All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, and Melissa Block

This program presents a trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features. It rings with the disparate voices of its commentators, from veteran analyst Daniel Schorr and storyteller Kevin Kling to poet Andrei Codrescu. It hums with the distinctive music that threads between reports -- music collected in the online program All Songs Considered. And by the time All Things Considered marked its 30th anniversary on the air, the program had earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the Peabody, DuPont and Overseas Press Club awards.

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4:00pm

Fri July 4, 2014
Latin America

Graffiti Artist Sprays Brazil's Turmoil Across Its City Walls

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:27 pm

Paulo Ito's picture of a starving child left to dine on a soccer ball has been shared more than 50,000 times on Facebook.
Andre Penner AP

Brazilian street artist Paulo Ito has captured the spirit of the World Cup with two controversial images: One depicts a starving Brazilian boy with nothing but a soccer ball to eat; the other depicts even protesters watching the games on television. They both speak to viewers worldwide about the costs of staging the mega event. Ito explains what inspired his work and what's happening in Brazil.

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4:00pm

Fri July 4, 2014
Sports

Continental Rivals Take Spotlight In World Cup Quarters

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Brazil, tears of joy and relief as the World Cup home team won its quarterfinal against Colombia.

(CHEERING)

SIEGEL: Brazil beat Colombia 2-1 in a hard-fought game between the two South American neighbors, but as we'll hear, it was a costly victory. An earlier game today - Germany defeated France 1-nothing to move on to the World Cup final four. NPR's Tom Goldman is in Rio de Janeiro, and he joins us now. And, Tom, first of all, Brazil won. But in a way, it also lost. Tell us about that.

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5:45pm

Thu July 3, 2014
All Tech Considered

In A Battle For Web Traffic, Bad Bots Are Going After Grandma

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:05 am

By hijacking a user's computer, "bad" bots make it look as if she visits a website often, thus making the site more valuable to advertisers.
iStockphoto

As the Web turns 25, it's becoming a terrific place if you're a bot.

It began as a tool for human communication, but now, over 60 percent of the traffic on the Web is automated applications called bots talking to other bots, according to one study. And experts say about half of those bots are bad.

But first let's talk about the good bots.

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5:31pm

Thu July 3, 2014
Law

Top NYPD Cop: Stop-And-Frisk Is Not 'The Problem Or The Solution'

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:41 pm

The NYPD recently launched a study into what's causing a rise in shootings in the city. Commissioner William Bratton says it will examine a lot of factors, not just stop-and-frisk.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

It's been nearly a year since a court ruling curtailed the New York Police Department's controversial practice known as stop-and-frisk, but NYPD Commissioner William Bratton says the city can be just as safe without it.

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5:19pm

Thu July 3, 2014
NPR Ed

Coaching First-Generation Students Through College

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 6:08 am

One-third of college students are the first in their families to enroll in college. But few of them graduate within six years, according to the Department of Education.

One program is working to change that, one student at a time. Juma Ventures isn't just trying to get kids into college ... it's trying to get them through it.

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4:57pm

Thu July 3, 2014
Parallels

Deportation Threat Doesn't Diminish Young Migrants' U.S. Hopes

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 11:23 pm

Ezequiel Vazquez and his 15-year-old son, Ilbaro, leave a government-run shelter in Guatemala City. Ilbaro was deported from the U.S. after spending six months in a Texas detention facility. He returned with a U.S.- issued duffel bag full of clothes, shoes, books and toys.
Carrie Kahn NPR

The Obama administration says it will try to speed up deportations of tens of thousands of children who have illegally entered the U.S. from Central America in recent months. It's part of a stronger message the administration is hoping gets back to would-be migrants contemplating coming to the U.S.

But the message isn't getting through, and even those who have recently been deported say they will try again.

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4:57pm

Thu July 3, 2014
Latin America

Tiny Costa Rica Is A World Cup Surprise — Even To Its Own Fans

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

Costa Rica entered into the World Cup an underdog, but the team has emerged from group play having beaten three former World Cup winners. Costa Rican fan Ericka Mora speaks with Melissa Block from San Jose about the excitement in the country's capital.

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4:25pm

Thu July 3, 2014
Iraq

If Map Of Middle East Is Being Redrawn, What Lies Ahead For Kurds?

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

Violence in Iraq has many wondering if the map of the Middle East is being redrawn before the world's eyes. If so, Iraqi Kurds might stand to gain, with an independent Kurdistan finally within reach. Fuad Hussein, a strategist for the Kurdistan Regional Government, joins Robert Siegel to speak about Kurds' hopes and fears.

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4:09pm

Thu July 3, 2014
Environment

Study: Surge In Okla. Quakes Can Be Traced To Drilling Operations

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

StateImpact Oklahoma's Joe Wertz reports on a new study that links a "swarm" of earthquakes to four specific, high-volume oil and gas industry disposal wells. It's one of several reports that show oil and gas activity could be causing a rise in earthquake activity.

4:09pm

Thu July 3, 2014
Law

When Child Migrants Cross The Border, What Next Awaits Them?

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The influx of children coming up from Central America, through Mexico and across the U.S. border, has focused attention on U.S. immigration law and how it's applied. We're going to hear now from Dana Leigh Marks, who is an immigration judge. In fact, Judge Marks is president of the National Association of Immigration Judges. She joins us from San Francisco. Welcome to the program.

DANA LEIGH MARKS: Thank you so much for having me.

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6:22pm

Wed July 2, 2014
Book Reviews

A Writer Who Defied The System In 'The Zhivago Affair'

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 7:20 pm

What appeared in Soviet newspapers, magazines and books during the 1950s was processed through so many layers of censorship, that what ultimately emerged was mostly propaganda. Writers and poets who defied the system, went unpublished, lost their jobs and often their homes. Many were sent to the gulag, or died in the cellars of the KGB.

During the worst terror of the Stalin years, Boris Pasternak, the author of Dr. Zhivago, was left largely alone because, it was rumored, Stalin liked some of his poetry.

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5:34pm

Wed July 2, 2014
Men In America

Learning How To Be A Man, From Mom

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 9:29 am

Derek Williams says he learned more about being a man from his mother than his father.
Brett Myers Youth Radio

This story is part of All Things Considered's "Men in America" series.

Though my mom and dad often were on the outs, I'm not one of those kids whose dad was absent.

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5:31pm

Wed July 2, 2014
Around the Nation

Florida County Goes To Court Over 'Acid Fracking' Near Everglades

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 7:20 pm

In southwest Florida, county officials are fighting the state over a new oil drilling process that's known by many different names: acidification, acidizing, acid stimulation and acid fracking.

Collier County has charged that state regulators have been lax in their oversight of the drilling, jeopardizing public health and the environment.

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5:14pm

Wed July 2, 2014
Movie Reviews

Sci-Fi Kid Flick 'Earth To Echo' Broadens The 'E.T.' Formula

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 7:20 pm

In Earth to Echo, Brian "Astro" Bradley, Ella Wahlestedt, Reese Hartwig and Teo Halm play a group of kids whose neighborhood is being destroyed by a highway construction project, forcing their families to move.
Patrick Wymore Relativity Media

Movie theaters were swarming with Transformers this past weekend, and that'll also be true over the July 4 weekend. So this may not seem to be the best moment to bring out a sci-fi flick made on a budget that wouldn't cover catering for Optimus Prime. But "small" has its virtues sometimes, and the kid flick Earth to Echo is one of those times.

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4:34pm

Wed July 2, 2014
Parallels

A Scottish Yarn: A Knit In Time Saves The Fabric Of Shetland Life

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 7:20 pm

Ingrid Eunson sits at the spinning wheel in her home in the small town of Brae in Scotland's remote Shetland Islands. She knits yarn that she spins and dyes herself, traditions that her ancestors practiced for generations.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Drive around the Shetland Islands in the far north of Scotland, and at least one thing is immediately apparent: It's home to a lot of sheep. They're everywhere — wandering along the roadsides and on beaches.

In fact, there are some 400,000 of them in Shetland, where the ovine inhabitants outnumber the human ones 20 to 1.

So if you're invited to someone's home for dinner, lamb will likely be on the table. And if you're wearing a local scarf or mittens, chances are it was made out of Shetland wool.

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