Morning Edition

Weekdays at 6am
Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 13 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

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4:29am

Wed June 6, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:07 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business this morning is: litigious days.

(SOUNDBITE OF "HAPPY DAYS" THEME SONG)

MONTAGNE: That, of course, is the theme from "Happy Days," the hit sitcom from the 1970s and '80s. These days, not everyone is so happy. Several cast members from the show are battling with CBS and Paramount, for unpaid royalties.

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4:29am

Wed June 6, 2012
Europe

Baltic States Embrace Eurozone

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:07 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Here a couple of the more alarming warnings coming out of the eurozone this week. Greece says it could go broke by July. Spain says it probably can't raise money from investors because they're demanding interest rates that are too high.

Despite all these troubles, one country is still eager to join the eurozone: Latvia. In fact, all three Baltic States remain supportive of the euro.

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4:29am

Wed June 6, 2012
Business

States End Extended Benefits Despite Dismal Economic Outlook

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:07 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

So far this year, 25 states have ended the Extended Benefits program. That program made sure people out of work for long periods of time continued receiving financial assistance. But there was a catch: if a state's unemployment rate improved, the money would stop flowing. The fact that some states are seeing lower unemployment may seem like a good sign for the economy. It's no comfort to the people who are still out of work.

Susie An from WBEZ in Chicago has that story.

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2:57am

Wed June 6, 2012
Sweetness And Light

Please Sir, I'd Rather Have Another

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:07 pm

Triple Crown hopefull I'll Have Another is ridden by exercise rider Jonny Garcia during a morning workout at Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y.
Al Bello Getty Images

To be perverse, I'd suggest that for the horse-racing industry, it'd be best that I'll Have Another does not — yes, does not — win the Triple Crown this Saturday.

Oh, certainly, absolutely every year you want a horse to win the first two races — the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness — so that suspense builds and a horse has a chance to win the Belmont and take the Triple Crown. But isn't it better to have the potential winner barely get beat so that the losing streak continues, building interest?

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2:56am

Wed June 6, 2012
Planet Money

Why Does The Mortgage-Interest Tax Deduction Still Exist?

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:07 pm

Alex Brandon AP

This is the latest story in our series on money in politics.

If you have a mortgage on your home, you can deduct the interest from your taxes. It's a popular, well-entrenched policy. But according to one policy adviser to a U.S. senator, "the mortgage-interest deduction, from a purely policy perspective ... makes no sense."

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2:55am

Wed June 6, 2012
Europe

A Party On The Rise, Germany's Pirates Come Ashore

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:07 pm

A member of the German Pirate Party, with its logo shaved in his hair, attends the party's two-day conference in Neumuenster, Germany, on April 28.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

They don't have a plan to save the euro or draw down the war in Afghanistan, nor do they have clear policies on an array of issues, but the German Pirate Party is winning converts and elections with its vision of digital democracy through "liquid feedback."

Despite public relations mishaps and a haphazard organizational structure, the Pirate Party is shaking up the stolid, bureaucratic world of German politics and jolting rival parties with its rising popularity.

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2:54am

Wed June 6, 2012
Revolutionary Road Trip

Once Tolerated, Alcohol Now Creates Rift In Tunisia

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:07 pm

Children ride the train, hopping in and out of the open doors, from Tunis to the suburb of Sidi Bou Said.
John Poole NPR

Over the next couple weeks, NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is taking a Revolutionary Road Trip across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves as they write new social rules, rebuild their economies and establish new political systems. Steve and his team will be traveling some 2,000 miles from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, across the deserts of Libya and on to Egypt's megacity of Cairo. In this story, he looks at the friction that has developed over alcohol in Tunisia.

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2:53am

Wed June 6, 2012
American Dreams: Then And Now

Grad Who Beat The Odds Asks, Why Not The Others?

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:07 pm

Juan Carlos Reyes is studying for his master's degree. The son of poor Dominican parents, Reyes is convinced his success is an aberration and wonders about the kids from his neighborhood who were left behind.
Claudio Sanchez NPR

Fewer than 5 percent of Americans had completed college when historian James Truslow Adams first coined the term "American dream" in 1931.

Today, many consider higher education the gateway to a better, richer and fuller life. But for many kids growing up in poverty, college might as well be Mars, and the American dream a myth.

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7:31pm

Tue June 5, 2012
American Dreams: Then And Now

'My Country': tUnE-yArDs Questions The American Dream

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:07 pm

Merrill Garbus is the singer and songwriter behind the band tUnE-yArDs.
Chloe Aftel Courtesy of the artist

7:43am

Tue June 5, 2012
Animals

Artist Takes Taxidermy To New Heights

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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7:38am

Tue June 5, 2012
Around the Nation

Castle In Phoenix Sells For $1.5 Million

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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7:05am

Tue June 5, 2012
Business

Jubilee Offers Brittons A Break From Economic News

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business this morning is: Jubilation.

Hundreds of thousands of Britons gathered outside Buckingham Palace last night for the Diamond Jubilee concert, celebrating the queen's 60-year reign. The evening offered a break from Britain's bad economic news and another opportunity to rebrand positively the Royal Family.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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6:18am

Tue June 5, 2012
Middle East

Sectarian Syrian Group Blamed In Houla Massacre

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The massacre in the place known as Houla has kept worldwide attention on the relentless violence in Syria. Western countries and the United Nations blame Syrian government troops and pro-government thugs for killing more than a hundred people, nearly half of them children. NPR's Kelly McEvers made a closer examination of those events and found that's only part of the picture.

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5:40am

Tue June 5, 2012
Business

Obama Courts Female Voters With Fair Pay Bill

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the Senate votes today on legislation aimed at shrinking the pay gap between men and women. It's called the Paycheck Fairness Act.

NPR's Ari Shapiro reports President Obama is using the bill as a tool in the 2012 campaign.

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5:29am

Tue June 5, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 6:57 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Disney delving into nutrition.

Today, Disney comes out with nutritional standards for food advertised across its platforms. The company has taken flack for contributing to the obesity epidemic by airing ads for junk food that targets kids.

This move marks a dramatic change, but the company's chairman told The New York Times, quote, "this is not altruistic; this is about smart business." Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

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