Books

The idea for Tennessee author/biologist David George Haskell's new book The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature's Great Connectors came from an almost offhand remark he made while teaching at The University of the South in Sewanne. 

In 2013, Sybil Baker began working on a book about immigrants and refugees who have resettled in Chattanooga, Tennessee. At the request of people who reviewed early drafts, she began including stories of her own travels, including a "reverse migration" from America to Ankara, and 12 years she spent living in South Korea before moving to the Scenic City and teaching at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

She joins us to talk about Immigration Essays, which also examines Chattanooga as a destination: its legacy of racism, and gentrification affecting the MLK neighborhood downtown.

SPECIAL EVENT: At Star Line Books on 2/15 at 7 pm, she will be celebrating her book launch with special guests George Conley and Earl Braggs.

Utopian communities don't fare much better in fiction than they do in real life. As the plot usually unfolds, a brave new world loses its luster fast when the failings of its founder are exposed, or when the community itself begins to morph into a cult.

Practically on a whim, Joan Kroc made the biggest public radio pledge in history: around $250 million dollars to NPR. 

She could afford it. Her husband was McDonald's corporation founder Ray Kroc, and Ray and Joan were worth billions. Ray's life was well-publicized, most recently in the Michael Keaton film The Founder.

That film is based on a true story.

Copyright Rayon Richards

Chattanooga State received a $15,000 NEA Big Read Grant in 2016 to support a citywide reading project, and the first chapter begins Thursday.

Comics Draw On Chattanooga Landmarks

Dec 19, 2016
Tara Hamilton

Chattanooga is the muse for the Chatt Comix Co-op’s first Anthology, which is Chattanooga themed. The anthology features local landmarks sketched by a wide array of local artists.    

Producer Jacqui Helbert speaks with Tara Hamilton and Meagan Frey, who started the Chatt Comix Co-Op, and drops in on one of their meetings. She discovers it isn’t just fanboys who nerd out over comic books.

More information about the Co-Op can be found on Facebook .  The Co-Op meets on the first and third Thursday every month. 

Hugh Hamrick

When he's not writing bestselling books like When You Are Engulfed in Flames and Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls, or reading essays on NPR, David Sedaris is walking alongside roads in England, picking up cans and candy bar wrappers and trash. Nobody asks him to do it, and nobody pays him--he's simply obsessed with picking up litter. In this interview, he explains how that obsession inspired the title of his next book, Theft By Finding. 

  The first Chattanooga Readers and wRiters Fair hosted by The City of Chattanooga will be in Chattanooga’s City Hall on 11th street this Saturday, August 27th, from 10 until 3. The fair will include several panels including one on Creative Non-Fiction. Richard Winham talked to one of the writers on that panel, Linda Murray Bullard.

  

Harrison Scott Key's debut memoir The World's Largest Man is the funniest book I've read all year. Throughout his rural Mississippi childhood, he tried to make his father happy by accompanying the man on hunting trips and to other outdoor activities. But Key was more interested in reading than in hunting, and he and his father never seemed to understand him.

  Bob Boilen, the host and producer for NPR’s All Songs Considered as well as the popular Tiny Desk Concerts, has put together Your Song Changed My Life, a printed collection of some of the many interviews he has conducted with musicians in the nearly thirty years he has worked at NPR. He talked to WUTC's Richard Winham.

  Claire Vaye Watkins won two major literary prizes for her 2012 debut Battleborn, a collection of short stories rich with details of desert life in her home state of Nevada.

    Dr. Rhea Seddon joins us to talk about what it was like to be one of NASA's first female astronauts. A Murfreesboro, Tennessee native, she was a medical resident who applied to NASA on a whim after hearing the organization was searching for women to join the space program. She was accepted, launched into orbit to conduct medical experiments, and found a family; she and her husband Hoot Gibson were the first married astronaut couple, and Dr. Seddon gave birth to the world's first "astrotot."

   Former NPR journalist Barbara Bradley Hagerty joins us to talk about the myths and mystery of midlife: how prevalent is the so-called "midlife crisis," really? What can you do to ensure midlife is the best part of your life, even when facing job loss, divorce or other disruptive events? What factor is the biggest predictor of happiness in midlife? She researched all these topics for her latest book, Life Reimagined: The Science, Art, and Opportunity of Midlife.

  You may remember James Mahon as the Irish reporter who used to be on WDEF, Chattanooga's News Channel 12.  Mahon's first book, Through Irish Eyes, chronicles his journey from an adoptee from communist Romania to being an Irish newsman in the Scenic City and more.

Here's an excerpt from his LinkedIn page:

Emma Bell Miles lived on Walden's Ridge in the early 20th century, writing about nature, Appalachian culture, and the hardships women faced in mountain life.  The new collection The Common Lot and Other Stories is a compilation of her short fiction.

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