Chattanooga

Three years ago, Jennifer Holder and Shawanda Mason Moore had $100 and a dream of bringing people together across the city. They started The Chattery, a nonprofit that offers classes in practically any subject someone is willing to teach. (Recently, Sean Phipps gave a short course on how to smoke a pipe properly.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

A Chattanooga physician says the Affordable Care Act saved her life, and she’s challenging claims that the Senate can replace Obamacare with something better.

She’s the founder of the Chattanooga Sports Institute Center for Health, and an athlete who has finished seven Ironman competitions. But a sudden diagnosis slowed her down.

"Two and a half years ago," she says, "I was diagnosed with a very devastating, incurable, chronic vascular disease. I lost, almost lost my entire right leg to that. And now I’ve won the lottery of pre-existing conditions."

This summer the Signal Mountain Playhouse is mounting a production of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Many community theater groups may have found just building the sets for this show to be more than they wanted to handle, but the Signal Mountain Playhouse has a group of set designers who relish a challenge. Last summer they built a flying car for Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. This year they’ve built Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory.

For the past decade green|spaces, a non-profit company formed in 2007, has been trying to change the way Chattanoogans think about energy and energy consumption. Richard Winham talked to Dawn Hjelseth about the evolution of the company from its original role as a cheerleader to its current role as a developer of energy efficient housing in Chattanooga.

CBS

Mimi Kennedy was destined for fame; as a child, she wanted to be an actress, and throughout her career, Broadway, the big screen and TV have served her well, making her face familiar to almost everyone. She's also an author and activist, and she's chatting with WUTC about her on- and off-stage roles in life, starting with her portrayal of Jan in both the original Broadway and National Touring productions of Grease.

Ashley Evans, Executive Director of the free health clinic Volunteers In Medicine, joins us to talk about a CVS Health Foundation Grant the clinic recently received to tackle a significant local health problem: diabetes. Also, we talk about the clinic's 2nd Annual Run for Health at Camp Jordan on June 3rd.

FROM A MEDIA RELEASE:

YouTube

Why don't people sing together anymore? During the Civil Rights movement, marchers used songs to bond with each other, but modern protest movements don't necessarily unite the same way. 

Dr. Ysaye Barnwell encourages people to put down their phones and make real-world connections through the power of group singing.

Jen Lewin's please-touch-the-art approach to public sculpture inspired The Pool. The globe-trotting installation will be on display in Chattanooga April 21-30, and by "on display," I mean that you're invited to jump and dance and boogie all over it and see how it reacts.

WUTC's Spring Membership Drive continues today, and when you donate, you could win an invite to a VIP meet-and-greet Friday with Paula Poundstone. She's performing at Track 29 in Chattanooga. Tune in to 88.1 for details.

The Muse of Fire Project is an opportunity for children from Chattanooga aged between 10 and 13 to write a play for adult actors. The children, mentored by working actors, meet every Monday after school for ten weeks in the Chattanooga Downtown Public Library where they slowly develop their plays. Richard Winham talked to three of the young playwrights as well as three of the actors and mentors who work with them in the project.

Songbirds Guitar Museum is located in the Chattanooga Choo Choo complex, with more than 550 acoustic and electric guitars on display. If you’re a Beatles fan, you’ll see examples of the band's favorite Rickenbacker and Gretsch models. Rows of glass cases also show off rare Fender prototype Telecasters, and Martin acoustics from the 1930s and 40s.

At Chattanooga’s Walnut Street Bridge, a new memorial could ensure an old injustice is never forgotten.

The bright blue bridge is usually a place for recreation, with men and women jogging, couples holding hands, and a scenic view beyond the handrails. Tourism officials tout the landmark as the world’s longest pedestrian bridge. It may be the Chattanooga's most iconic landmark, second only to the Choo Choo.

It can also be a somber place.

 

 Bra-Vo! Is billed as “fashion show celebrating life after cancer.” It is a celebration, but it’s also an essential fundraiser for Breast Cancer Support Services (BCSS) here in Chattanooga. BCSS offers spiritual, emotional and financial support for men, women and their families living under the shadow of breast cancer.

Since launching in 2014, the annual Chattanooga Film Festival has become a major event, featuring dozens and dozens of feature films and shorts, as well as secret screenings, discussion panels, and parties. Last year's event drew a crowd of more than 10,500 people.

This year's festival kicks off April 6th and lasts through the 9th. The full schedule is now online.

Festival founder Chris Dortch and his father (also named Chris Dortch) join us to preview this year's event.

Pages