Around and About Chattanooga

Wednesdays at 10 am & 8 pm

Around and About is a Chattanooga, Tennessee public radio show featuring news, interviews, and arts coverage. The show's host and reporters cover human-interest stories, Southern literature and current events & issues affecting the Tennessee Valley. 

Many guests are Chattanooga residents; others are national authors, experts and celebrities speaking on topics relevant to our community. The show is broadcast Wednesdays on WUTC NPR 88.1 FM, and the podcast is available here.

You can also subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

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City of Chattanooga

The new Chattanooga Police Chief says it was a humbling experience, being sworn in while a packed auditorium at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga watched. He felt honored. But it's only the beginning.

"For me, this just lights the fuse," Chief David Roddy said.  "I'm excited about getting to work."

Roddy expects to continue the police department’s commitment to developing community partnerships, because "officers can’t keep the city safe working alone. We need your help. We must build trust in order to maintain public safety and effective policing."

Prairie Home Productions

Although he's retired from hosting the radio version of A Prairie Home Companion, Garrison Keillor is bringing his live (non-broadcast) Prairie Home "Love and Comedy" Tour to Chattanooga's Tivoli Theatre on Saturday, September 9, 2017. This live performance features musicians Richard Dworsky and The Road Hounds and Heather Masse, and sound-effects wizard Fred Newman.

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof was reportedly Tennessee Williams’s favorite of all his plays. The Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga’s production of the play opens this Friday evening at 7:30. Richard Winham talked to the director, Garry Posey, who told him it’s a play about mendacity.

NPR's Live Eclipse Coverage

Aug 21, 2017
NASA

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The new school year is underway in Hamilton County. A new school superintendent, Dr, Bryan Johnson, the fourth person to hold the office since the city and county schools merged in 1997, has also begun working to help heal a school system many people feel is broken. In an editorial in the Chattanooga Times Free Press of August 11th, 2017, Pam Sohn wrote:

Business students at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga who want to be investment professionals have the chance to manage a lot of real money—thanks to a unique program called The SMILE Fund (Student Managed Investment Learning Experience). It's an investment portfolio of $250,000 endowed by the UC Foundation .

Chattanooga mayor's office

At a press conference, acting Chattanooga Police Chief David Roddy told reporters and officials a story about why he became an officer. He said, when he was growing up, he saw other kids being picked on.

“I saw stronger, bigger kids bullying kids who weren’t able to defend themselves,” he said. “I remember seeing this where I attended at Tyner High School when I saw a kid get picked on in gym class. And I knew then that the direction of my life was to help protect those that were unable to stand up for themselves.”

The River Gallery in Chattanooga's Bluff View art district is celebrating its 25th anniversary with a month-long show featuring three of the artists featured in the gallery’s first exhibition in 1992.

Richard Winham talked to Mary Portera, who together with her husband, Dr. Charles Portera, has developed the artisanal complex on the bluff above the Tennessee River in downtown Chattanooga.

WUTC

It was a bit of a bumpy road, creating the new budget for the city of Chattanooga. But one possible result: fewer bumpy roads.

“We are putting five million dollars into street paving,” Maura Sullivan, the city’s Chief Operating Officer, said as she and other officials presented the proposed budget during a City Council meeting Tuesday evening.

State lawmakers passed the IMPROVE Act, which increases Tennessee’s tax rate at the gas pump, giving the city new funds for road repairs. But the IMPROVE act also cuts the Hall income tax and the state's sales tax rate on food, which means less revenue for city expenses like pensions for employees and other benefits.

Located at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the Educational Opportunity Center (EOC) offers free advising and information to those who want to enter or continue college and who do not already have a four-year degree.

Technology can be pretty distracting at the dinner table, when people are texting instead of talking to their family members. But technology has the opposite effect at Sue's Tech Kitchen. Serving sweet treats inspired by STEM education, the place gets kids and parents interacting with each other and playing with high-tech gadgets that combine coding and dining. For example, a robot controlled by candy.

Alaska.gov

In Alaska, rides to a hospital can cost a small fortune.

“Our uniqueness comes from the fact that 82% of our communities are not connected by roads,” Alaska Governor Bill Walker told NPR in a recent interview. “So we don't take a $300 ambulance ride to the hospital. We take a $50,000 to $150,000 Medevac. Our costs of health care are certainly the highest in the nation.”

Online grocery service Instacart is now available in Chattanooga. Richard Winham talked to Jennifer O’Shaughnessy, the area manager responsible for setting up the service in Chattanooga.

Three years ago, Jennifer Holder and Shawanda Mason Moore had $100 and a dream of bringing people together across the city. They started The Chattery, a nonprofit that offers classes in practically any subject someone is willing to teach. (Recently, Sean Phipps gave a short course on how to smoke a pipe properly.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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