Books

Random House recently published a new novel from Southern author (and Chattanooga resident) Susan Gregg Gilmore. She won acclaim for her first two novels, Looking for Salvation at the Dairy Queen and The Improper Life of Bezellia Grove.   The Funeral Dress is inspired by real seamstresses who worked at a Dunlap shirt factory in the 1970s.

Publisher's Weekly named The Color of Christ as one of the best religion books of 2012.  

 The imprint is called Tennessee Noir.

Photographer/pilot Ron Lowery has taken aerial photos of the Tennessee River from the Appalachian Mountains to Paducah, Kentucky. He is seeking Kickstarter support to publish a coffee table book, Tennessee River:  Sparkling Gem Of The South. 

Becky Wooley's Grit and Grace mystery novels feature amateur detectives Grit Griffin and Grace Willis, two churchgoing sleuths whose cases are often entangled with church drama and theological questions.

Murder, Intelligently Designed is the second book in the series,  a clerical crime novel that combines questions about faith and science with a whodunit plot.

Becky Wooley lives in Chattanooga, and is a minister's wife and former church secretary.   

Chattanooga, Tennessee author Shane Berryhill and Waynesville, North Carolina artist James E. Lyle collaborated to create Game of Horror, a graphic novel described as "The Hunger Games meets classic monster cinema in an action-packed tale of terror."

In the story, an undead girl named Lily fights ghouls in a combat tournament, and the tale is meant as an allegory for human trafficking.  The creators are seeking Kickstarter funds to publish the graphic novel.

Kent Whitaker, a culinary author who lives in Chattanooga, Tennessee, has collected dozens of anecdotes, historical facts, humorous stories and first-person accounts in his new book Bullets and Bread: The Story of the Sacrifice in American Homes to Feed Troops in World War II.  He joins WUTC for an interview.

Akashic Books

Ian Svenonius is a singer who fronted  Weird War, The Make-Up, The Nation of Ulysses and other Washington, D.C. hardcore and indie groups. Yet he claims his book Supernatural Strategies for Making a Rock ‘n’ Roll Group doesn't draw on his own personal knowledge. Instead, the book contains advice from the Great Beyond. Ghosts communicate with him in bizarre ways, such as tossing spaghetti against a wall, and share unconventional, Marxist interpretations of popular music's evolution. In this interview, Svenonius and WUTC's Michael Edward Miller talk about the book (and play and discuss several of his songs.)

Homesteading dates back to the pioneer days (remember Little House On The Prairie?), when families grew much of their own food on their own land.  In the modern version, homesteaders avoid grocery stores by planting backyard gardens and raising pigs, rabbits and other animals for meat.  In this segment, WUTC visits Monica and Byron DeLoach, homesteaders who live in North Georgia.

Oscar Hank Will, author of Plowing with Pigs and Other Creative, Low-Budget Homesteading Solutions, also joins in the conversation.

© 2007 Larry D. Moore CC BY-SA 3.0.

Roy Blount, Jr. is a prolific Southern author and a panelist on NPR’s Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me!  Often funny, occasionally cantankerous, he joins WUTC’s Michael Edward Miller for a loose, meandering chat.  Blount discusses his books, being a Southern expat and participating in the Celebration Of Southern Literature.

Ian Svenonius is coming to the Winder Binder Gallery & Bookstore in downtown Chattanooga on Friday, May 10th, to promote his book Supernatural Strategies for Making a Rock ‘n’ Roll Group.  The book is a music-industry satire.  The publisher says, “Pretending to be a ‘how-to" guide for aspiring rock stars, this book fuses a meticulously researched sociopolitical examination of the history of rock and roll music with the author's trademark humor and cutting wit.”

In this interview, celebrated Southern author Dorothy Allison looks back on her novel Bastard Out Of Carolina, which was published more than twenty years ago (and was nominated for a National Book Award).  Readers discover (or re-discover) it every year--it’s both wildly humorous and shockingly brutal.  In this interview, Allison talks about using her own family legends as source material.  Allison also talks about leaving the South, teaching young writers, and discusses her long-in-progress new novel She Who.

Kentucky native Maurice Manning is in Chattanooga for the Celebration of Southern Literature (April 17 – 20), where he was inducted into the prestigious Fellowship of Southern Authors.  In this segment, Manning reads a selection from his new yet-to-be published book, talks about working Southern characters and narratives into his poems, and explains why he never met another living poet until he was in college.

Memphis native Katori Hall is an actress, writer and playwright.  She's won numerous awards, and her play The Mountaintop ran on Broadway, starring Samuel L. Jackson and Angela Bassett.  Katori Hall is in Chattanooga for the Celebration of Southern Literature, which takes place April 17th, 18th and 19th.  In this interview, Hall discusses how The Mountaintop humanizes Martin Luther King, Jr., how she joined the Fellowship of Southern Writers, and what she'll be doing at the Celebration.

This biennial literary gathering used to be called the Conference On Southern Literature.  It draws major Southern authors.  But it's also open to fans--in fact, fans have always been welcome to attend.  This year, organizers have changed the event's name to the Celebration of Southern Literature to emphasize that the public is welcome.  Executive Director Susan Robinson expects the event to draw more than forty authors and a thousand fans to the Tivoli in Chattanooga.

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