All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, and Melissa Block

This program presents a trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features. It rings with the disparate voices of its commentators, from veteran analyst Daniel Schorr and storyteller Kevin Kling to poet Andrei Codrescu. It hums with the distinctive music that threads between reports -- music collected in the online program All Songs Considered. And by the time All Things Considered marked its 30th anniversary on the air, the program had earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the Peabody, DuPont and Overseas Press Club awards.

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5:33pm

Thu March 8, 2012
U.S.

House Committee Urges Action On Food Stamp Fraud

Originally published on Thu March 8, 2012 6:11 pm

One USDA official credits the use of plastic benefit cards with helping to reduce federal food stamp fraud. But lawmakers say that isn't enough.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

With more than 46 million recipients, the food stamp program has become one of the government's biggest benefit programs.

It has also become one of the biggest targets for those who think the federal government isn't doing enough to prevent fraud.

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4:42pm

Thu March 8, 2012
Winter Songs

Winter Songs: A Family In Limbo Looks To Brandi Carlile

Originally published on Thu March 8, 2012 6:11 pm

Brandi Carlile's song "Dying Day" took on new meaning for a Wisconsin woman hoping to adopt a child from Ethiopia.
Courtesy of the artist

This year's Winter Song playlist concludes with music that carried one woman though a difficult season that would change her life.

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5:23pm

Wed March 7, 2012
Movies

In 'Mosquita Y Mari,' A Tale Of Self And Community

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 2:32 pm

(From left) Pineda, writer-director Aurora Guerrero and Troncoso pose for a portrait during the 2012 Sundance Film Festival.
Larry Busacca Getty Images

The film Mosquita y Mari — the first narrative feature by a Chicana director to screen at the Sundance Film Festival — is both the singular vision of writer-director Aurora Guerrero and a crowdsourced production that could not have been made without multiple communities coming together.

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3:00pm

Wed March 7, 2012
From Our Listeners

Letters: On Belarus And 'Chitty Chitty Bang Bang'

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block correct the record by reading emails from listeners who heard mistakes in Tuesday's program; one, about the geo-political state of Belarus, and the other about the movie Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.

3:59pm

Tue March 6, 2012
Monkey See

Spurred By Success, Publishers Look For The Next 'Hunger Games'

Originally published on Tue March 6, 2012 7:19 pm

The film version of the young adult book sensation The Hunger Games opens March 23rd. The hype around the movie has sent the sales of the already best-selling trilogy to new heights. And publishers are eagerly churning out more books set in post apocalyptic dystopian worlds — just like The Hunger Games.

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3:00pm

Tue March 6, 2012
NPR Story

Deadly Hospital Infection On The Rise

While most infections acquired by patients in the hospital or nursing home are going down, one deadly infection is not. It's called "C. difficile" and it claims more than 14,000 lives each year.

2:00pm

Tue March 6, 2012
The Record

Disney Songwriter Robert Sherman Has Died

Originally published on Wed March 7, 2012 2:33 pm

Composer/lyricist Robert Sherman (left) and his brother Richard stand next to the car used in the 1968 film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. The brothers wrote the songs for the movie, as well as a musical version that began running in 2002.
Ezio Petersen UPI/Landov

Robert Sherman — one half of the songwriting team behind Disney movies and major hit musicals — has died. He was 86. The Oscar-winning Sherman Brothers, Robert and Richard, wrote some of the most enduring Disney songs of all time. Their output was astounding: Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, Bedknobs and Broomsticks, The Aristocats.

John Lasseter, of Pixar and Disney, once said, "You cannot forget a Sherman brothers song for your life."

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4:06pm

Mon March 5, 2012
Post Mortem: Death Investigation In America

Free, But Not Cleared: Ernie Lopez Comes Home

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:58 am

Ernie Lopez hugs his daughter, Nikki Lopez, for the first time since 2009. Ernie was released from prison on March 2 in Amarillo, Texas, after nine years, while he awaits a new trial.
Katie Hayes Luke Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Ernie Lopez calls it his "rebirth." After spending nearly nine years in prison for the sexual assault of a 6-month old girl, a top Texas court threw out the conviction. And on Friday, the 41-year-old Lopez walked out of the detention center in Amarillo, Texas, where family and friends were waiting.

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3:54pm

Mon March 5, 2012
Music Reviews

Bruce Springsteen's Hard-Bitten Pop Optimism

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 6:02 pm

Bruce Springsteen's 17th album, Wrecking Ball, has a little taste of almost every style he's ever played, including classic E Street rock 'n' roll.
Danny Clinch

Ever since The Rising in 2002 — and arguably since 1984's Born in the U.S.A.Bruce Springsteen releases have functioned as State of the Union addresses as much as pop LPs. Wrecking Ball does, too, beginning with its Occupy-era lead single "We Take Care of Our Own," an anthemic bit of wishful thinking which, like "Born in the U.S.A.," seems easy to misinterpret by 180 degrees if you don't pay attention to the verses between the chorus.

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7:00am

Mon March 5, 2012
Three Books...

Try And Try Again: 3 Tales Of Spectacular Failure

Originally published on Tue March 6, 2012 7:19 pm

Anna1975 flickr.com

Don't let the theme fool you. These three books are anything but failures. They are, in fact, full of sharply rendered and utterly original characters who fail spectacularly in their attempts to do right (or what they think is right). They are men on a mission, variously heroic, harebrained, heartfelt, even cruel, but their good intentions are undeniable, if not always admirable.

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4:43pm

Sun March 4, 2012
Author Interviews

They're Nobody And Want To Know Everything

Two mysterious men pull up to the courthouse and head to the public records office. They're strangers, and they ask a lot of strange questions like, "I'd like to look at Mayor John Doe's property deeds." Or, "I want to see Congressman Smith's voting records."

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2:25pm

Sun March 4, 2012
Author Interviews

A Road Trip In Search Of America's Lost Languages

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 1:38 pm

Trip of the Tongue cover detail
Bloomsbury Publishing

The vast majority of the 175 indigenous languages still spoken in the United States are on the verge of extinction.

Linguist Elizabeth Little spent two years driving all over the country looking for the few remaining pockets where those languages are still spoken — from the scores of Native American tongues, to the Creole of Louisiana. The resulting book is Trip of the Tongue: Cross-Country Travels in Search of America's Lost Languages.

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2:13pm

Sun March 4, 2012
Around the Nation

A Hollywood Writer's Second Act: Gongs

Originally published on Thu March 8, 2012 3:22 pm

Comedy writer Andrew Borakove left California for Lincoln, Neb., to sell gongs.
Guy Raz

There's a Mystery Machine sitting outside Andrew Borakove's nondescript warehouse on a quiet street in Lincoln, Neb.

"I can never be depressed driving around town, because there's always some 4-year-old waving to me manically," Borakove says.

The mystery about the Scooby Doo replica van starts to fade, however, once you notice the bumper stickers on the back. Black background, white font, like a "Got Milk?" ad: "Happiness Is a Warm Gong." "Gongs, Not Bongs." "My Child Is an Honor Gong Player."

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11:35pm

Sat March 3, 2012
Music Interviews

Suzanne Ciani, Trailblazing Synth Musician, Looks Back

Suzanne Ciani's new retrospective album, Lixiviation 1969-1985, presents long-form works alongside her many commercial projects.
Courtesy of the artist

Suzanne Ciani's start in music was traditional enough. She was classically trained, majored in music at Wellesley College, and got a fellowship to study composition at UC Berkeley. But when she arrived there in the mid-1960s, just in time to witness the student protests that consumed the Bay Area during that decade, her focus shifted.

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4:55pm

Sat March 3, 2012
Author Interviews

'Enchantments' Of Rasputin's Lion-Taming Daughter

Originally published on Sat March 3, 2012 5:09 pm

Rischgitz Getty Images

The famed mystic Rasputin — notorious for his otherworldly powers and his sexual escapades — may not have seemed like a traditional family man, but in fact, he had a wife and three children.

His eldest daughter, Maria, is at the center of Kathryn Harrison's new novel, Enchantments, a dark fairytale mash-up of history and magical realism set during the last days of Imperial Russia.

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