Books

"I do believe there is a kind of good death," Jill McCorkle says in this interview.  Her most recent novel, Life After Life, addresses a subject many people find uncomfortable--conversations about death.  (The novel was initially inspired by her own father's passing, and she spent more than a decade working on this book.)  Set in a North Carolina retirement home, the novel is written from multiple points of view, and it contrasts the way the dyi

Coleman Barks is a poet, but he is best known both in the English-speaking world and the Middle East for his “translations” of the poetry written by the 12th century Persian poet, Rumi. Barks does not speak or read Persian so his work is not a literal translation, but rather a poetic re-working of literal translations by Islamic scholars.

Richard Louv joins us.  He's the keynote speaker at the Trails & Trilliums Festival taking place in Sewanee April 10 - 12.  He's also the author of eight books, including Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder and The Nature Principle: Reconnecting with Life in a Virtual Age.  Louv is also the co-founder and Chairman Emeritus of the Children & Nature Network.

From the Trails & Trilliums Web site:

Keynote Talk: "The Nature Rich Life"

Louv will present a keynote talk and book signing during Wine & Wildflowers, Saturday, April 11 at 6:00 in the Assembly Auditorium. Tickets for the wine and cheese reception and the talk are $20 a person, payable at the door or online. Following his talk, there will be a chance to purchase and get autographs in copies of the brand new 10th Anniversary Edition of Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder.

Read more about the 3-day festival at Nooga.com.

Contributed/Ulf Andersen

Throughout the next few weeks, WUTC will interview authors coming to Chattanooga April 16th - 18th for the 2015 Celebration of Southern Literature.  Today Ron Rash joins us.  Rash is an acclaimed author of poetry, short stories and novels; much of his fiction takes place in North Carolina, where he grew up and continues to reside.

D'aron Davenport feels like a catfish out of his pond when he leaves his Georgia town of about 700 people to go to school in Berkeley, Calif. But within just a few months, it's his hometown that becomes a little hard to understand in his own, changed eyes.

As second novels go, this one should prove a doozy. More than five decades after Harper Lee published her first — and, so far, only — novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee's publisher has announced that she plans to release a new one. The book, currently titled Go Set a Watchman, will be published July 14.

Low-Key, Real-Life Heroism In 'March: Book Two'

Feb 2, 2015

Some media are custom-made for heroes. Ava DuVernay's gripping film Selma gains much of its drama from the beauty — physical and metaphysical — of David Oyelowo's portrayal of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Oyelowo's incredible voice gives practically everything King says the compelling force of a sermon, and his physical presence — strangely small and economical of motion — is as unique as it is potent.

In this version of Chattanooga, monsters hide beneath the streets and in lurk dark corners.

Shane Berryhill’s Bad Mojo features vampires—called “vipers” by the locals—who dwell in underground Chattanooga.  Zombies attack people in alleys near the Terminal Brewhouse.  Legendary dive bar the Stone Lion is still open for business, an enchanted, magically-protected haven for humans and supernatural creatures alike.

Project Keepsake is both a book and a Web site that collects stories about special objects--family heirlooms, old cookware, antique musical instruments, toys and other things people save.  Dozens of area writers, both professionals and amateurs, have participated in the project.  Many of the stories are poignant tales about significant life events or family members who have passed on. 

The book contains 55 stories, many from members of the Chattanooga Writers' Guild.

Pulitzer-Prize winning historian James M. McPherson joins us to discuss his new book Embattled Rebel: Jefferson Davis as Commander in Chief, which re-examines the legacy of Confederate President Jefferson Davis.  In this extended interview, McPherson also talks about historical preservation and the Chickamauga & Chattanooga National Military Park.

From the publisher:

John Dos Passos Coggin joins us today.  Coggin is an author and political strategist, and he's written a biography, Walkin’ Lawton, about Lawton Chiles, who was one of Florida’s most beloved politicians.  As a candidate, Chiles walked across the Sunshine State and earned his nickname.  In this interview, we discuss why so many Floridians loved Chiles.

Halloween is a day for ghost stories, but if you're a skeptic, don't fret. As the late Alabama storyteller Kathryn Tucker Windham assured her listeners, tales of restless spirits are for everybody.

"I collect ghost stories," Windham said. "Now, the nice thing about ghost stories is that you don't have to believe in ghosts to enjoy hearing a good ghost story."

Kerry Howley teaches creative nonfiction at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and she’s written articles and essays for The New York Times Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, Reason and The Atlantic.  Her debut book, Thrown, is literary nonfiction about mixed martial arts fighting, philosophy and a search for transcendence.

Over 5,000 Americans have died fighting in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. And, over the past 12 years, more than 2,000 soldiers have committed suicide.

One military family experienced both of those horrors — losing one son in combat and one to suicide. Journalist Yochi Dreazen's new book, The Invisible Front: Love And Loss In An Era of Endless War, tells the true story of the Graham family and two events that would forever change the very fabric of their world.

Tom Kanon joins us to discuss two intertwined, oft-overlooked military conflicts: The War of 1812 and the Creek War.  Kanon is an author and an archivist for the Tennessee State Library in Nashville.  His new book is Tennesseans at War, 1812–1815: Andrew Jackson, The Creek War, And The Battle of New Orleans.

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