Around and About Chattanooga

Mondays & Wednesdays at 10 am & 8 pm

Originating as a Chattanooga, Tennessee public radio show, Around and About Chattanooga features news, interviews, and arts coverage. In particular, the show covers human-interest stories, Southern literature and discussion of current events. Some guests are Chattanooga residents; others are national authors, experts and celebrities. The show is broadcast Mondays & Wednesdays on WUTC NPR 88.1 FM, and more information is at www.wutc.org.

Comments? Story ideas? You can contact the public affairs desk at (423) 425-2224.

Dr. Martha Summa-Chadwick nerds out about the power music has to affect the quality of life. She is the Executive Director of Music Therapy Gateway in Communications, Inc. She joins us today to talk about how music is an ancient language that can help patients suffering from autism, PTSD, and Parkinson's disease. MTGIC has a free concert, Quartet for the End of Time, coming up November 18th, and Dr. Summa-Chadwick is also telling us composer Oliver Messiaen had a neurological disorder, synesthesia, and composed the quartet while being held captive as a POW during World War II.

Governor Bill Haslam created Insure Tennessee to help 280,000 low-income residents in the state get health insurance. But a small group of Republican lawmakers in the state Senate Health Committee killed the plan before it got off the ground, which inspired the creation of Women for Tennessee's Future, an organization opposing Republicans by grooming female Democratic candidates to run for office.

Wearing a "Make American Great Again" hat and dancing at the Hamilton County GOP election night party, local resident Matthew Huckabee described Donald Trump by using an odd but affectionate phrase:

"He is what he is," Huckabee said, musing about Trump's sometimes-abrasive personality. "He's a monster of his own. But a monster for the American people."

U.S. Congressman Chuck Fleischmann, a Republican incumbent from Tennessee who won re-election on the same night Donald Trump won the electoral college, also cheered Trump's surprise victory.

WUTC has been interviewing Hamilton County major party candidates ahead of Tuesday's vote. On this episode of Around and About Chattanooga, we hear excerpts from our conversations with Melody Shekari, Chuck Fleischmann, Khristy Wilkinson, and Todd Gardenhire. Extended interviews, transcripts, and conversations with more candidates are here.

  WANT TO LISTEN LIVE? CLICK HERE FOR WUTC HD-2, or use the player above.

The Library, a play by Scott Burns, now at the Chattanooga Theatre Center in the Circle Theater, looks at the aftermath of a school shooting, the shattered lives of the survivors, and the sometimes conflicting stories they tell. Richard Winham talked to the play’s director, Scott Dunlap.  

The 2016 Head of the Hooch Regatta will bring thousands of competitors and spectators to the downtown Chattanooga riverfront, and is expected to have a 5 million dollar economic impact on the city. Organizer Paul Gaigelas joins us to preview the boat race.

WUTC SPECIAL BROADCAST: Tune in on Saturday, November 5th at 1 to 2 pm for a live remote from the waterfront.

Hugh Hamrick

When he's not writing bestselling books like When You Are Engulfed in Flames and Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls, or reading essays on NPR, David Sedaris is walking alongside roads in England, picking up cans and candy bar wrappers and trash. Nobody asks him to do it, and nobody pays him--he's simply obsessed with picking up litter. In this interview, he explains how that obsession inspired the title of his next book, Theft By Finding. 

In The Hidden Brain, NPR's Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to unearth patterns, biases, and triggers that drive human behavior. He is speaking with us about the new season of the podcast and what illuminating topics listeners can anticipate. The new season includes a series exploring issues on the minds of voters during the political season; specifically, a nuanced and surprising discussion about immigration and how immigrants who've been settled in the United States for twenty years can be wary of new comers.

Leslie Jordan, a Chattanooga native and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga alumnus, won an Emmy in 2006 for his role on Will & Grace. He's also appeared on Desperate HousewivesBoston Legal and American Horror Story.

Guy Raz hosts two popular NPR podcasts: the TED Radio Hour, which launched in 2012, and How I Built This, a new one focusing on entrepreneurship. Both are very high on the iTunes charts right now. He joins us to explain why he started this new one, some of his favorite podcasts, and why he believes NPR produces so many of the best podcasts.  

Governor Bill Haslam has joined a growing number of Republican politicians calling for Donald Trump to quit campaigning in light of his vulgar comments about women in a video released Friday.

In a statement released today, Haslam said:

 This past Summer 26 people ranging in age from 40 to 70 went away to Summer Camp for the weekend. The organizers called it Boomer Camp. It was at Camp Ocoee and for a couple of days in addition to wine tastings and a smoked salmon supper, they kayaked, canoed, hiked, swam and sang songs around a fire like kids at camp. “It was an opportunity to play and have fun without feeling guilty about it,” said one.

The camp was a big success; the organizers had hoped for eight people, 26 signed up.

 

A new election race has begun in Chattanooga. With so much focus on Trump and Clinton, you might have missed the kickoff.

On August 30, Larry Grohn, the District 4 Councilman in Chattanooga, announced he would be running for mayor.

That vote is about five months away, in March of 2017. 

Grohn says violence in the city, a lack of housing, and a lack of workforce development are issues he wants to address in his campaign. 

“As well as our city is doing,"he says, "we can do better in these regards."

Reflections Gallery on Lee Highway features the work of local artists here in Chattanooga. Two of the artists whose work is part of the current exhibition talked to Richard Winham about their work.  

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