In a new book on Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken,” David Orr, the poetry critic for The New York Times, contends that it’s a poem “everyone loves and almost everyone gets wrong.” WUTC's Richard Winham talked to David Orr about Robert Frost and found that the poet, like his poetry, was almost often misunderstood and, equally, underestimated.  

UPDATE 7/13/15 @ 4:54 p.m:  NPR's Maureen Corrigan has reviewed Harper Lee's new novel Go Set A Watchman, and Corrigan calls it "a mess" and a "a troubling confusion of a novel."  Also, Tonja Carter, the attorney who claims she found the long-lost Watchman manuscript, has written an editorial in The Wall Street Journal discuss

You may have read about an imaginary Southern piece of turf where the past presses on the present with such force that characters find themselves transformed with the pressure of it, where the landscape comes alive, where human beings seem sometimes like gods and sometimes like devils, and the language of the story lights up your mind: William Faulkner's half-historical, half-fabulized Yoknapatawpha County, yes?

History buffs in other parts of the country may know Chattanooga only for its importance during the Civil War.  However, a new book by NPR’s Steve Inskeep recounts a lesser-known regional conflict, and it's a story that deserves to be heard and remembered.

The nation's seventh president was a man of legendary toughness who made his name in America's second war against the British — and he's someone NPR's Steve Inskeep has come to know well: Andrew Jackson.

Business is brisk at the Ole Curiosities and Book Shoppe, a block off the town square in Monroeville, Ala.

Jennifer Brinkley and her friend Leigh Mikovch are at the counter, putting in a pre-order for Go Set a Watchman, the much anticipated forthcoming book from Harper Lee.

"We're big Harper Lee fans and To Kill a Mockingbird fans," Brinkley says.

Both are writers from Bowling Green, Ky. They're visiting Monroeville for the annual Alabama Writers Symposium. Brinkley says it will be meaningful to have the new book come from Lee's hometown.

Hundreds of fans and more than 40 esteemed Southern authors participated in the 2015 Celebration of Southern Literature, hosted by the Southern Lit Alliance at the Tivoli Theatre.  In this segment, we're looking back at a few of the highlights, including a panel discussion about adapting books to with with Charles Frazier, Ron Rash and Allan Gurganus and Chris Dortch; a musical performance from Clyde Edgerton & The Rank Strangers; and a poetry reading from Terran

This is part of a series of interviews conducted with writers who will attend the 2015 Celebration of Southern Literature April 16-18.  (Previously, WUTC has interviewed Jill McCorkle, Ron Rash, Andrew Hudgins

This is part of a series of interviews conducted with writers who will attend the 2015 Celebration of Southern Literature April 16-18.  (Previously, WUTC has interviewed Jill McCorkle, Ron Rash and several others.)  More than 40 writers will be at the Celebration, taking part in discussion panels and other events, as well as meeting fans and signing autographs.  The public is invited.  The schedule and ticket information can be found here.

"I do believe there is a kind of good death," Jill McCorkle says in this interview.  Her most recent novel, Life After Life, addresses a subject many people find uncomfortable--conversations about death.  (The novel was initially inspired by her own father's passing, and she spent more than a decade working on this book.)  Set in a North Carolina retirement home, the novel is written from multiple points of view, and it contrasts the way the dyi

Coleman Barks is a poet, but he is best known both in the English-speaking world and the Middle East for his “translations” of the poetry written by the 12th century Persian poet, Rumi. Barks does not speak or read Persian so his work is not a literal translation, but rather a poetic re-working of literal translations by Islamic scholars.

Richard Louv joins us.  He's the keynote speaker at the Trails & Trilliums Festival taking place in Sewanee April 10 - 12.  He's also the author of eight books, including Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder and The Nature Principle: Reconnecting with Life in a Virtual Age.  Louv is also the co-founder and Chairman Emeritus of the Children & Nature Network.

From the Trails & Trilliums Web site:

Keynote Talk: "The Nature Rich Life"

Louv will present a keynote talk and book signing during Wine & Wildflowers, Saturday, April 11 at 6:00 in the Assembly Auditorium. Tickets for the wine and cheese reception and the talk are $20 a person, payable at the door or online. Following his talk, there will be a chance to purchase and get autographs in copies of the brand new 10th Anniversary Edition of Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder.

Read more about the 3-day festival at

Contributed/Ulf Andersen

Throughout the next few weeks, WUTC will interview authors coming to Chattanooga April 16th - 18th for the 2015 Celebration of Southern Literature.  Today Ron Rash joins us.  Rash is an acclaimed author of poetry, short stories and novels; much of his fiction takes place in North Carolina, where he grew up and continues to reside.

D'aron Davenport feels like a catfish out of his pond when he leaves his Georgia town of about 700 people to go to school in Berkeley, Calif. But within just a few months, it's his hometown that becomes a little hard to understand in his own, changed eyes.

As second novels go, this one should prove a doozy. More than five decades after Harper Lee published her first — and, so far, only — novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee's publisher has announced that she plans to release a new one. The book, currently titled Go Set a Watchman, will be published July 14.