Morning Edition

Weekdays at 6am
Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 13 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

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6:54am

Mon May 20, 2013
Around the Nation

Right Lottery Numbers, Wrong Date

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 6:55 am

A California woman turned on the TV last week and saw she had the winning numbers in Wednesday's drawing. She thought she had won $360 million. It turns out she bought her ticket an hour after Wednesday's drawing.

5:15am

Mon May 20, 2013
Around the Nation

Growing Vegetables From Seeds Takes Root For Many Gardeners

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 5:20 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's planting season, at least for those growing things like summer squash, beans and cherry tomatoes. And we're seeing a change. Rather than buy already developed seedlings, which are more expensive, many gardeners are buying seed packets. It's a sign they want to start their gardens from scratch. And seed companies say they've seen an increase in orders since the economic downturn.

Reporter Sasa Woodruff reports that it's easy to read the directions on these seed envelopes, the hard part is following them.

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5:06am

Mon May 20, 2013
Energy

Calif. Law To Require Ships To Cut Pollution

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 5:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Two ports, the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, handle almost half of all of the consumer goods being shipped into the United States. Together, these two ports are also the single largest polluter in Southern California, a region famous for its smog.

NPR's Kirk Siegler reports on a new California law that will soon require some of the largest diesel-guzzling ships to kill their engines and plug in to shore power at the docks.

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5:06am

Mon May 20, 2013
Business

Yahoo To Buy Tumblr In An Attempt To Revitalize Itself

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a big blogging buyout.

Today, Yahoo announced its purchase of the blogging site Tumblr. The $1.1 billion deal was unanimously approved by Yahoo's board. Analysts say the acquisition is Yahoo's attempt to revitalize itself.

NPR's Kirk Siegler has more.

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3:07am

Mon May 20, 2013
Around the Nation

Advocates Struggle To Reach Growing Ranks Of Suburban Poor

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 2:30 pm

TD Bank volunteers sort donated food into barrels at the Manna Food Center in Gaithersburg in Montgomery County, Md. Poverty in the county just outside Washington, D.C., has grown by two-thirds since 2007.
Gabriella Demczuk NPR

Poverty has grown everywhere in the U.S. in recent years, but mostly in the suburbs. During the 2000s, it grew twice as fast in suburban areas as in cities, with more than 16 million poor people now living in the nation's suburbs — more than in urban or rural areas.

Elizabeth Kneebone, a fellow with the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution, says this shift in poverty can be seen in Montgomery County, Md., right outside the nation's capital.

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3:07am

Mon May 20, 2013
It's All Politics

Is There Really A Second-Term Curse?

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 11:15 am

Richard Nixon says goodbye to members of his staff outside the White House as he boards a helicopter after resigning the presidency on Aug. 9, 1974.
AP

The phrase "second term curse" is so familiar that it's become a cliche of American politics. Whether it's President Richard Nixon's resignation or President Bill Clinton's impeachment, presidents tend to have a tough time during the back half of an eight-year presidency.

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3:06am

Mon May 20, 2013
Arts & Life

Nostalgia For Sale As Captain Kangaroo's Pals Are Auctioned Off

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 10:38 am

More than 500 items from the Captain Kangaroo show — including Dancing Bear's life-sized costume.
Nate D. Sanders Auction House

The classic children's show Captain Kangaroo aired on TV for nearly 30 years, starting in 1955. After its creator and star, Bob Keeshan, died in 2004, his estate donated a few of his beloved hand puppets to the Smithsonian.

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7:27am

Fri May 17, 2013
Around the Nation

Washington D.C. Man Advertises For Wedding Date

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with best wishes to a man on Craigslist. He advertised for a date to attend a wedding. The Washington, D.C., man says he had a last-minute cancellation. Ladies, you could accompany him. He describes himself as a clean man with a job and no arrest record, who adds: I don't like murder. For extra motivation, he promises an open bar, and adds: You only YOLO once.

YOLO is you only live once, so that's you only you only live once once. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

7:19am

Fri May 17, 2013
Around the Nation

Theater Lover Takes A Stand Against Annoying Cell Phone

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 11:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Kevin Williamson took a stand against annoying cell phone use. The National Review writer attended a musical in New York and says the crowd was disruptive. One woman was Web surfing on her phone, violating theater rules. Mr. Williamson tells Gothamist he complained to the woman. She replied: So don't look. That's when Williamson grabbed her phone and threw it across the theater, an offense for which he says he's glad to go to jail if he is prosecuted.

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5:14am

Fri May 17, 2013
Around the Nation

After Shooting, New Orleans Area Begins To Return To Normal

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 11:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news, New Orleans police have arrested six people after last Sunday's shooting spree at a Mother's Day parade. Two of those suspects, brothers, face 20 counts of attempted murder after 20 people were injured. The shooting galvanized residents of a city with one of the world's higher murder rates. Keith O'Brien has the story.

KEITH O'BRIEN, BYLINE: Residents at the intersection of Frenchman and North Villere Streets were thrilled to see it yesterday morning, a produce truck selling fruits and vegetables, door to door.

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5:07am

Fri May 17, 2013
Afghanistan

Select Young Afghans Chosen As Commandoes In Training

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 2:11 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

All right, through much of this week, we've been hearing from young Afghans on the future of their country after NATO troops withdraw in 2014. Yesterday, our colleague Renee Montagne met with the American general who commands coalition forces in Afghanistan. They traveled to a special forces base where young Afghan men - and a few women - are being trained.

(SOUNDBITE OF HELICOPTER)

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5:07am

Fri May 17, 2013
Commentary

Kiss In 'Bombay Talkies' Breaks New Ground In Bollywood

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 6:31 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This weekend, the Cannes Film Festival pays tribute to the 100th anniversary of Indian movies. It will host the world premier of a film called "Bombay Talkies." Commentator Sandip Roy says one scene in that movie breaks new ground for Bollywood.

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5:07am

Fri May 17, 2013
Business

Obama Names OMB Controller As Acting IRS Commissioner

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 5:25 am

On Thursday, President Obama named Daniel Werfel, 42, acting IRS commissioner. The announcement comes a day after the resignation of Steven Miller, who got caught up in the controversy over the IRS targeting Tea Party groups.

3:06am

Fri May 17, 2013
StoryCorps

A Gift Of Life And Friendship After A Family's Loss

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 5:14 am

Six years ago, Rick Bounds was told he would die without a kidney and liver transplant. Today he is a triathlete, thanks to donor organs from Dorothy Biernack's late husband, Marty.
StoryCorps

Today, Rick Bounds is a 58-year-old triathlete, with four competitions and a 100-mile bike ride to his credit.

But six years ago, he was diagnosed with a nonhepatitis liver disease. Rick's doctors told him that if he didn't have an immediate kidney and liver transplant, he would die.

He was given eight months to live and told that his chances of getting organs were slim.

'No Hope'

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3:04am

Fri May 17, 2013
Planet Money

Why Is There An Ammunition Shortage In The U.S.?

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 10:04 pm

"We're going to keep prices as fair as we possibly can," says Bob Viden of Bob's Little Sport Shop in southern New Jersey.
Marianne McCune NPR

Sales of guns and ammunition rose after President Obama took office in 2008, and they went through the roof starting late last year, when a school shooting led to a push for new gun control measures. That's led to a prolonged ammunition shortage, even with manufacturers running at full capacity.

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