Morning Edition

Weekdays at 6am
Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 13 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

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4:55am

Tue July 3, 2012
NPR Story

'Game Of Thrones' Cookbook

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 3:26 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And before kicking off Pie Week, MORNING EDITION sponsored a pie contest here in the office. One of our winners was science editor Maria Godoy, who baked a medieval pork pie.

MARIA GODOY, BYLINE: It was a sweet and savory dish made of ground pork and currants, dates and honey. And then I got these dragon figurines breathing flames to sort of guard the dish.

MONTAGNE: Maria was inspired by the fantasy novel and HBO series "Game of Thrones."

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC, "GAME OF THRONES")

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4:55am

Tue July 3, 2012
NPR Story

100 Meter Runoff Canceled, Tarmoh Pulls Out Of Race

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 6:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The U.S. Olympic Track and Field trials soared to a start last month in Eugene, Oregon, with a world record in the decathlon. Yesterday, the trials limped to a controversial end. A planned 100 meter run-off was canceled between sprinters Allyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh after Tarmoh decided not to race.

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4:55am

Tue July 3, 2012
NPR Story

Daycare Needs Stretch Around The Clock

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 5:29 am

As more people take shift work in the still struggling economy, the need for after hours child care has increased. Throughout the country, many daycare centers have begun offering evening hours or 24-hour care. Parents say their kids should be sleeping at home at night, but they have no choice but to work when jobs are available.

4:55am

Tue July 3, 2012
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 8:02 am

In France, a law just took effect that requires all drivers, including tourists, to buy a breathalyzer test to keep in their cars. Drunk driving is huge problem in France — causing more accidents per year than speeding. It was recently discovered that the head of the group that lobbied for the law also works for a company that makes the kits.

4:55am

Tue July 3, 2012
NPR Story

Business News

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 7:53 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with another bye-bye at Barclays.

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4:55am

Tue July 3, 2012
NPR Story

Storm Leaves Illinois Residents Without Power

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 6:56 am

No power and high heat equal no fun in parts of Illinois. Some worry that July 4 celebrations will be affected.

4:55am

Tue July 3, 2012
NPR Story

The History Of Pie

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 2:11 pm

It's Pie Week on Morning Edition, and we wanted to know more about where pie comes from. Linda Wertheimer talks to food anthropologist Deborah Duchon about the history of pie.

3:31am

Tue July 3, 2012
Middle East

Can Sanctions Force Iran To Change Its Policies?

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 8:17 am

Iranian workers make repairs to a unit at Tehran's oil refinery in November 2007. It's estimated that a Western oil embargo is costing Iran about $4.5 billion each month in lost revenue.
Vahid Salemi AP

Whether economic sanctions can force a government to change course is far from clear, but Iran should be a good test case.

A European Union embargo on Iranian oil took full effect this week, complementing U.S. measures that have grown much more severe in recent weeks. Other Western sanctions now in place target Iranian banks, foreign companies that provide shipping insurance for Iranian oil tankers, and foreign firms that invest in the Iranian oil industry.

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3:30am

Tue July 3, 2012
Science

When Ice Cream Attacks: The Mystery Of Brain Freeze

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 2:12 pm

NPR interns (from left) Angela Wong and Kevin Uhrmacher participate in an experiment to induce brain freeze.
Benjamin Morris NPR

If it hasn't happened to you, count yourself as lucky. For many people, eating ice cream or drinking an icy drink too fast can produce a really painful headache. It usually hits in the front of the brain, behind the forehead.

The technical name for this phenomenon is cold-stimulus headache, but people also refer to it as "ice cream headache" or "brain freeze."

The good news is that brain freeze is easy to prevent — just eat more slowly. The other bit of good news is these headaches don't last very long — a minute at the outside.

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3:28am

Tue July 3, 2012
Books

Dog Memoirs Will Fetch, Sit And Stay On Your Shelf

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 2:13 pm

Gromit is the purebred Pembroke Welsh corgi belonging to NPR's Julie Rovner — who says she's hoping to eventually adopt a companion pooch named Wallace.
Julie Rovner

The Morning Edition mailboxes are always overflowing with books sent by publishers. And recently, a fair number have fallen into a category you might call "dog memoirs" — books about how dogs transform their owners' lives.

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3:20am

Tue July 3, 2012
Author Interviews

A Cautionary Tale About Transforming Afghanistan

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 1:05 pm

Scores of Americans engineers worked in southern Afghanistan from the late 1940s to the late 1970s to build two large dams and a canal network. The development project soon became a vast experiment in social engineering. New villages were constructed, with schools and health clinics. A new, modern society was to rise from the desert.
Courtesy of the U.S. National Archives via Foreign Policy

The plan in Afghanistan was ambitious. Americans would set up a base in one of the most remote parts of one of the world's most isolated countries. The project would last many years and cost large sums of money. And in the end, Afghanistan, or at least one small part of it, would be a new, modern country.

When Americans think of large-scale U.S. involvement in Afghanistan, most would point to the Sept. 11 attacks that prompted the American invasion of the country in 2001.

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3:19am

Tue July 3, 2012
Asia

Cheered In Europe, Suu Kyi Faces Crises In Myanmar

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 10:23 am

Rohingya Muslims, trying to cross the Naf river into Bangladesh to escape sectarian violence in Myanmar, look on from an intercepted boat in Teknaf, June 13. The plight of the Rohingya minority is one of the tests Suu Kyi faces at home.
Munir Uz Zaman AFP/Getty Images

There are few opposition leaders who are welcomed abroad with the same pomp and ceremony as heads of state. But that's the sort of star treatment lavished on Aung San Suu Kyi, opposition leader of Myanmar, also known as Burma, on her three-week tour of Europe.

But pressure is increasing on her to address simmering political crises at home, and to move her country's democratic changes forward.

In Geneva, Oslo, Dublin, London and Paris, Suu Kyi issued eloquent pleas for ethical foreign investment in Myanmar and foreign support for her country's ongoing reforms.

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12:36pm

Mon July 2, 2012
Asia

'Political Crisis' Faces Hong Kong's New Leader

Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying and his wife, Regina, shake hands with supporters Sunday during a flag-raising ceremony to mark the 15th anniversary of Hong Kong's handover to China. Leung was sworn in as Hong Kong's third leader amid growing discontent with China's rule over the Asian financial center.
Kin Cheung AP

It's a pretty bad first day at work when hundreds of thousands of people march through the streets calling for your resignation. That's what happened Sunday to Hong Kong's new leader, Leung Chun-ying, who was appointed by Beijing. The huge turnout presents new problems for China amid its own difficult power transition.

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7:35am

Mon July 2, 2012
Around the Nation

Art Thief Returns Stolen Salvador Dali Drawing

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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7:23am

Mon July 2, 2012
Around the Nation

Daredevils Try Out Adult-Size Hot Wheels Track

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Hot Wheels and their twisty plastic tracks have long been a source of small scale thrills. But on Saturday, daredevils Tanner Foust and Greg Tracy went behind the miniature. They raced two rally cars around a 66-foot tall version of a Hot Wheels loop-de-loop racetrack. Seven times gravity was the hardest part. The only thing broken was a world record. Don't try this at home. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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