All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, and Melissa Block

This program presents a trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features. It rings with the disparate voices of its commentators, from veteran analyst Daniel Schorr and storyteller Kevin Kling to poet Andrei Codrescu. It hums with the distinctive music that threads between reports -- music collected in the online program All Songs Considered. And by the time All Things Considered marked its 30th anniversary on the air, the program had earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the Peabody, DuPont and Overseas Press Club awards.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f826e1c8daeab91b026d|5187f820e1c8daeab91b0269

Pages

3:38pm

Sun April 7, 2013
Sports

A PR Person's How-To Guide For Spinning College Sports

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 5:42 pm

The leg injury to Louisville guard Kevin Ware has been a rallying point for fans nationwide. But the University of Louisville is hoping to avoid looking like they're taking advantage.
Kevin C. Cox Getty Images

The Final Four games at the NCAA men's college basketball tournament on Saturday were just the latest in a week that's been eventful — and unpredictable.

Bettina Cornwell, a marketing expert at the University of Oregon, says universities and colleges like to be ready with their public relations strategies. But sometimes you just can't plan for sports.

How To Be Cinderella

Read more

3:38pm

Sun April 7, 2013
Television

Pirates Steal 'Game Of Thrones': Why HBO Doesn't Mind

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 5:42 pm

Richard Madden plays Robb Stark in HBO's Game of Thrones.
Helen Sloan HBO

More than 1 million fans illegally downloaded the first episode of Game of Thrones Season 3 this week, within 24 hours of its premiere.

That set a record, according to TorrentFreak, a blog that reports the latest trends on file-sharing. The blog also named the popular HBO series the most illegally downloaded television show of 2012.

Read more

3:38pm

Sun April 7, 2013
Movie Interviews

'Ginger And Rosa': A Study Of Women's Relationships

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 5:42 pm

Best friends Rosa (Alice Englert, left) and Ginger (Elle Fanning) are nearly torn apart by the political and social changes of the 1960s.
A24

British filmmaker Sally Potter gained worldwide attention with her 1992 film Orlando. Like all of her movies, it was unconventional in its story and structure. Her new film, Ginger & Rosa, is more realistic and direct.

It's also got a high-profile cast that includes Annette Bening, Oliver Platt, Christina Hendricks and young Elle Fanning. They all play Britons during the fateful Cold War year of 1962, when the Cuban missile crisis had the world thinking the unthinkable: That a nuclear war was about to begin between the Soviet Union and the United States.

Read more

8:37pm

Sat April 6, 2013
Deceptive Cadence

Vespers, Habaneras And Early Morning Walks: New Classical Albums

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 6:52 pm

The Attacca String Quartet's latest album celebrates John Adams.
Lisa-Marie Mazzucco

Robert Frost's famous poem "The Road Not Taken" begins with the line: "Two roads diverged in a yellow wood." Frost's traveler must choose between them. But slide that metaphor over to the world of classical music and you will discover hundreds of paths to explore.

Read more

4:53pm

Sat April 6, 2013
NPR Story

Spring Blooms, And So Do The Creepy Crawlies

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. Spring is here. And just as temperatures begin to creep up, so do the bugs - all matter of creepy crawlies. Among the noisiest and, for my money, most repulsive...

(SOUNDBITE OF CICADAS)

LYDEN: ...cicadas.

MICHAEL RAUPP: My name is Michael J. Raupp. I'm professor of entomology and the bug guy here at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Read more

4:53pm

Sat April 6, 2013
NPR Story

The Extraordinary Lives Of Ordinary North Koreans

Originally published on Sat April 6, 2013 4:55 pm

Amid a cascade of headline news from North Korea, often forgotten are the 24 million average citizens living under the most authoritarian regime in the world. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with Barbara Demick of the Los Angeles Times on the lives of ordinary North Koreans.

4:51pm

Sat April 6, 2013
Education

Loan Education Becomes Prerequisite As Student Debt Balloons

Originally published on Sat April 6, 2013 4:55 pm

College loan debt isn't easing up, and students are struggling to navigate a plethora of obligations.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

For students now sprinting toward the end of their college days, the finish line may not be much of a relief. More than ever, their gait is slowed by the weight of impending debt.

Thirty-seven million Americans share about $1 trillion in student loans, according to Federal Reserve data. It's the biggest consumer debt besides mortgages, eclipsing both auto loans and credit cards. And on it grows, an appetite undiminished by the recession.

Read more

6:01pm

Fri April 5, 2013
Shots - Health News

Human Cases Of Bird Flu In China Draw Scrutiny

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 6:09 pm

A cockerel walks on a bridge in a residential area of Beijing. The Chinese are beginning to destroy thousands of birds in an effort to stamp out the presumed source of H7N9 infection.
Wang Zhao AFP/Getty Images

Sixteen cases of a new flu around Shanghai have touched off a major effort to determine what kind of threat this new bug might be.

The victims range in age from 4 to 87 years old. Six have died. It is a tragedy for them and their families, but is it a global crisis?

To understand why so few cases are generating so much concern, the first thing to know is that no flu virus like this one — called H7N9 — has ever been known to infect humans before.

Read more

4:05pm

Fri April 5, 2013
U.S.

FBI Building May Soon Be 'Put Out Of Its Misery'

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:04 pm

The Federal Bureau of Investigation headquarters in Washington, just blocks from the White House, has long been the government building everyone loves to hate.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

The nation's capital has been undergoing something of a building boom. Dozens of construction cranes dot the Washington, D.C., skyline.

So it comes as no surprise that the federal government is hoping to take advantage of the real estate values and unload what's seen by many as an eyesore on Pennsylvania Avenue: the J. Edgar Hoover Building, headquarters of the FBI.

Read more

3:58pm

Fri April 5, 2013
Economy

Construction Jobs Take A Hit In March After A Fall Boost

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more

3:58pm

Fri April 5, 2013
Book Reviews

Book Review: 'Submergence'

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The writer J.M. Ledgard leads multiple lives. He's a journalist and covers East Africa for the Economist, but Ledgard is also a novelist. Here's Alan Cheuse with a review of his latest book, "Submergence."

ALAN CHEUSE, BYLINE: James More, a British secret agent, has been captured by a Somalian affiliate of al-Qaeda, a peripatetic fringe group that keeps moving him back and forth across the mostly barren terrain of northeastern Africa, trying to hide from drone attacks and make jihad at the same time.

Read more

2:43pm

Fri April 5, 2013
Economy

Honda's Growth Helps Tow Ohio Out Of Recession

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:04 pm

Al Kinzer, who was Honda of America's first employee, drives the company's one millionth U.S.-produced car off the assembly line at Honda's assembly plant in Marysville, Ohio, April 8, 1988.
Greg Sailor AP

Honda is moving its North American headquarters from California to Ohio. That's just the latest bit of good news for the Buckeye State and Honda, whose fortunes have been closely tied for decades now.

Honda has been an economic heavyweight here since it was lured to central Ohio in the 1970s. The company's footprint is big, and it continues to increase.

Honda's sprawling Marysville Auto Plant opened outside Columbus in 1982. Since then, it has grown to nearly 4 million square feet and now sits on a campus of 8,000 acres.

Read more

2:30pm

Fri April 5, 2013
Music Interviews

Bonobo: Challenging Music's 'Borders,' Finding A New Frontier

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:04 pm

Bonobo's new album is titled The North Borders.
Andrew De Francesco Courtesy of the artist

6:27pm

Thu April 4, 2013
The Salt

NYC's Fast-Food Workers Strike, Demand 'Living Wages'

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 8:20 pm

Demonstrators from the Fast Food Forward rally protest Thursday outside a Wendy's restaurant in New York City.
Mary Altaffer AP

Fast-food restaurants were a little bit slower Thursday in New York City. Hundreds of workers staged a one-day strike in what organizers are calling the biggest job action ever in that industry. It's a growing segment of the economy, but workers complain that fast-food jobs don't pay enough to survive in New York City.

Read more

6:00pm

Thu April 4, 2013
Research News

Some Deep-Sea Microbes Are Hungry For Rocket Fuel

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 9:36 am

This bacterium-like microbe, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, seen here in a false-color image, can live in the high temperatures found near deep-sea vents. They can also survive by consuming perchlorate, a chemical used in rocket fuel.
Alfred Pasieka Science Source

It's life, but not as we know it. Researchers in the Netherlands have found that a microbe from deep beneath the ocean can breathe a major ingredient in rocket fuel. The discovery suggests that early life may have used many different kinds of chemicals besides oxygen to survive and thrive.

Read more

Pages