Fresh Air on WUTC

Weekdays, Noon - 1pm
Terry Gross

Fresh Air with Terry Gross, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Each week, nearly 4.5 million people listen to the show's intimate conversations broadcast on more than 450 National Public Radio (NPR) stations across the country, as well as in Europe on the World Radio Network.

Though Fresh Air has been categorized as a "talk show," it hardly fits the mold. Its 1994 Peabody Award citation credits Fresh Air with "probing questions, revelatory interviews and unusual insights." And a variety of top publications count Gross among the country's leading interviewers. The show gives interviews as much time as needed, and complements them with comments from well-known critics and commentators.

Fresh Air is produced at WHYY-FM in Philadelphia and broadcast nationally by NPR.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f829e1c8daeab91b0296|5187f820e1c8daeab91b0269

Pages

3:51pm

Wed August 15, 2012
Music Reviews

How Jan Garbarek Came To Epitomize Nordic Jazz

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 3:22 pm

A new box set of early albums captures Jan Garbarek's forming saxophone sound β€” austere and astringent.
Roberto Massoti ECM Records

Saxophonist Jan Garbarek was a teenage protege of American composer George Russell in Norway in the 1960s and later played in Keith Jarrett's Scandinavian quartet. More recently, he has collaborated with the vocal quartet the Hilliard Ensemble, improvising as they sing medieval music.

Read more

12:55pm

Tue August 14, 2012
Author Interviews

Climate 'Weirdness' Throws Ecosystems 'Out Of Kilter'

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 1:47 pm

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the past year through June 2012 has been the hottest year in the continental U.S. since modern record-keeping started in 1895. Above, New Yorkers flocked to Coney Island to try to beat the heat in early August.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Science journalist Michael Lemonick doesn't want to be a doomsday prophet, but he does want to be realistic about the threat of climate change. "Since I started writing about climate change all the way back in 1987, we've known what the cause is, we've known what the likely outcome is, and we've had time to act β€” and essentially we haven't acted," he tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

Read more

11:30am

Tue August 14, 2012
Arts & Life

With Ryan's Ascent, A Few Thoughts On 'Entitlement'

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 3:27 pm

Rep. Paul Ryan has made changes to social safety net programs like Medicare and Social Security β€” often called "entitlements" β€” a key part of his political agenda.
Win McNamee Getty Images

People are saying that Mitt Romney's selection of Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan as his running mate creates an opportunity to hold what Ryan likes to call an "adult conversation" about entitlement spending. In the present political climate, it would be heartening to have an adult conversation about anything. But bear in mind that "entitlement" doesn't put all its cards on the table. Like a lot of effective political language, it enables you to slip from one idea to another without ever letting on that you've changed the subject.

Read more

12:34pm

Mon August 13, 2012
Author Interviews

Looking To The 'Stars' For A Reason To Live

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 12:51 pm

iStockphoto.com

When Peter Heller sat down to work on his first novel, all he knew was that he wanted to have the experience of writing without knowing the ending. As an expedition kayaker, Heller was already the author of many works of travel and outdoor-adventure writing. With his debut novel, The Dog Stars, Heller returned to fiction β€” his first love. But as the novel took a post-apocalyptic turn, he found himself relying on his real-life scrapes and survival skills.

Read more

9:03am

Sat August 11, 2012
Interviews

Fresh Air Weekend: Chris Rock, Dan Auerbach

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 10:04 am

Chris Rock stars as Julie Delpy's boyfriend in 2 Days in New York. Delpy directed the film, a follow-up to her 2007 romantic comedy 2 Days in Paris.
Walter Thomson Magnolia Pictures

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Read more

2:14pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Remembrances

David Rakoff: 'There Is No Answer As To Why Me'

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 7:28 am

Writer and humorist David Rakoff, who died Thursday at the age of 47, wrote with a perfect balance of wit and gravity about the cancer that would ultimately take his life.

Rakoff developed a devoted following as a regular contributor to the public radio program This American Life. His books of essays include Fraud and Don't Get Too Comfortable. Rakoff's most recent book, Half Empty, won the Thurber Prize for American Humor in 2011.

Read more

2:32pm

Thu August 9, 2012
Movie Interviews

Chris Rock On The Funny Business Of Finding Success

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 3:01 pm

"I don't believe I can offend you in a comedy club," Rock says. Star comedians use comedy clubs to try out new material. "I think that's the deal that's made when you see a famous guy in one of these clubs."
Michael Parmelee Magnolia Pictures

How much funny family dysfunction can you pack into two days? Plenty, if you're Mingus and Marion (Chris Rock and Julie Delpy) an interracial, multinational Manhattan couple β€” each with kids from previous relationships β€” hosting Marion's family visiting from France. The film, 2 Days in New York, is a sequel to Delpy's 2007 film, 2 Days in Paris.

Read more

11:47am

Thu August 9, 2012
Movies

60 Years Later, Still 'Singin' In The Rain'

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 2:37 pm

Gene Kelly stars as Don Lockwood in Singin' in the Rain. In celebration of the 1952 musical's 60th birthday, a newly restored print was released in theaters for a one-night public screening, and a new edition has been released on DVD and Blu-Ray.
Warner Home Video

Hollywood is often at its best when it's making fun of itself, and few movies are funnier or more fun than Singin' in the Rain, the broadly satirical musical comedy about the transition from silent movies to sound.

Gene Kelly, who co-directed the film with Stanley Donen, stars as the stuntman turned matinee idol who falls in love with adorable Debbie Reynolds. He even gets to parody his own swashbuckling in MGM's Technicolor Three Musketeers.

Read more

1:03pm

Wed August 8, 2012
Music Interviews

Susie Arioli On Fresh Air

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 8:03 am

Susie Arioli's new album, All the Way, was released in June.
Marianne Larochelle

Fresh Air's Terry Gross has been listening to jazz singer Susie Arioli since she first heard Arioli's 2002 album Pennies From Heaven. Arioli is Canadian and has a big following there, but she's not well known in the U.S., and hasn't toured in many American cities. So when Arioli and her longtime guitarist and arranger, Jordan Officer, stopped in for an in-studio concert and conversation, Gross was thrilled.

Read more

1:03pm

Wed August 8, 2012
Movie Reviews

Sixty And Sexless, But 'Hope Springs' Eternal

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 2:58 pm

In Hope Springs, Kay (Meryl Streep) forces Arnold (Tommy Lee Jones) into a week of couples therapy after she gets tired of β€” among other things β€” sleeping in separate bedrooms.
Barry Wetcher Sony Pictures

The last time my 14-year-old daughter saw me and my wife being affectionate, she said, "Ewwww, old people kissing." Now, I'm not so old β€” barely half a century. But let's be frank. My daughter's no different from many people whose objects of fantasy are young and freakishly fit. So even a mild, cutesy little comedy like Hope Springs about two sexagenarians trying to have sex can seem shocking, even transgressive.

Read more

2:06pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Book Reviews

'Dreamland': Open Your Eyes To The Science Of Sleep

iStockphoto.com

Step, if you will, into my bedroom at night. (Don't worry, this is a PG-rated invitation.) At first, all is tranquil: My husband and I, exhausted by our day's labors, slumber, comatose, in our double bed. But, somewhere around 2 a.m., things begin to go bump in the night. My husband's body starts twitching, like Frankenstein's monster receiving his first animating shocks of electricity. Thrashing about, he'll kick me and steal the covers. In his dreams, he's always fighting or being chased; one night he said he dreamt Dick Cheney was gaining on him.

Read more

1:51pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Remembrances

Fresh Air Remembers Military Historian John Keegan

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 3:03 pm

British military historian John Keegan chronicled the history of warfare from Alexander the Great to the U.S. invasion of Iraq. He died Thursday at age 78.
Jerry Bauer Random House

British military historian John Keegan spent his life studying war, but he never fought in one and described himself as more or less a pacifist. Keegan, who died Thursday at age 78, chronicled the history of warfare from Alexander the Great to the U.S. invasion of Iraq, and was considered one of the foremost military historians of his generation. His books included A History of Warfare and The Face of Battle.

Read more

1:35pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Author Interviews

'Antietam' Dissects Strategies Of North And South

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 2:23 pm

In the earliest days of the Civil War, the Union Army focused on cutting off key supply lines on the periphery of the South. The approach was designed to hurt the South's economy and convince its citizens to return to the Union.

Even though President Lincoln said slavery was unjust, in the earliest days of the war he told the Southern states that he wouldn't interfere with slavery as an institution.

Read more

1:54pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Television

Dean Norris On Playing Good In 'Breaking Bad'

Dean Norris plays DEA agent Hank Schrader in AMC's Breaking Bad. "He's a good cop, he just hasn't put the pieces together yet," Norris says.
Ben Leuner AMC

With each season of AMC's Breaking Bad, Dean Norris' character, DEA agent Hank Schrader, has evolved from a knuckleheaded jock into a complex, sympathetic and even heroic counterpoint to the show's anti-hero, high-school chemistry teacher turned meth cook Walter White. And to further complicate matters, Schrader and White (played by Bryan Cranston) are brothers-in-law.

Read more

11:58am

Mon August 6, 2012
Music Reviews

Dan Auerbach Likes It Fast, Simple And Loud

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 1:23 pm

Producer Dan Auerbach achieves an ideal version of JEFF The Brotherhood and Hacienda on their respective new albums.
James Quine

Dan Auerbach, one of two founders of The Black Keys, also maintains an active side business as a producer for other bands that share his love for blues- and country-influenced rock. Auerbach's production work can be heard on two new records: Hacienda's third album, Shakedown, and the major-label debut of JEFF The Brotherhood, titled Hypnotic Nights.

Read more

Pages