Around and About Chattanooga

Wednesdays at 10 am & 8 pm

Around and About is a Chattanooga, Tennessee public radio show featuring news, interviews, and arts coverage. The show's host and reporters cover human-interest stories, Southern literature and current events & issues affecting the Tennessee Valley. 

Many guests are Chattanooga residents; others are national authors, experts and celebrities speaking on topics relevant to our community. The show is broadcast Wednesdays on WUTC NPR 88.1 FM, and the podcast is available here.

You can also subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

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The latest Southern Tour of Independent Filmmakers screening will feature A Good Man, a documentary about controversial choreographer Bill T. Jones.  Several years ago, the Ravinia Festival asked Jones to create a dance production based on Abraham Lincoln's life.  Documentary filmmakers Gordon Quinn and Bob Hercules spent two years chronicling Jones's creative process.

Local Writer Sells Short Stories to Grove/Atlantic

Mar 6, 2012

Jamie Quatro is a fiction writer who lives on Lookout Mountain. Her first book of short-stories will be published by Grove/Atlantic in 2013. Her work has appeared in Tin House, Ploughshares, and McSweeney’s. Garrett Crowe spoke with Jamie Quatro about becoming a writer, her influences, and rejection. She also reads excerpts from her story “Holy Ground”.

The State Collaborative on Reforming Education, SCORE, is hosting a series of discussions across the state of Tennessee seeking feedback on the new teacher evaluation system.  SCORE invites educators, administrators, parents and business leaders to attend the sessions and provide feedback on the successes and challenges with the new evaluation process.  The organization will provide a report in June with the results of the feedback discussions and other data gathering instruments.  The goal is to assess the

Dr. Lin Jun Wang is a professor at UTC who believes wholeheartedly in a scientific theory he came up with. Most scientists would call him crazy, but he's on a mission to share his theory about the nature of the universe with as many people as possible.

 

H*ART Gallery on Main Street sells the work of unconventional artists, like homeless people, people with disabilities, and refugees. Now, the gallery is helping put some of that art into the homes of unconventional collectors, too: homeless people who are moving into a new home. Mary Helen Miller spoke with Ellen Heavilon, the executive director of H*ART Gallery, and Jamie McConnico, a seventh grader who helped start the new program.

The River City Company is celebrating 25 years of working with the community to build a better Chattanooga.  The Urban Design Challenge is part of that celebration.  In this challenge design teams are provided with an area of the city in need of a makeover and the teams develop a concept to improve the location with the future of the city in mind.  Three teams have already presented their concepts.  There are six total teams in the Urban Design Challenge.  The fourth team

The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga's College of Business has partnered with Oklahoma State’s School of Entrepreneurship to introduce a program designed to help disabled veterans improve business management and entrepreneurship.  The Veterans Entrepreneurship Program  will offer training and mentoring to veterans that own or want to own their own business. 

Rylan Steele has created a series of photographs that cause viewers to take a closer look at ordinary workspaces--the clutter and the cleanliness of offices, warehouses and other spaces we inhabit every day but rarely think about.

Tucked away off Main Street, The Camp House is a warehouse that has been converted to a coffee house and music venue.  It features an intimate setting and multi-track recording--in fact the facility, was originally designed to double as a music recording space for the Mission Chattanooga.  Now it's home to a local blend of coffee and different music performances each day of the week. 

Miki Boni and Tom Paulsin put a lot of work into transforming an old house in the Southside District into a contemporary, comfortable art gallery. Now when visitors come, they hope they’ll enjoy the art and stay awhile. A long while. Maybe overnight or for the weekend.

The blood supply in the Chattanooga area is lower than it should be, and it’s been that way all year. Blood Assurance collects blood for more than 50 health care facilities in the region. And they say that donations tend to drop off in the winter. Mary Helen Miller visited the Blood Assurance donation center and lab at the Chattanooga headquarters.  She got some first-hand insight into the blood shortage in the area.

Intensive Family Intervention teams help keep families together in Georgia.  The teams go into homes and work with parents whose children have been diagnosed with mental illness, substance abuse problems or behavioral disorders.  Sometimes these children are on the verge of being sent to a mental health facility, a juvenile detention center or foster care, and IFI teams work to prevent that.

IFI services are funded by Georgia Medicaid, and families must meet specific requirements to qualify.

For the last couple of years, the Planet Altered Gallery on Chattanooga’s Southside has held fundraising events called CAFE Grant Suppers.  At these events, people pay $12 for dinner.  During the dinner, artists and creative people who could use extra money to fund their work give pitches.  People listen to the pitches, vote, and then the winning artist receives most of the money people paid for dinner–often several hundred dollars total.  It’s a way for the Southside community to gather, enjoy food and fun, and support a local artist.

“I don’t ever talk to anybody who’s older than me,” John Flansburgh says in this interview with WUTC 88.1 FM’s Richard Winham.  Both Flansburgh and Winham have been in the music business for decades.  Winham, the host of WUTC’s afternoon music show, started his radio career in 1972.  Flansburgh’s music career began in 1982, when he and John Linnell founded the band They Might Be Giants.  In this extended, informal conversation, Winham doesn’t exactly interview Flansburgh–instead, these two music-industry veterans wind up interviewing each other, comparing their musical tastes and contrastin

Jonathan Coulton used to write computer programs.  Now he writes about programmers–his songs like Code Monkey are funny, occasionally melancholy ballads about geek culture: burnt-out code warriors, zombie office workers and mournful, lonely sea monsters.

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