Books

   As part of their South Bound Lectures series, the Southern Lit Alliance is bringing Adrian Matejka to Chattanooga on Wednesday, February 10th.  In this interview, Matejka talks about The Big Smoke, his Pulitzer-nominated (and National Book Award-nominated) collection of poetry about Jack Johnson, the first African-American world heavyweight boxing champion.

  Chattanooga native Janie Dempsey Watts joins us to discuss her new novel Return to Taylor’s Crossing, which explores the lingering effects of racism and violence during the Civil Rights era in North Georgia.  The novel was published in 2015.

  North Georgia author Tim Champlin joins us to discuss his new book The Wild West of Louis L'Amour: An Illustrated Companion to the Frontier Fiction of an American Icon.  The book describes the real places, people and history that inspired L'Amour, who was one of the most prolific, bestselling American authors of all time.

  J.D. Frost is the author of two crime thrillers set in Chattanooga: Dollface and Face2Face.  Both novels feature Chattanooga police detective Moses Palmer as the protagonist, and the books are the first two installments of a planned trilogy.  

Bennett Miller

  In 1998, author Sarah Vowell went on a road trip and followed the Trail of Tears.  Vowell grew up in Oklahoma; her ancestors were Cherokee.  She visited Chattanooga and North Georgia, seeking the trail’s beginnings, then followed it to the West and created an hour-long episode of This American Life about her journey.

The trip changed her.  

  In a new book on Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken,” David Orr, the poetry critic for The New York Times, contends that it’s a poem “everyone loves and almost everyone gets wrong.” WUTC's Richard Winham talked to David Orr about Robert Frost and found that the poet, like his poetry, was almost often misunderstood and, equally, underestimated.  

UPDATE 7/13/15 @ 4:54 p.m:  NPR's Maureen Corrigan has reviewed Harper Lee's new novel Go Set A Watchman, and Corrigan calls it "a mess" and a "a troubling confusion of a novel."  Also, Tonja Carter, the attorney who claims she found the long-lost Watchman manuscript, has written an editorial in The Wall Street Journal discuss

You may have read about an imaginary Southern piece of turf where the past presses on the present with such force that characters find themselves transformed with the pressure of it, where the landscape comes alive, where human beings seem sometimes like gods and sometimes like devils, and the language of the story lights up your mind: William Faulkner's half-historical, half-fabulized Yoknapatawpha County, yes?

History buffs in other parts of the country may know Chattanooga only for its importance during the Civil War.  However, a new book by NPR’s Steve Inskeep recounts a lesser-known regional conflict, and it's a story that deserves to be heard and remembered.

The nation's seventh president was a man of legendary toughness who made his name in America's second war against the British — and he's someone NPR's Steve Inskeep has come to know well: Andrew Jackson.

Business is brisk at the Ole Curiosities and Book Shoppe, a block off the town square in Monroeville, Ala.

Jennifer Brinkley and her friend Leigh Mikovch are at the counter, putting in a pre-order for Go Set a Watchman, the much anticipated forthcoming book from Harper Lee.

"We're big Harper Lee fans and To Kill a Mockingbird fans," Brinkley says.

Both are writers from Bowling Green, Ky. They're visiting Monroeville for the annual Alabama Writers Symposium. Brinkley says it will be meaningful to have the new book come from Lee's hometown.

Hundreds of fans and more than 40 esteemed Southern authors participated in the 2015 Celebration of Southern Literature, hosted by the Southern Lit Alliance at the Tivoli Theatre.  In this segment, we're looking back at a few of the highlights, including a panel discussion about adapting books to with with Charles Frazier, Ron Rash and Allan Gurganus and Chris Dortch; a musical performance from Clyde Edgerton & The Rank Strangers; and a poetry reading from Terran

This is part of a series of interviews conducted with writers who will attend the 2015 Celebration of Southern Literature April 16-18.  (Previously, WUTC has interviewed Jill McCorkle, Ron Rash, Andrew Hudgins

This is part of a series of interviews conducted with writers who will attend the 2015 Celebration of Southern Literature April 16-18.  (Previously, WUTC has interviewed Jill McCorkle, Ron Rash and several others.)  More than 40 writers will be at the Celebration, taking part in discussion panels and other events, as well as meeting fans and signing autographs.  The public is invited.  The schedule and ticket information can be found here.

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