Arts & Culture

Leah Weiss's debut novel If the Creek Don't Rise features an unusual storytelling structure: each chapter is told from one character's point of view, so the story is revealed through ten different voices. Set in 1970s Appalachia, it's about Sadie Blue, a pregnant teenager who must free herself from an abusive marriage, and about others in town--especially women--who help her. 

Mark A Herndon

In 2009, photographs of Wayne White's art were collected in a 400-page hardcover book, Maybe Now I'll Get The Respect I So Richly Deserve. White had worked for years behind the scenes at children's shows such as Pee Wee's Playhouse, designing puppets and sets. He was also the art director for music videos such as Peter Gabriel's "Big Time."

His artistic sensibilities influenced many young viewers. But few knew his name.

Nathan Kilpatrick creates custom frames for customers’ paintings at Reflections Gallery on Lee Highway. He’s also a painter and sculptor. He likes to work with found objects—pieces of wood that have washed up on the shore or that he finds discarded in trash piles.

He has an exhibition of his work opening at Reflections Gallery this Friday, September 15th. Richard Winham stopped by the gallery to look at some of his work and to talk to him about his unusual approach to framing and sculpture. 

Prairie Home Productions

Although he's retired from hosting the radio version of A Prairie Home Companion, Garrison Keillor is bringing his live (non-broadcast) Prairie Home "Love and Comedy" Tour to Chattanooga's Tivoli Theatre on Saturday, September 9, 2017. This live performance features musicians Richard Dworsky and The Road Hounds and Heather Masse, and sound-effects wizard Fred Newman.

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof was reportedly Tennessee Williams’s favorite of all his plays. The Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga’s production of the play opens this Friday evening at 7:30. Richard Winham talked to the director, Garry Posey, who told him it’s a play about mendacity.

The River Gallery in Chattanooga's Bluff View art district is celebrating its 25th anniversary with a month-long show featuring three of the artists featured in the gallery’s first exhibition in 1992.

Richard Winham talked to Mary Portera, who together with her husband, Dr. Charles Portera, has developed the artisanal complex on the bluff above the Tennessee River in downtown Chattanooga.

This summer the Signal Mountain Playhouse is mounting a production of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Many community theater groups may have found just building the sets for this show to be more than they wanted to handle, but the Signal Mountain Playhouse has a group of set designers who relish a challenge. Last summer they built a flying car for Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. This year they’ve built Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory.

“Are we really done with windows?” asks one of the characters in Courtney Maum’s new novel Touch.

He’s not talking about the operating system.

“I mean the architectural component that lets in light,” he says. “I mean, if I have a window, then—and this is really modern—I can just look through it and decide all by myself how to dress. I don’t need my home automation system to send me a text.”

CBS

Mimi Kennedy was destined for fame; as a child, she wanted to be an actress, and throughout her career, Broadway, the big screen and TV have served her well, making her face familiar to almost everyone. She's also an author and activist, and she's chatting with WUTC about her on- and off-stage roles in life, starting with her portrayal of Jan in both the original Broadway and National Touring productions of Grease.

The song “Change” explains why people around the nation are leaving coins at the graves of soldiers, sailors, and other military service members. 

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Why don't people sing together anymore? During the Civil Rights movement, marchers used songs to bond with each other, but modern protest movements don't necessarily unite the same way. 

Dr. Ysaye Barnwell encourages people to put down their phones and make real-world connections through the power of group singing.

Paula Poundstone

The red Lamborghini did little to improve Paula Poundstone's mood.

She says she was "feeling like a jerk" as she drove it through Los Angeles, a self-inflicted experiment to discover the secret to happiness.

"We live in a world where there's a lot of people who don't have homes," she says. "And who wants to drive by that in a Lamborghini? You know, I don't like walking by it to get on the train. So it just it creates a much more stark reminder of the inequities, you know, the imbalance in in our world. And you know normally I just walk down the street feeling helpless to help people."

She also tried camping, taekwondo, volunteering and other activities as she searched for deep personal satisfaction. Some became habits.

Jen Lewin's please-touch-the-art approach to public sculpture inspired The Pool. The globe-trotting installation will be on display in Chattanooga April 21-30, and by "on display," I mean that you're invited to jump and dance and boogie all over it and see how it reacts.

The Muse of Fire Project is an opportunity for children from Chattanooga aged between 10 and 13 to write a play for adult actors. The children, mentored by working actors, meet every Monday after school for ten weeks in the Chattanooga Downtown Public Library where they slowly develop their plays. Richard Winham talked to three of the young playwrights as well as three of the actors and mentors who work with them in the project.

The idea for Tennessee author/biologist David George Haskell's new book The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature's Great Connectors came from an almost offhand remark he made while teaching at The University of the South in Sewanne. 

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