Around and About Chattanooga

Wednesdays at 10 am & 8 pm

Around and About is a Chattanooga, Tennessee public radio show featuring news, interviews, and arts coverage. The show's host and reporters cover human-interest stories, Southern literature and current events & issues affecting the Tennessee Valley. 

Many guests are Chattanooga residents; others are national authors, experts and celebrities speaking on topics relevant to our community. The show is broadcast Wednesdays on WUTC NPR 88.1 FM, and the podcast is available here.

You can also subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

Comments? Story ideas? Email us.

CBS

Mimi Kennedy was destined for fame; as a child, she wanted to be an actress, and throughout her career, Broadway, the big screen and TV have served her well, making her face familiar to almost everyone. She's also an author and activist, and she's chatting with WUTC about her on- and off-stage roles in life, starting with her portrayal of Jan in both the original Broadway and National Touring productions of Grease.

Ashley Evans, Executive Director of the free health clinic Volunteers In Medicine, joins us to talk about a CVS Health Foundation Grant the clinic recently received to tackle a significant local health problem: diabetes. Also, we talk about the clinic's 2nd Annual Run for Health at Camp Jordan on June 3rd.

FROM A MEDIA RELEASE:

The song “Change” explains why people around the nation are leaving coins at the graves of soldiers, sailors, and other military service members. 

YouTube

Why don't people sing together anymore? During the Civil Rights movement, marchers used songs to bond with each other, but modern protest movements don't necessarily unite the same way. 

Dr. Ysaye Barnwell encourages people to put down their phones and make real-world connections through the power of group singing.

WUTC

Click this link to hear the winning story.  

WUTC FM 88.1, the National Public Radio affiliate licensed to the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, has been awarded a 2017 Edward R. Murrow Award for feature reporting.

Paula Poundstone

The red Lamborghini did little to improve Paula Poundstone's mood.

She says she was "feeling like a jerk" as she drove it through Los Angeles, a self-inflicted experiment to discover the secret to happiness.

"We live in a world where there's a lot of people who don't have homes," she says. "And who wants to drive by that in a Lamborghini? You know, I don't like walking by it to get on the train. So it just it creates a much more stark reminder of the inequities, you know, the imbalance in in our world. And you know normally I just walk down the street feeling helpless to help people."

She also tried camping, taekwondo, volunteering and other activities as she searched for deep personal satisfaction. Some became habits.

Lea Shell / StudentsDiscover.org

Kirk Englehardt takes us to Dr. DeAnna Beasely’s classroom, where the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga professor is convincing students to get down and dirty with ants. The tiny creatures can teach us a lot about urban landscapes’ effect on insect life and about our changing environment.

Jen Lewin's please-touch-the-art approach to public sculpture inspired The Pool. The globe-trotting installation will be on display in Chattanooga April 21-30, and by "on display," I mean that you're invited to jump and dance and boogie all over it and see how it reacts.

WUTC's Spring Membership Drive continues today, and when you donate, you could win an invite to a VIP meet-and-greet Friday with Paula Poundstone. She's performing at Track 29 in Chattanooga. Tune in to 88.1 for details.

The Muse of Fire Project is an opportunity for children from Chattanooga aged between 10 and 13 to write a play for adult actors. The children, mentored by working actors, meet every Monday after school for ten weeks in the Chattanooga Downtown Public Library where they slowly develop their plays. Richard Winham talked to three of the young playwrights as well as three of the actors and mentors who work with them in the project.

The idea for Tennessee author/biologist David George Haskell's new book The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature's Great Connectors came from an almost offhand remark he made while teaching at The University of the South in Sewanne. 

Welcome Home of Chattanooga provides compassionate end-of-life care to homeless people and those in need. The organization's first all-day conference is happening April 21st, and Roy Remer from San Francisco's Zen Hospice Project is the keynote speaker. Remer and Welcome Home co-founder Sherry Campbell join us to talk about demystifying death and dying.

When noted playwright Arthur Miller wrote “All My Sons,” he has been quoted as saying it was his “final attempt at writing a commercially successful play.” Had the play not been a success he reportedly said he would “find some other line of work.”

The two artists behind Squonk Opera—Steve O’Hearn, who is part visual artist/part construction engineer, and his partner, composer Jackie Dempsey—aim to create work that is “fast, funny, shameless and inclusive.” Richard Winham talked to Steve O’Hearn on the telephone from Pittsburgh, where he and his partner live and work. Also in the studio were Bob Boyer, the director of the Patten Performance Series here at UTC, and Lisa Darger from UTC’s Office of Sustainability.

The University of Tennessee Chattanooga has said the decision to terminate the employment of reporter Jacqui Helbert was made by university officials, not the news editors at WUTC. The station's news staff says the decision to remove from WUTC's website the story that Helbert had done about meetings held by state legislators with students from a Gay-Straight Alliance Club was also made by university officials, not WUTC's editors.

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