What is a book? Most of us would have a ready answer for that question, but Chattanooga artist Bob Dombrowski wants to complicate it. In the past thirty years he has created more than 100 “artist books.” Simply put, an artist’s book is whatever the artist decides it is.

MEET THE AUTHOR: Bill Dedman will be in Chattanooga on Tuesday, March 11th to sign books and give a presentation at the Chattanooga Writer’s Guild Meeting.  The event is free and open to the public, and will take place 6:30pm – 8pm at the Chattanooga Public Library downtown.

Richard Glinka

For three decades, Frank Tavares was one of the most-heard voices on NPR stations.  He’s the one who voiced NPR’s underwriting credits—those short “Support comes from….” statements that appear during shows like Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Six months before her wedding, Kjerstin Gruys decided to do something that surprised her friends and family: she vowed to quit looking at herself in the mirror.  For a year, she avoided her own reflection… and even on her wedding day, getting ready, she wouldn’t look at herself.  By avoiding her reflection, she challenged her ideas and society's ideas about beauty.

She blogged about the experience, which garnered national attention, and then wrote a book.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the publication of Jerry Ellis’ first book, Walking the Trail: One Man’s Journey Along the Cherokee Trail of Tears. He’s written eight more books since then, all largely autobiographical, inspired by his adventures walking and hitchhiking across the country.

“Ninety percent of our existence is tangents. So tangents are actually the real plot. But even more importantly, if you avoid a tangent you normally would have taken, you could create a rip in the quantum fabric of the universe”.  –Serge Storms

Charles McNair's first novel, Land O' Goshen, was published in 1994 and nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.  McNair spent nearly two decades writing and rewriting his next book, Pickett's Charge.

Nominated for a 2014 Townsend Prize for Fiction, Pickett's Charge is the story of 114-year-old Civil War veteran Threadgill Pickett, who escapes from an Alabama nursing home and embarks on a wild, absurd, tragic quest for vengeance.

UPDATE: Due to inclement weather, Cline's lecture at Dalton State College on 1/30 has been canceled and will be rescheduled.

Campus Party Brasil / Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike

Dr. Michio Kaku’s new book The Future Of The Mind: The Scientific Quest To Understand, Enhance, And Empower The Mind will be released in February.   He’ll visit the Chattanooga State Community College campus on January 23rd to give Scenic City residents a preview of his new book.

In the time she’s been living in Chattanooga, Janis Hashe has established a reputation as a theatrical director—she established a repertory company, Shakespeare Chattanooga, that has successfully presented a number of plays. She has worked as an editor for the local weekly, The Pulse. She’s  taught classes on theatre at Chattanooga State, as well as leading informal seminars on among others, Oscar Wilde and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, in a local teashop. And now she's  published a novel.

Carolyn Ross Johnston edited Voices of Cherokee Women, which recounts hundreds of years of Cherokee history through primary documents such as letters, diary entries, oral history transcriptions and newspaper articles.  These documents vividly demonstrate how events such as the arrival of European missionaries, the Trail of Tears and the Civil War affected Cherokee women.

Linda Murray Bullard

Linda Murray Bullard, a teenage mother in the 1970's, learned to make choices that would set her life on a positive course of improvement. 

Christian J. Collier, a Chattanooga poet/musician, knows how to wow a crowd—he’s been invited to poetry slams in Atlanta and Nashville, and he hosts a local performance series, The Speakeasy.

In the relatively short time she has been in Chattanooga, Janis Hashe has realized several of her goals, including establishing a repertory company that has presented a number of Shakespeare's plays in a variety of locations such as Coolidge Park and Grace Episcopal Church. She also works as an editor for local weekly The Pulse, and teaches classes on theater at Chattanooga State. But one goal has eluded her for a long time.

Dr. Kathryn Primm, a veterinarian who owns Applebrook Animal Hospital in Ooltewah, has written a memoir.  It's a collection of short, true stories about her four-legged patients and the people who love them.  Tennessee Tails: Pets and Their People is available from Amazon.  Proceeds from the book's first year of sales will benefit the Chattanooga Humane Society and the Pet Placement Center.