seen A Million Times

The Movie Matthew Morrison Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 6:18 pm

Actor Jeff Cohen in a scene from The Goonies.
WARNER BROS/Kobal Collection

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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5:14am

Sat June 22, 2013
Shots - Health News

Political Fight Jeopardizes Medicaid In Mississippi

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 7:11 pm

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, a Republican, opposes Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Medicaid and controversy seem inseparable in many states lately. For the most part, the wrangling is about a new wrinkle in Medicaid — the expansion of the health program for the poor and disabled under Obamacare.

Mississippi, though, is raising the stakes. Democrats and Republicans in the state are in a fight, and the outcome could threaten the very existence of the entire Medicaid program there.

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7:23pm

Fri June 21, 2013
National Security

U.S. Charges NSA Leaker Snowden With Espionage

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

NPR has learned that the U.S. Department of Justice has prepared the documents to formally charge Edward Snowden with espionage. Snowden is the former contractor who has publicized details of two U.S. surveillance programs through the British newspaper The Guardian. NPR's Carrie Johnson joins us now with the latest, and Carrie, everyone's been waiting for this shoe to drop. What do we know about the government's plans to proceed?

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7:11pm

Fri June 21, 2013
Around the Nation

Ghost Island Looms Large Among Displaced Inupiat Eskimos

King Island is only accessible via helicopter or chartered boat.
Rachel D'Oro AP

Out in Alaska's Bering Sea, about 90 miles from Nome, sits a small, rocky island that used to be home to a couple of hundred Inupiat Eskimos. They lived in houses built on stilts, perched on rocky cliffs.

Then, about 50 years ago, the threat of rock slides, the spread of tuberculosis and the loss of men to World War II forced residents to relocate to the mainland. King Island has been a ghost island ever since.

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5:20pm

Fri June 21, 2013
Around the Nation

At Coney Island, The (Mermaid) Show Must Go On

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 7:11 pm

The Mermaid Parade at Coney Island draws hundreds of thousands of revelers each June. After sustaining significant damage during Superstorm Sandy, the nonprofit that runs the parade was almost unable to host this year's event, scheduled for Saturday.
Eric Thayer Reuters/Landov

Not even Superstorm Sandy could keep the mermaids from coming back to Brooklyn.

The Mermaid Parade is a nautically themed and occasionally naughty parade that draws close to a million people to Coney Island, in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, each June. Sandy nearly drowned the organization that hosts the parade, but supporters donated more than $100,000 to get the parade back on its fins this year.

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4:53pm

Fri June 21, 2013
Media

Is It Ethical? Universities Pay Newspaper For Coverage

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 7:11 pm

Copies of The Orange County Register slide through the presses. The Register is the country's 20th most-read daily, with a circulation of about 285,000.
Grant Slater KPCC

This spring, readers of The Orange County Register in Southern California started seeing much more coverage of local universities. What they probably did not know is that the stories are paid for by the schools. Depending on whom you ask, it is either a smart way to bring in revenue, or a serious breach of journalism ethics.

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4:53pm

Fri June 21, 2013
Monkey See

The Kendama: Can A Wooden Toy Be A Viral Sensation?

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 7:11 pm

The traditional Kendama is making a splash with kids.
Norasit Kaewsai iStockphoto.com

7:04pm

Thu June 20, 2013
The Salt

How Circadian Rhythms Give Vegetables A Healthy Boost

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 4:56 pm

Researchers at Rice University conducted lab studies using light-dark cycles to try to coax more beneficial compounds out of fruits and vegetables.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Just as we have internal clocks that help regulate the systems in our bodies, fruit and vegetable plants have circadian rhythms, too.

And a new study published in Current Biology finds there may be a way to boost some of the beneficial compounds in plants by simulating the light-dark cycle after crops are harvested.

So, how does it work?

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6:42pm

Thu June 20, 2013
History

The Desegregation Of Birmingham's Golf Courses

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 6:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. All this week, I'm in Birmingham, Alabama, where the city is in the midst of commemorating the 50th anniversary of the tumultuous and influential civil rights protests that occurred here. One place that might not come to mind when you think about this period is the golf course.

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5:14pm

Thu June 20, 2013
Book Reviews

'Crazy Rich Asians': Lives Of The .0001 Percent

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 6:42 pm

The Venetian Macao, the world's biggest casino by gaming tables, opened to the public in 2007.
Mike Clarke AFP/Getty Images

It's impossible to open the newspaper or turn on the TV these days without seeing some outrageous example of new Asian money. From a castle modeled on Versailles in Changsha to billion-dollar penthouses in Bombay to the Marina Bay Sands casino in Singapore, with its seven celebrity-chef restaurants, the inescapable truth looms before us: We Asians are not just rich but also, frankly, somewhat crazy.

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4:49pm

Thu June 20, 2013
Around the Nation

Rogue Jumpers Parachute From Top Of Chicago's Trump Tower

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 11:19 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Finally, a big jump and a mystery in Chicago. Police are searching for three men who jumped off the top of the 92-story Trump Tower late last night with parachutes. They managed to land and escape before police arrived.

NPR's David Schaper has been gathering reaction in Chicago.

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4:48pm

Thu June 20, 2013
Television

'Dome' Luck: On CBS, A Drama About Getting Stuck With Each Other

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 4:55 pm

In the wake of the dome's mysterious appearance, the townspeople are cut off from access to TV, phones and the Internet, and must make do with the people and objects they have at their disposal.
CBS

One of the most anticipated shows of the summer, Under the Dome, starts Monday on CBS. It's about a tiny New England town that's suddenly and mysteriously sealed off by an impenetrable dome.

The series is the first on-screen collaboration between two of the biggest Steves in popular culture — Steven Spielberg and Stephen King.

"The Steven Squared, we call it," cracks Neal Baer, an executive producer of the show.

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12:13pm

Thu June 20, 2013
National Security

At A Texas Base, Battling Army's Top Threat: Suicide

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 6:42 pm

Soldiers approach armored vehicles after a training exercise at Fort Bliss, Texas, in January.
Juan Carlos Llorca AP

Suicide killed more American troops last year than combat in Afghanistan, and that is likely to be the case again this year.

According to the Pentagon, there were at least 349 confirmed suicides in 2012, compared with 310 U.S. combat deaths in Afghanistan in the same period.

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9:03am

Thu June 20, 2013
Shots - Health News

WHO Finds Violence Against Women Is 'Shockingly' Common

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 9:15 am

Young women listen to a talk on domestic violence and HIV prevention near Lome, Togo, in April. Abused women in sub-Saharan Africa and India are at higher risk for HIV than women who haven't experienced violence.
Darrin Zammit Lupi Reuters/Landov

Thirty-five percent of women around the world have been raped or physically abused, according to statistics the World Health Organization released Thursday. About 80 percent of the time this violence occurs in the home, at the hands of a partner or spouse.

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