local food

From 2010 to 2013, the nonprofit group Gaining Ground took the lead in growing Chattanooga's local food scene.  But their $1.65 million in grant money ran out, so a new group,  Harvested Here, now helps local farmers get their products into Chattanooga's restaurants and stores.  Whitney Marks, the sales and marketing director for Harvested Here, joins us to explain exactly what they do.

East Chattanooga is a “food desert.” There aren’t any supermarkets in the neighborhood, and many of the people live on processed foods from fast food restaurants and convenience markets. Joel Tippens is part of a group called Fair Share Urban Growers. The group has begun developing what they’re calling an “urban farm” on Roanoke Avenue, across the street from the recently closed Harriet Tubman Housing Project. Their goal is to teach a new generation how to grow their own food.

Homesteading dates back to the pioneer days (remember Little House On The Prairie?), when families grew much of their own food on their own land.  In the modern version, homesteaders avoid grocery stores by planting backyard gardens and raising pigs, rabbits and other animals for meat.  In this segment, WUTC visits Monica and Byron DeLoach, homesteaders who live in North Georgia.

Oscar Hank Will, author of Plowing with Pigs and Other Creative, Low-Budget Homesteading Solutions, also joins in the conversation.

Main Street Farmers Market

Chattanooga has a variety of farmers markets where you can purchase fresh produce and local food products directly from the producers.