Morning Edition

Weekdays at 6am
Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 13 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f827e1c8daeab91b0271|5187f820e1c8daeab91b0269

Pages

5:08am

Thu November 15, 2012
Books

'Round House' Wins National Book Award For Fiction

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 4:42 pm

Eric Miller AP

The National Book Awards announced Wednesday night honored both longtime writers and new authors, from Louise Erdrich who won for her novel The Round House to Katherine Boo, who was honored for her debut nonfiction work, Behind the Beautiful Forevers.

Erdrich has been a highly regarded author for nearly 30 years. She'd been a finalist twice before but said being honored is "all the more meaningful when you're older ... because you don't know if your years of writing at your very best are behind you."

Read more

5:06am

Thu November 15, 2012
NPR Story

Scandal Shines Light On Tampa Social Scene

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 5:29 am

Along with the news about the Gen. David Petreus scandal, we've been hearing about lavish social events given in the Tampa, Fla., area. A lot of military brass from MacDill Air Force Base, where U.S. Central Command is headquartered, go to these events. Linda Wertheimer talks to Ben Montgomery, a reporter with the Tampa Bay Times, about how the scandal is playing out around Tampa.

5:06am

Thu November 15, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 7:21 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with Twinkie trouble.

Hostess Brands, famous for processed treats like Twinkies and Ding Dongs, says it will go into liquidation if striking bakers do not return to work this afternoon. This could see the layoffs of nearly 18,000 workers. The bakers walked out over wage and benefit cuts. Analysts say the company's most iconic brands would likely be bought by other companies if Hostess goes out of business. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

4:46am

Thu November 15, 2012
NPR Story

Studies Vary On How Many Jobs Will Be Lost If Taxes On The Wealthy Ride

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 7:07 am

Republicans claim President Obama's plan to raise taxes on the wealthy will cost the economy 700,000 jobs. Another study from the Congressional Budget Office puts the number of lost jobs as 200,000. But both studies also assume millions of new jobs will be created.

4:05am

Thu November 15, 2012
Politics

Obama's Visit To Myanmar: Too Much, Too Soon?

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 8:15 pm

A newspaper with a front-page photo of President Obama is displayed at a press house in downtown Yangon, Myanmar, on Thursday, ahead of Obama's visit.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

When President Obama sets off to Asia this weekend to highlight his so-called pivot to the region, he will make a bit of history: Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Myanmar.

The country, also known as Burma, was a pariah state for decades, ruled by a ruthless military dictatorship. That is changing, and the Obama administration has encouraged a dramatic reform process in the country. But it may be too early for a victory lap.

Read more

4:04am

Thu November 15, 2012
Planet Money

Why Coke Cost A Nickel For 70 Years

Originally published on Mon November 19, 2012 2:04 pm

An oilcloth sign advertising Coca-Cola from 1905.
The Coca-Cola Company

Prices change; that's fundamental to how economies work.

And yet: In 1886, a bottle of Coke cost a nickel. It was also a nickel in 1900, 1915 and 1930. In fact, 70 years after the first Coke was sold, you could still buy a bottle for a nickel.

Three wars, the Great Depression, hundreds of competitors — none of it made any difference for the price of Coke. Why not?

Read more

7:35am

Wed November 14, 2012
Around the Nation

Airline Strips Cello Of Frequent Flyer Miles

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more

7:31am

Wed November 14, 2012
Around the Nation

Police Pick Up Car Thief Turned Delivery Man

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. A driver delivering takeout for a Chinese restaurant left his car running while he ran in an order. He comes back and guess what? No car. He called his boss, who called the next customer on the route to apologize. But they had their takeout. The car thief-turned delivery man made a few extra bucks. But at the next house on his route the cops were waiting. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

5:25am

Wed November 14, 2012
National Security

Scandals Muddles Military Recommendations

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. We've steadily been learning more about the people at the center of a military scandal. Retired general - and CIA director - David Petraeus resigned because of an affair.

INSKEEP: The affair was discovered when his mistress confronted another woman.

Read more

5:25am

Wed November 14, 2012
NPR Story

Some Nonprofits Look Suspiciously Like Forprofits

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 5:33 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The word nonprofit evokes the image of a charity or a church, an educational institution, public radio station. But David Evans of Bloomberg Markets Magazine took a closer look at the world of nonprofits and discovered something that he considered suspicious. Even though many nonprofits make millions and millions in profits, they pay no taxes.

Read more

5:25am

Wed November 14, 2012
NPR Story

Congress' Lame Duck Session Could Be Memorable

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Congress is beginning a busy post-election session. Lawmakers have weeks to prevent higher taxes and spending cuts due to take effect at the end of the year. Then there are hearings on the deaths of four Americans in Benghazi, Libya and the scandal over the affair that ended the career of CIA Chief David Petraeus. Here's NPR's David Welna.

Read more

3:19am

Wed November 14, 2012
Humans

Study: Reading 'Maxim' Can Make You A Theft Target

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:06 am

TK
iStockphoto.com

Some time ago, a man wearing jeans, cowboy boots and a hoodie drove a dirty Ford Explorer into a carwash in Fort Worth, Texas. As soon as the car came back clean, he got it filthy again, and drove to the next carwash. He did this with every single full-service carwash in town.

The man wasn't suffering from a strange mental disorder; Patrick Kinkade was a criminologist conducting an experiment.

Read more

3:18am

Wed November 14, 2012
Environment

A 'Green' Gold Rush? Calif. Firm Turns Trash To Gas

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:17 pm

Energy Of The Future? California company Sierra Energy is testing out a reactor that turns garbage — like these wood chips, metal fragments and plastics — into synthetic gas that can then be turned into a low-carbon diesel fuel.
Christopher Joyce NPR

Second of a two-part series. Read Part 1

California starts the ball rolling Wednesday on a controversial scheme to keep the planet from overheating. Businesses will have to get a permit if they emit greenhouse gases.

Some permits will be auctioned today; the rest are free. The big idea here is the state is putting a ceiling on emissions.

It's a gamble. And for this top-down climate plan to work, it has to usher in a greener, more efficient economy.

Read more

3:17am

Wed November 14, 2012
The Record

A&M Records: Independent, With Major Appeal

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 5:12 pm

Herb Alpert (left) and Jerry Moss, who founded A&M Records in Alpert's garage in 1962.
Courtesy of A&M Records

10:03pm

Tue November 13, 2012
Sweetness And Light

Dear Sports Czars: Take Your Ball And Go Home

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:06 am

Czars.

It was fun to call American sports commissioners czars, but once players started to have unions, a commissioner really became more like a majority leader in a legislature, trying to keep his party — the owners — together in their financial battles against the minority opposition, the athletes.

Read more

Pages