All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, and Melissa Block

This program presents a trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features. It rings with the disparate voices of its commentators, from veteran analyst Daniel Schorr and storyteller Kevin Kling to poet Andrei Codrescu. It hums with the distinctive music that threads between reports -- music collected in the online program All Songs Considered. And by the time All Things Considered marked its 30th anniversary on the air, the program had earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the Peabody, DuPont and Overseas Press Club awards.

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5:15pm

Tue May 28, 2013
Monkey See

Comikaze: Not Just The Other Comic Convention

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:43 am

Last year's Comikaze, seen here in September 2012, attracted tens of thousands of attendees.
AP

You may be familiar with the San Diego Comic-Con, a constantly expanding convention for fans that started as a niche event for comic-book nerds and is now a sprawling pop-culture event.

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5:15pm

Tue May 28, 2013
Business

Cruise Industry Adopts Passenger 'Rights' As Incidents Mount

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:43 am

Damage on the Royal Caribbean ship Grandeur of the Seas is visible as the ship docks in Freeport, the Bahamas, on Monday.
Reuters/Landov

About 2,200 passengers were being flown back to Baltimore on Tuesday, a day after their cruise ship caught fire on its way to the Bahamas. There were no injuries aboard Royal Caribbean's Grandeur of the Seas.

But in the wake of the incident and others like it, the cruise ship companies have something of a black eye. The industry is now trying to reassure passengers it's OK for them to sail, adopting what it called a passenger "bill of rights."

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4:46pm

Tue May 28, 2013
Around the Nation

Forgotten For Decades, WWII Alaskans Finally Get Their Due

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:43 am

Frankie Kuzuguk, 82, gets a hug from his daughter Marilyn Kuzuguk at Quyanna Care Center in Nome, Alaska, after receiving an official honorable discharge and a distinguished service coin from visiting Veterans Affairs officials. The VA is still tracking down the few surviving members of the World War II Alaska Territorial Guard or delivering benefits to their next of kin.
David Gilkey NPR

Alaskan Clyde Iyatunguk grew up hearing stories about the U.S. Army colonel, Marvin 'Muktuk' Marston, who helped his father trade his spear for a rifle, to protect his homeland during World War II.

Marston is a household name with Native Alaskans. The nickname comes from an Eskimo eating contest — muktuk is whale skin and blubber, eaten raw.

After the Japanese reached the Aleutian Islands in 1942, Marston traveled by dogsled across Alaska looking for volunteers who knew how to fight and survive in the Arctic terrain.

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4:45pm

Tue May 28, 2013
NPR Story

After Long Wait For Combat, Tad Nagaki Became POW Liberator

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:43 am

After serving in World War II, Tad Nagaki returned to Nebraska to farm corn, beans and sugar beets.
Courtesy of Mary Previte

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who have died this year.

"Tad Nagaki was a gentle, quiet farmer," says Mary Previte, a retired New Jersey legislator and former captive of the Japanese during World War II. That quiet farmer, who did extraordinary things, died in April at the age of 93 at his grandson's Colorado home.

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4:00pm

Tue May 28, 2013
Music News

Coming Home: The Woody Guthrie Center Opens In Tulsa

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:43 am

Outside the Woody Guthrie Center, there's a large mural of Guthrie holding his guitar bearing the phrase, "This Machine Kills Fascists."
Brett Deering WireImage

Woody Guthrie's relationship with his home state has always been complicated. The singer-songwriter left Oklahoma and traveled the nation, composing some of the best-known songs of his time and ours. But to many in the state, his progressive political views did not fit with a strong conservative streak during the Cold War period. His reputation there is now closer to a full restoration as Oklahoma opens his archives.

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3:34pm

Tue May 28, 2013
Pop Culture

What Happens To Spelling Bee Kids? Years Later, The Prize Is Perspective

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 2:25 pm

Srinivas Ayyagari onstage in 1992 (left); at right, Ayyagari today. "Seeing someone from ESPN commenting on your style and strategy was bizarre and weird. But it's the closest I'll ever come to being an athlete," Ayyagari says.
Srinivas Ayyagari

For an academic contest pitting young spellers against the dictionary, the Scripps National Spelling Bee has taken on the intensity of the fiercest athletic events. Feeling the warmth of television lights — not to mention nerves and distractions — all while sports commentators are analyzing your "style" and approach is something only a select club of young word-nerdy Americans gets to experience. How does that early experience affect these mostly middle-school-aged kids later in life?

Lasting Memories

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2:03pm

Tue May 28, 2013
Music Reviews

Darius Rucker: Busted Hearts And Pickup Trucks

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:43 am

Darius Rucker's new album is titled True Believers.
Courtesy of the artist

4:57pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Technology

Vintage Sounds: The Clacks And Dings Of Pinball Machines

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We've asked you to send us stories about the vintage sounds of technology you miss, and we've been listening to those stories on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. Today, Scott Smith of Duncan, South Carolina, with the help of his own vintage sound collection, tells us about something he recalls first hearing when he was a small child.

SCOTT SMITH: I can remember I fell in love with the startup sound of an electromechanical pinball machine, oh, when I was 3 or 4 years old.

(SOUNDBITE OF A PINBALL MACHINE)

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4:28pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Food

Gathering Around The 'Global Grill'

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:36 pm

Bon Appetit editor Adam Rapoport compiled recipes from all over the world for The Grilling Book. Pictured here are Chicken Yakitori.
Courtesy of Peden + Munk

Grilling is a pillar of the American summer and the world's oldest form of cooking. From Latin America to Africa, grilling is at the heart of many cultures. This summer All Things Considered is setting out to explore some of them with the "Global Grill" series.

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4:12pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Parallels

At 500, Machiavelli's 'Prince' Still Inspires Love And Fear

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 5:52 pm

A portrait of Italian philosopher, writer and politician Niccolo Machiavelli (Florence, 1469-1527) by Antonio Maria Crespi. Half a millennium after he wrote The Prince, the slim volume continues to play an important role in political thought and evoke strong response.
Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana De Agostini/Getty Images

The name Niccolo Machiavelli is synonymous with political deceit, cynicism and the ruthless use of power. The Italian Renaissance writer called his most famous work, The Prince, a handbook for statesmen.

An exhibit underway in Rome celebrates the 500th anniversary of what is still considered one of the most influential political essays in Western literature.

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3:12pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Found Recipes

What's Your Favorite Taste Of Summer?

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 6:01 pm

For NPR producer Melissa Gray, nothing says summer more than a cold glass of limeade.
booleansplit/via Flickr

If your motivation plummets during summer's hot and sweaty days, a sweltering kitchen may be the last place on earth you want to be.

But despite the season, we still need to eat and drink. A good story and recipe can go a long way to raising your spirits and divert attention from how miserable you are.

All Things Considered wants to know which recipes give you that boost in the summer.

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2:13pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Parallels

'We Are Not Valued': Brazil's Domestic Workers Seek Rights

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:57 pm

Cassia Mendes, who has worked as a housekeeper for more than 20 years, cleans a house in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Feb. 19, 2012. Brazil enacted on April 2 a constitutional amendment to grant domestic workers health insurance and other benefits.
AFP/Getty Images

The phone is ringing off the hook at the crowded waiting room at the Domestic Workers Union in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil.

In the past decade, millions of Brazilians have joined the middle class. Advocates say this isn't just the result of a growing economy or social spending, but also laws like the one just passed that enshrine domestic workers' rights.

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2:10pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Parallels

Let Them Eat Grass: Paris Employs Sheep As Eco-Mowers

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 6:02 pm

Sheep used to replace gas-guzzling lawn mowers graze at a truck warehouse at Evry, south of Paris.
Francois Mori AP

City officials in Paris are experimenting with an unconventional way to keep urban lawns trimmed.

Agnes Masson used to be simply the director of the Paris city archives. Now, she's also a shepherdess of sorts, responsible for four black sheep munching the lush grass surrounding the gray archives building at the eastern edge of the city.

Masson says the ewes are efficient and easy to care for.

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2:00pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Remembrances

Jake McNiece, WWII Hero And Self-Described 'Troublemaker'

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 7:14 pm

On June 5, 1944, Jake McNiece (right) led a group of paratroopers in World War II. After he shaved his head and painted his face before dropping behind German lines for D-Day, the look caught on with his men.
U.S. Military

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who have died this year.

The Dirty Dozen was a Hollywood hit, but it was based — loosely — on a true-to-life WWII paratrooper regiment. Jake McNiece led the group, whose exploits inspired the 1967 movie and earned the nickname "The Filthy Thirteen." McNiece died in January at the age of 93.

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1:55pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Afghanistan

Service Members Observe Memorial Day Through Sweat And Tears

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:57 pm

U.S. Army Sgt. Michael Johnson trains at Bagram Air Field for the Memorial Day Murphy, a CrossFit workout honoring a Navy SEAL killed in Afghanistan in 2005.
David Gilkey NPR

At Bagram Air Force Base in Afghanistan, Staff Sgt. Michael Johnson exercises under a long, steel framework set on a wooden platform. It looks like a giant jungle gym. Above his head are pull-up bars and rings. A climbing rope is off to one side.

It's here where he and dozens of other soldiers and sailors will remember the fallen, just after sunrise, on Memorial Day. They'll all take part in a grueling exercise regimen, part of CrossFit, the popular high-intensity workout program.

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