Morning Edition

Weekdays at 6am
Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 13 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

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4:51am

Fri July 5, 2013
Education

Education Reform Movement Learns Lesson From Old Standards

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:08 am

Advocates for Common Core standards say it will be harder for states to hide their failing schools.
iStockphoto.com

Common Core — the new set of national education standards in math and English language arts — will take effect in most states next year. This move toward a single set of standards has been embraced by a bipartisan crowd of politicians and educators largely because of what the Common Core standards are replacing: a mess.

In years past, the education landscape was a discord of state standards. A fourth grader in Arkansas could have appeared proficient in reading by his state's standards — but, by the standards of another state, say Massachusetts, not even close.

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4:51am

Fri July 5, 2013
Movie Interviews

Oscar Winners Rash And Faxon Team Up Again For 'The Way, Way Back'

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 6:13 pm

Duncan's summer is filled with awkward — and often adult-initiated — situations involving the girl next door (Annasophia Robb).
Claire Folger Fox Searchlight

The coming-of-age story is a summer-movie staple — as writers Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, who struck Oscar gold with The Descendants in 2011, can attest.

Their latest film, The Way, Way Back, is another entry in the canon; it's the tale of an awkward teenager, Duncan, who's floundering through a seaside vacation when he's taken under the wing of Owen, the sweetly demented manager of a summer water park. Comedy ensues — and in passing, Duncan learns some important lessons about adulthood.

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4:51am

Fri July 5, 2013
Media

Louisville TV Station Promises Not To Hype Breaking News

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 5:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In local television news, one of the most basic ways to appeal to viewers is the constant promise of breaking news. As NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik reports, one station in Louisville, Kentucky is taking a different approach and it's beginning to win attention for it.

DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: The spot is for WDRB television in Louisville.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SPOT)

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3:37am

Fri July 5, 2013
National Security

NSA's Reach Leads To Calls For Updated Eavesdropping Laws

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:18 am

National Security Agency headquarters at Fort Meade, Md.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

The continuing leak of classified information by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden has renewed a debate about the U.S. government's power to reach secretly into the personal lives of its citizens.

But there is at least one point on which both privacy advocates and security experts agree: The laws governing electronic eavesdropping have not kept pace with technology.

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3:35am

Fri July 5, 2013
Law

Whose Term Was It? A Look Back At The Supreme Court

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:03 pm

Chief Justice John G. Roberts (left) and Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

It would not be an exaggeration to call the recently completed Supreme Court term a lollapalooza. Day-by-day on the last week of the court term, the justices handed down one legal thunderbolt after another: same-sex marriage, voting rights, affirmative action. The end-of-term crush of opinions made so many headlines that other important decisions got little public notice.

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3:34am

Fri July 5, 2013
Europe

Are Things Too Cozy In London's 'City' Within A City?

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 2:33 pm

Skyscrapers in the City of London, the heart of the financial district, are reshaping the skyline.
Dan Bobkoff NPR

For at least a millennium, the heart of Britain's commercial and financial industries has been the City of London.

The City is not the large metropolis we know as London. It's much older and smaller. Many call it the Square Mile, though it's not square and a bit bigger than a mile. It's the home to big banks, medieval alleyways and St. Paul's Cathedral. And, for all those centuries, the area has had the same local government with an unusual name: The City of London Corporation.

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2:06am

Fri July 5, 2013
On Aging

Seniors Flex Creative Muscles In Retirement Arts Colonies

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 4:51 am

Buster Sussman, 86, shown with his art instructor, Randall Williams, is a former real estate reporter who only recently started painting. His paintings were on display at the Burbank Senior Artists Colony.
Ina Jaffe NPR

Some famous writers, painters and musicians have done some of their best work in their later years — impressionist Claude Monet, for one. But at the North Hollywood Senior Arts Colony, older people are proving that you don't have to be famous — or even a professional artist — to live a creatively fulfilling life in old age.

With a fully equipped theater and painting and sculpture studios, there seems to be rehearsals or exhibitions of some sort going on here all the time.

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1:39am

Fri July 5, 2013
StoryCorps

Two Brothers Remember Lives Spent With Liberty

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 4:51 am

The Bizzaro brothers — James, 81 (left) and Paul, 82 — spent their childhoods living in a house right behind the Statue of Liberty.
StoryCorps

Brothers Paul and James Bizzaro, both in their 80s, spent their childhoods living in a house right behind the Statue of Liberty. Their family moved to the same small island in New York Harbor as Lady Liberty 75 years ago this summer, not long after their father, also James, became a guard at the statue.

When the Bizzaros moved to what's now called Liberty Island in 1937, Paul was 8 and James was 6.

"Half of the island was for the visitors. The half that we lived in, we had that whole half to us," says James.

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10:03pm

Thu July 4, 2013
Planet Money

Why Doesn't Everybody Buy Cheap, Generic Headache Medicine?

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 9:03 pm

Same pills. Lower price.
Paul Sancya AP

Why does anyone buy Bayer aspirin — or Tylenol, or Advil — when, almost always, there's a bottle of cheaper generic pills, with the same active ingredient, sitting right next to the brand-name pills?

Matthew Gentzkow, an economist at the University of Chicago's Booth school, recently tried to answer this question. Along with a few colleagues, Gentzkow set out to test a hypothesis: Maybe people buy the brand-name pills because they just don't know that the generic version is basically the same thing.

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8:53am

Thu July 4, 2013
Around the Nation

Stars, Spangles And Lots Of Security At Boston's July 4 Events

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 1:43 pm

Mary Ann Rollings (from left), Gloria Kelley and Linda Lee Stacy were bursting in red, white and blue as they turned out to hear their beloved Boston Pops.
Courtesy of Sammy Stalcup

The Fourth of July show will go on as usual tonight in Boston. For the 40th year in a row, the Boston Pops will perform along the banks of the Charles River as fireworks burst overhead.

But the scene and the mood will be different, with heavy security measures in the wake of the recent Boston Marathon bombings. It's in the back of many people's minds that the July 4 celebration was apparently the original target until, police say, the bombers decided to attack the race instead.

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7:47am

Thu July 4, 2013
Around the Nation

Park Service Cleans Up Eggs In Death Valley

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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7:21am

Thu July 4, 2013
Around the Nation

Strike In Oakland Causes Parking Meter Confusion

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:48 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. You ever sense a smile on the face of people who write your parking tickets, as if they enjoy calling you out for letting your meter expire? When Oakland, California cities employees went on a one day strike, residence thought that meant no parking enforcement. But one parking officer decided to cross the picket line and write tickets. He said he was happy with his pay and didn't want to go on strike. Employee of the Month, no, the city said all of the tickets he wrote would be voided.

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5:03am

Thu July 4, 2013
Around the Nation

The Declaration: What Does Independence Mean To You?

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:48 am

Kara, Michael, Mikaila and Cameron Milton of Greensboro, N.C., pose for a portrait near the Lincoln Memorial on June 21, after reading the Declaration of Independence for Morning Edition.
Erica Yoon NPR

We often celebrate Independence Day with backyard barbecues and fireworks, forgetting the document that started this whole country: the Declaration of Independence.

For the past 20 years Morning Edition has asked NPR hosts and reporters to read the document on the Fourth, as a reminder of our country's history. This year, we decided to ask visitors at the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to give it a try.

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5:03am

Thu July 4, 2013
Business

SoftBank Moves Closer To 78 Percent Stake In Sprint

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the Federal Communications Commission has apparently approved a deal giving the Japanese telecom giant SoftBank a controlling stake in SprintNextel, which is the third-largest wireless operator in the U.S. Experts say SoftBank's industry clout should help Sprint become a more robust competitor. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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4:42am

Thu July 4, 2013
Law

Zimmerman Trial Takes July 4 Off, Case Resumes Friday

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's get an update now on the Trayvon Martin murder case being held in Sanford, Florida. The state is expected soon to wrap up its case against George Zimmerman. He's the neighborhood watch volunteer who shot and killed the unarmed teenager. In a week and a half of testimony, prosecutors have painted a picture of Zimmerman as a wannabe cop, someone who profiled Trayvon Martin and then, after he shot Martin, tailored his story to fit Florida's self-defense law.

NPR's Greg Allen reports.

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