All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, and Melissa Block

This program presents a trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features. It rings with the disparate voices of its commentators, from veteran analyst Daniel Schorr and storyteller Kevin Kling to poet Andrei Codrescu. It hums with the distinctive music that threads between reports -- music collected in the online program All Songs Considered. And by the time All Things Considered marked its 30th anniversary on the air, the program had earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the Peabody, DuPont and Overseas Press Club awards.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f826e1c8daeab91b026d|5187f820e1c8daeab91b0269

Pages

4:55pm

Thu March 14, 2013
Middle East

Courts Become A Battleground For Secularists, Islamists In Syria

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:49 pm

An Islamist rebel group in Aleppo called "the Authority for the Promotion of Virtue and Supporting the Oppressed" reviews applications for aid on Feb. 25. In addition to handing out aid, the Islamist group says it is carrying out civilian administration in parts of Aleppo.
Hamid Khatib Reuters/Landov

In rebel-held parts of Syria, a clash of ideologies is playing out. Powerful Islamist brigades are competing with pro-democracy civilians to shape Syria's future.

One battlefront is in the courts. In many areas in northern Syria, Islamists have set up religious courts that deliver rulings under Shariah, or Islamic law — a fundamental change in Syria's civil legal system.

This is evident on a recent day in a courtroom in the northern Syrian city of Azaz.

Read more

4:28pm

Thu March 14, 2013
The Fast World Of Fast Fashion

Showing Off Shopping Sprees, Fashion 'Haulers' Cash In Online

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:49 pm

Abigail Moscaritolo holds up a recent fashion find on a "haul video." The YouTube trend has become so popular that fashion retailers are approaching haulers to promote their products online.
AbbyLynn401/YouTube

4:18pm

Thu March 14, 2013
Food

Molly Malone: A Soup And Song For St. Patrick's Day

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 6:48 pm

Rachel Allen's recipe for Molly Malone's Cockle and Mussel Chowder derives its name from a popular Irish folk song.
David Loftus

There's always the temptation of heading to an Irish pub, grabbing a pint of Guinness and chowing down on some cabbage and potatoes when March 17 rolls around.

However, there's much more to Irish cuisine than that, says Rachel Allen, a well-known TV chef in Ireland who is appreciated for her simple, doable recipes that champion the country's fresh produce, meats and seafood.

Read more

3:21pm

Thu March 14, 2013
The Two-Way

After Weeks Of Wrangling, An Israeli Government Takes Shape

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:55 am

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu arrives for a meeting in Israel's parliament, the Knesset, on Thursday. Netanyahu has reached agreement with other factions to form a coalition government following an election in January.
Gali Tibbon AFP/Getty Images

Israel appears to have a new government, nearly two months after parliamentary elections.

Since the voting in January, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been trying to put together the pieces of a puzzle that just would not fit.

If he included traditional allies, such as the religious parties, he would close out a chance of forming a government with a popular political newcomer, Yair Lapid.

Read more

1:27pm

Thu March 14, 2013
The Salt

Shanghai's Dead Pigs: Search For Answers Turns Up Denials

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 10:08 pm

Villagers gather dead pigs in Jiaxing, in eastern China's Zhejiang province, on Wednesday. The number of dead pigs found in Shanghai's main river had doubled in two days to more than 6,000, the government said.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

More than a week has passed since thousands of dead pigs were first discovered floating in a river in Shanghai, but authorities have yet to explain fully where the pigs came from or why they died.

Fourteen of the pigs had tags in their ears identifying them as coming from Jiaxing city, in neighboring Zhejiang province. Getting to the bottom of the pig story, though, is tough. A visit to Zhulin village, where most everyone raises pigs, was greeted by serial denials.

Read more

9:04am

Thu March 14, 2013
Law

High-Profile Rape Trial Of High School Football Players Begins In Ohio

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Testimony began today in a rape trail that has thrown a small Ohio town into the international spotlight. Two football players from Steubenville High School are accused of raping a 16-year-old girl during a night of partying last summer. Lawyers for the boys say the sex was consensual. The case has attracted widespread attention in part because of shocking photos, video and texts that circulated over the Internet.

Read more

6:42pm

Wed March 13, 2013
All Tech Considered

'Serendipitous Interaction' Key To Tech Firms' Workplace Design

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 6:44 pm

Google employees play chess at the company's Russian headquarters in Moscow. Experts say tech companies are using "serendipitous interaction" in their workplace design to promote idea sharing and communication between employees.
Krasilnikov Stanislav ITAR-TASS /Landov

When Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer decided to end full-time work-from-home arrangements at her company, a cultural firestorm ignited. But it was just the latest step in Mayer's effort to transform Yahoo's culture.

When the company was founded in the 1990s, it was one of the most exciting places to work in Silicon Valley. Those days are over; Yahoo has fallen woefully behind in the talent wars and now is trying to catch up.

Read more

6:19pm

Wed March 13, 2013
The Papal Succession

American Catholics Look To New Pope For Hope, Renewal

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 6:44 pm

Catholics in Philadelphia react on Wednesday to selection of the new pope.

5:35pm

Wed March 13, 2013
Shots - Health News

Postpartum Depression Affects 1 In 7 Mothers

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 2:09 pm

A JAMA Psychiatry study found that 1 in 7 mothers are affected by postpartum depression.
iStockphoto.com

It's well documented that some women suffer depression after having a baby. But it's less well-known just how many do.

The largest study to date shows that as many as 1 in every 7 women suffers postpartum depression. And the study, published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, finds that among women followed for a year after delivery, some 22 percent had been depressed.

The study also recommends that all pregnant women and new mothers be screened for depression.

Read more

5:00pm

Wed March 13, 2013
Around the Nation

Health Problems Compound For Aging Homeless

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 8:27 pm

Tony Lithgow, 49, and Andrea Mayer, 51, live together on the streets of Baltimore. Researchers say the aging homeless population is due to younger baby boomers who came of age during the 1970s and '80s, when there were back-to-back recessions.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Tony Lithgow and Andrea Mayer have been living under a highway overpass in downtown Baltimore since last year. He's 49 and has been homeless on and off for eight years. She's 51 and has been homeless for 10 years.

Living on the streets has clearly taken a toll on the couple, both physically and mentally. While they're standing at a corner waiting for a free city bus to take them to a soup kitchen, Tony shouts at a passenger staring at them from a car stopped at the light.

"We're homeless!" he calls out to the man.

Read more

4:50pm

Wed March 13, 2013
All Songs Considered

Baby Bands, Pop Stars And Room-Filling Joy: What To Expect At SXSW 2013

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 9:55 am

Twin Horns Of Joy? Members of the band The Bottom Dollars play on the street in Austin, Texas, during the opening night of the South by Southwest music festival.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Listen to Stephen Thompson's conversation with Audie Cornish on All Things Considered by clicking the audio link.


The South by Southwest music festival kicked off Tuesday with the first of five straight nights of music overload: The clubs, makeshift music venues and front porches of Austin, Texas, were overrun with little-known discoveries-in-waiting and big names alike, as well as tens of thousands of fans who have flocked to the city in search of epiphanies.

Read more

1:59pm

Wed March 13, 2013
Europe

German Prince Plans To Put Bison Back In The Wild

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 5:17 pm

European bison, or wisents, keep a safe distance from human visitors to their enclosure on the property of Prince Richard of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg in Germany's densely populated state of North Rhine-Westphalia.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

A small herd of European bison will soon be released in Germany's most densely populated state, the first time in nearly three centuries that these bison — known as wisents — will roam freely in Western Europe.

The project is the brainchild of Prince Richard of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg. He owns more than 30,000 acres, much of it covered in Norwegian spruce and beech trees in North Rhine-Westphalia.

For the 78-year-old logging magnate, the planned April release of the bull, five cows and two calves will fulfill a decade-old dream.

Read more

10:23am

Wed March 13, 2013
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Fan Accompanies Billy Joel; 'Greatest Moment Of My Life,' He Says

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 4:52 pm

Michael Pollack, right, getting a handshake and blessing from Billy Joel. Pollack asked Joel if he could come on state to accompany the pop star on "New York State of Mind." Joel said yes and the video has gone viral.
YouTube.com

It's taken about a month to hit the mainstream media's websites.

Read more

6:24pm

Tue March 12, 2013
The Salt

Can Dunkin' Donuts Really Turn Its Palm Oil Green?

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 7:13 pm

Dunkin' Donuts plans to go green by committing to purchasing all of its palm oil from sustainable sources.
Andrew Huff/via Flickr

Dunkin' Donuts is changing its recipes — though you may not notice much difference the next time you bite into a cruller. In response to pressure from one of New York's top elected officials, the company recently announced that it will set a goal of using only 100 percent sustainable palm oil in making its donuts.

Read more

5:47pm

Tue March 12, 2013
It's All Politics

'Unprecedented': Budget Cuts Could Hit Some Airport Towers

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:45 pm

A statue of golf legend Arnold Palmer stands outside Arnold Palmer Regional Airport in Latrobe, Pa.
Brian Naylor NPR

Control towers at many small and medium-sized airports around the country are set to shut down next month because of the across-the-board federal budget cuts. The towers have been operated under contract to the Federal Aviation Administration.

One of the airports affected is in Latrobe, Pa., southeast of Pittsburgh — the Arnold Palmer Regional Airport, named after the golf great who grew up a well-placed drive from the runway. A statue of Palmer watches over the small terminal.

Read more

Pages