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Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 13 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

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6:28am

Mon May 27, 2013
Around the Nation

107-Year-Old Veteran Attributes Yard Work To Long Life

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Richard Overton is staying at home on this Memorial Day, and he deserves it. At 107 years of age, he's thought to be the nation's oldest living veteran. Overton served in the South Pacific in World War II. He says he's lived this long thanks to aspirin, a stress-free life and by keeping busy in his yard. He also says a little whiskey in his coffee helps to, as he put it, keep his muscles tender.

On this Memorial Day, I'm raising my mug to you, Mr. Overton.

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5:11am

Mon May 27, 2013
Afghanistan

Food Entrepreneur Is A New Breed Of Afghan Business Owner

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 10:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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4:47am

Mon May 27, 2013
Europe

France Pays Tribute To Early U.S. Fighter Pilots

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 8:47 am

A memorial outside Paris honors members of the Lafayette Squadron, which was started by a group of young American men in 1914 who wanted to fight for France when World War I broke out. The U.S. had not yet entered the war.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Every Memorial Day weekend, a ceremony takes place just outside Paris to honor a group of Americans who fought in France. They're not D-Day veterans, but a little known group of pilots who fought for France in World War I, before the U.S. entered the war.

This year's ceremony in the tiny town of Marnes-la-Coquette began with a flyover by two French air force Mirage fighter jets from the Escadrille Lafayette, or Lafayette Squadron, paying tribute to the men who founded the group nearly 100 years ago.

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4:47am

Mon May 27, 2013
Around the Nation

Post Sandy: Jersey Shore Celebrates Memorial Day Holiday

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's go now to the Jersey Shore. As Scott mentioned, businesses are re-opening. Most beaches and boardwalks were ready for the Memorial Day weekend crowds. But months after Sandy, some towns are still rebuilding - in some cases, just starting the demolition phase.

Here's Tracey Samuelson, from member station WHYY.

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4:47am

Mon May 27, 2013
Business

Hulu's Future Depends On Which Company Buys It

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:06 am

Multiple companies — from Time Warner Cable to Yahoo — are said to be interested in acquiring Hulu. The site streams TV shows and movies online. Some shows on Hulu are free, but paid subscribers get access to more programming.

4:47am

Mon May 27, 2013
Around the Nation

Overshadowed By Moore, Carney, Okla. Recovers From Twister

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:19 am

Moore, Okla., has gotten the lion's share of resources and attention following last week's tornado. A tornado hit Carney, Okla., last week too. No one died in Carney, but three dozen homes were damaged or destroyed — a big blow to a tiny town.

3:32am

Mon May 27, 2013
The Salt

Twinkies' Return Is Mostly Sweet News For Kansas Town

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:17 am

Hostess Twinkies are offered for sale in Chicago, part of the last shipment of Hostess products the company made in 2012.
Scott Olson Getty Images

The news of Hostess' return to Emporia, Kan., sparked an ecstatic response in this beleaguered town — even though there will be only half as many jobs.

The new company, formed when investors bought Hostess' snack cake business, has hired longtime snack cake production veterans Pat Chambers and her husband, Bob, to help get the bakery here running again. Pat lost her job at the Hostess plant when it closed last November. Now, she sits beaming on her front porch, wearing a dirty Hostess work shirt.

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3:31am

Mon May 27, 2013
Shots - Health News

For Many, Affordable Care Act Won't Cover Bariatric Surgery

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 4:00 pm

Evidence is growing that bariatic surgery reduces health risks of obesity.
Life in View Science Source

Uninsured Americans who are hoping the new health insurance law will give them access to weight loss treatments are likely to be disappointed.

That's especially the case in the Deep South, where obesity rates are among the highest in the nation, and states will not require health plans sold on the new online insurance marketplaces to cover medical weight loss treatments like prescription drugs and bariatric surgery.

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3:30am

Mon May 27, 2013
Shots - Health News

Overweight People Are More Apt To Ditch Doctors

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 8:08 am

Going to the doctor may be uncomfortable for people who are worried about weight.
iStockphoto.com

Patients struggling with obesity can have a tough time finding the right doctor, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

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7:01am

Fri May 24, 2013
Around the Nation

NYC Mayoral Candidate Uses Wrong Skyline On His Homepage

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:01 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Some photos on Twitter ended Anthony Weiner's congressional career. The latest online image, not quite as damaging. Weiner launched his campaign yesterday to be mayor of New York City, and a gorgeous city skyline showed up on his homepage: the skyline of Pittsburgh, my home town. I'm honored if the Web designer is impressed with our city's skyline.

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6:56am

Fri May 24, 2013
Europe

Germany's Beer Makers Come Against Fracking

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:01 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Fracking may have met its match in Germany, where beer makers have lined up against it. Fracking, of course, is a way of bringing up natural gas by pumping water and chemicals into the ground. Germany's powerful beer industry is concerned fracking would pollute groundwater.

Half of Germany's 1,300 brewers have their own wells, and say the pure water is the essence of their famous beers. And if there's one thing Germans take seriously, it's beer.

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5:31am

Fri May 24, 2013
Business

Business News

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:01 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a comeback.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Procter & Gamble made a surprise announcement last night. It's bringing back its former CEO as the company's new CEO. A.G. Lafley will replace Bob McDonald. Procter & Gamble is behind names like Crest toothpaste and Tide laundry detergent. The 170-year-old company has been struggling to grow in emerging markets. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

5:31am

Fri May 24, 2013
Business

Insurers Picked For California Health Exchange

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:01 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

More, now, on the new federal health care law. States are preparing for that law to take effect. In California, officials have now unveiled plans - and prices - for millions of residents who will be using a new health insurance exchange to purchase their coverage next year. This is a key test of the federal health law's ability to draw competitive bids from insurance companies. Sarah Varney reports.

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4:11am

Fri May 24, 2013
Parallels

China's Air Pollution: Is The Government Willing To Act?

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 11:55 am

Skyscrapers are obscured by heavy haze in Beijing on Jan. 13. Air pollution remains a serious — sometimes overwhelming — problem, but researchers say environmental technology is available to solve it.
Ng Han Guan AP

Denise Mauzerall arrived in Beijing this year at a time that was both horrifying and illuminating. The capital was facing some of its worst pollution in recent memory, and Mauzerall, a Princeton environmental engineering professor, was passing through on her way to a university forum on the future of cities.

"I took the fast train from Beijing to Shanghai, and looking out the window for large sections of that trip, you couldn't see more than 20 feet," Mauzerall recalled.

To Mauzerall, the lesson was surprising and inescapable.

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3:18am

Fri May 24, 2013
Planet Money

Can This Man Bring Silicon Valley To Yangon?

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 9:29 am

Lam Thuy Vo NPR

Like a proud father, Nay Aung opens up his MacBook Air to show me the Myanmar travel website he has built. But we wait 30 seconds for the site to load, and nothing happens.

"Today is a particularly bad day for Internet," he says. This is life in Myanmar today: Even an Internet entrepreneur can't always get online.

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