Arts & Culture

CBS

Mimi Kennedy was destined for fame; as a child, she wanted to be an actress, and throughout her career, Broadway, the big screen and TV have served her well, making her face familiar to almost everyone. She's also an author and activist, and she's chatting with WUTC about her on- and off-stage roles in life, starting with her portrayal of Jan in both the original Broadway and National Touring productions of Grease.

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Why don't people sing together anymore? During the Civil Rights movement, marchers used songs to bond with each other, but modern protest movements don't necessarily unite the same way. 

Dr. Ysaye Barnwell encourages people to put down their phones and make real-world connections through the power of group singing.

Paula Poundstone

The red Lamborghini did little to improve Paula Poundstone's mood.

She says she was "feeling like a jerk" as she drove it through Los Angeles, a self-inflicted experiment to discover the secret to happiness.

"We live in a world where there's a lot of people who don't have homes," she says. "And who wants to drive by that in a Lamborghini? You know, I don't like walking by it to get on the train. So it just it creates a much more stark reminder of the inequities, you know, the imbalance in in our world. And you know normally I just walk down the street feeling helpless to help people."

She also tried camping, taekwondo, volunteering and other activities as she searched for deep personal satisfaction. Some became habits.

Jen Lewin's please-touch-the-art approach to public sculpture inspired The Pool. The globe-trotting installation will be on display in Chattanooga April 21-30, and by "on display," I mean that you're invited to jump and dance and boogie all over it and see how it reacts.

The Muse of Fire Project is an opportunity for children from Chattanooga aged between 10 and 13 to write a play for adult actors. The children, mentored by working actors, meet every Monday after school for ten weeks in the Chattanooga Downtown Public Library where they slowly develop their plays. Richard Winham talked to three of the young playwrights as well as three of the actors and mentors who work with them in the project.

The idea for Tennessee author/biologist David George Haskell's new book The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature's Great Connectors came from an almost offhand remark he made while teaching at The University of the South in Sewanne. 

When noted playwright Arthur Miller wrote “All My Sons,” he has been quoted as saying it was his “final attempt at writing a commercially successful play.” Had the play not been a success he reportedly said he would “find some other line of work.”

WUTC's Richard Winham speaks with two filmmakers who have documentaries at the 2017 Chattanooga Film Festival.

Michael Rubenstone is a super-fan whose film On The Sly shows him out in search of long-time reclusive funk legend Sly Stone.

The two artists behind Squonk Opera—Steve O’Hearn, who is part visual artist/part construction engineer, and his partner, composer Jackie Dempsey—aim to create work that is “fast, funny, shameless and inclusive.” Richard Winham talked to Steve O’Hearn on the telephone from Pittsburgh, where he and his partner live and work. Also in the studio were Bob Boyer, the director of the Patten Performance Series here at UTC, and Lisa Darger from UTC’s Office of Sustainability.

Listen around 2:50 pm today for Richard Winham's hour-long interview with Eileen Ivers. Tune in to 88.1 FM or listen live online. More information about her performance is on the CSO's Web site.

Michael Gray has been hosting and producing the River City Sessions for several years now. The show is recorded live at Gran Falloon on Main Street and then airs on WUTC on the fourth Sunday of every month at 8 in the evening. River City Sessions is a showcase for storytellers, but as Michael Gray told Richard Winham, that wasn’t clear to him when he first began producing the show.

The next live taping is Thursday, March 9 at 7 pm.

 Dr. Jonathan McNair joins us to discuss "O King," a tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. that will feature music and spoken-word performances. At the event, two new instrumental works by Dr. Jonathan McNair will premiere.

FROM A PRESS RELEASE:

Every year for the past seven years the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Music department has staged a weekend-long Piano Extravaganza. The Extravaganza, a showcase for UTC students and faculty as well as special guests, was conceived and organized by Dr. Sin Sing Tsai. Dr. Tsai passed away recently, but the music department decided to continue with the Piano Extravaganza as a tribute to Dr. Tsai. 

Anna Saffley Houston led a rich life. She was an independent woman in an era when very few women had that option. But she's best remembered for the huge collection of antiques she amassed in her lifetime--now housed  in The Houston Museum in the Bluff View Arts District. Richard Winham talked to Lilly Waters, the outreach coordinator for the museum, about the collection and the life of the singular woman behind it. The museum's annual antiques show/sale runs 2/24 through 2/26.

In 2013, Sybil Baker began working on a book about immigrants and refugees who have resettled in Chattanooga, Tennessee. At the request of people who reviewed early drafts, she began including stories of her own travels, including a "reverse migration" from America to Ankara, and 12 years she spent living in South Korea before moving to the Scenic City and teaching at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

She joins us to talk about Immigration Essays, which also examines Chattanooga as a destination: its legacy of racism, and gentrification affecting the MLK neighborhood downtown.

SPECIAL EVENT: At Star Line Books on 2/15 at 7 pm, she will be celebrating her book launch with special guests George Conley and Earl Braggs.

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