Arts & Culture

2:13pm

Thu March 8, 2012
SYNONYM Art Project

Local Artist Awarded Creative Capital Grant

Phillip Lewis is a UTC professor in the Art Department. He teaches courses in photography and video. Recently, he was awarded the Creative Capital Grant for his ongoing SYNONYM art project. According to Lewis, SYNONYM will explore an experimental drug rehabilitation program that appeared in the United States during the 1980s and 90s. Phillip Lewis talked to WUTC about his upcoming project and being awarded the Creative Capital Grant.

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3:22pm

Tue March 6, 2012
Arts & Culture

Southern Circuit Film Series Features Modern Dance Doc

The latest Southern Tour of Independent Filmmakers screening will feature A Good Man, a documentary about controversial choreographer Bill T. Jones.  Several years ago, the Ravinia Festival asked Jones to create a dance production based on Abraham Lincoln's life.  Documentary filmmakers Gordon Quinn and Bob Hercules spent two years chronicling Jones's creative process.

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1:59pm

Tue March 6, 2012
Up and Coming Writer

Local Writer Sells Short Stories to Grove/Atlantic

Jamie Quatro is a fiction writer who lives on Lookout Mountain. Her first book of short-stories will be published by Grove/Atlantic in 2013. Her work has appeared in Tin House, Ploughshares, and McSweeney’s. Garrett Crowe spoke with Jamie Quatro about becoming a writer, her influences, and rejection. She also reads excerpts from her story “Holy Ground”.

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12:07pm

Mon March 5, 2012
Arts & Culture

New Homes for the Homeless Come with Art

H*ART Gallery on Main Street sells the work of unconventional artists, like homeless people, people with disabilities, and refugees. Now, the gallery is helping put some of that art into the homes of unconventional collectors, too: homeless people who are moving into a new home. Mary Helen Miller spoke with Ellen Heavilon, the executive director of H*ART Gallery, and Jamie McConnico, a seventh grader who helped start the new program.

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11:21am

Wed February 29, 2012
Arts & Culture

'Re: Structure' Exhibit Examines How Humans Interact With Environment

Rylan Steele has created a series of photographs that cause viewers to take a closer look at ordinary workspaces--the clutter and the cleanliness of offices, warehouses and other spaces we inhabit every day but rarely think about.

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12:15pm

Tue February 28, 2012
Local Music Venue

The Camp House Features Local Blend Of Music, Coffee

Tucked away off Main Street, The Camp House is a warehouse that has been converted to a coffee house and music venue.  It features an intimate setting and multi-track recording--in fact the facility, was originally designed to double as a music recording space for the Mission Chattanooga.  Now it's home to a local blend of coffee and different music performances each day of the week. 

2:44pm

Mon February 27, 2012
Flaunt The Font

A Typeface for Chattanooga

Chattanooga is well on its way to becoming the first city in America with its own unique typeface.  Chatype is being developed through the grass-roots efforts of DJ Trischler and Jonathan Mansfield combined with the design creativity of Robbie de Villiers and Jeremy Dooley.  Chatype is currently in beta and when it is complete it will be a gift to the people of Chattanooga.  The hope is that the typeface will be used to help brand and promote the city as well as celebrate the rich history and exciting future.

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2:40pm

Mon February 27, 2012
A Night At The Museum

At This Southside Gallery, Enjoy the Art--From Your Bed

Miki Boni and Tom Paulsin put a lot of work into transforming an old house in the Southside District into a contemporary, comfortable art gallery. Now when visitors come, they hope they’ll enjoy the art and stay awhile. A long while. Maybe overnight or for the weekend.

2:33pm

Mon February 27, 2012
Arts & Culture

Planet Altered’s CAFE Grant Series Helps Teachers, Too

For the last couple of years, the Planet Altered Gallery on Chattanooga’s Southside has held fundraising events called CAFE Grant Suppers.  At these events, people pay $12 for dinner.  During the dinner, artists and creative people who could use extra money to fund their work give pitches.  People listen to the pitches, vote, and then the winning artist receives most of the money people paid for dinner–often several hundred dollars total.  It’s a way for the Southside community to gather, enjoy food and fun, and support a local artist.

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2:01pm

Mon February 27, 2012
When Words Collide

They Might Be Giants’ John Flansburgh vs. Richard Winham

“I don’t ever talk to anybody who’s older than me,” John Flansburgh says in this interview with WUTC 88.1 FM’s Richard Winham.  Both Flansburgh and Winham have been in the music business for decades.  Winham, the host of WUTC’s afternoon music show, started his radio career in 1972.  Flansburgh’s music career began in 1982, when he and John Linnell founded the band They Might Be Giants.  In this extended, informal conversation, Winham doesn’t exactly interview Flansburgh–instead, these two music-industry veterans wind up interviewing each other, comparing their musical tastes and contrastin

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1:58pm

Mon February 27, 2012
Geek Rock

Re: Jonathan Coulton

Jonathan Coulton used to write computer programs.  Now he writes about programmers–his songs like Code Monkey are funny, occasionally melancholy ballads about geek culture: burnt-out code warriors, zombie office workers and mournful, lonely sea monsters.

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1:39pm

Thu February 2, 2012
CLASSIC FILM

Meet The Writer Who Created Groundhog Day

Danny Rubin, an author, teacher and screenwriter, wrote the original screenplay that became the classic 1993 movie Groundhog Day, starring Bill Murray and Andie MacDowell.  In this interview, Rubin discusses how he conceived  of the story’s premise, why he decided to set the story on Groundhog Day and how the script changed when director Harold Ramis got involved.

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1:35pm

Fri January 27, 2012
LOCALLY-PRODUCED AUDIOBOOK

Handed Down: Bringing Appalachian Folk Tales To Life

Some stories are meant to be heard out loud.  Particularly, stories from oral traditions, such as the Jack Tales, which originated in Europe.  Immigrants brought Jack Tales to Appalachia, and more than sixty years ago, folklorist Richard Chase collected these tales and published them in print form.

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1:25pm

Fri January 27, 2012
JUST BUSTED

Chattanooga Resident Transforms Mugshots Into Fine Art

Ron E. Ott finds mugshots taken in Hamilton County, Tennessee, and he renders the photographs into colorful comic-book styled portraits.  He stopped by our studios recently and discussed what inspired him to start using mugshots as the basis for fine art.  He calls his project Chattanooga Mugshots.

3:43pm

Thu January 26, 2012
This Is NPR

Fresh Air Nation

Originally published on Thu January 26, 2012 9:57 am

In case you missed it, Terry Gross was on The Colbert Report last night celebrating her 25th year as host of NPR's Fresh Air. Between laughs, the two talked pregnant pauses and Frebreze, analyzed "snoozville" interviews and discussed Terry's failed teaching career. Congratulations Terry!

See the full episode here.

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