NPR

  Today, as results come in across the country, NPR and reporters will be updating this breaking news blog in real time. The NPR Politics team, along with WUTC reporters, will be providing live updates in the form of photo, video, commentary and analysis for both national and local contested races.

As you scroll through the live blog, come back to the top of the blog to populate new stories that have been posted since you’ve visited the page. Get a more in-depth look at each one of these races by clicking the “View Results” link in the top right of the blog.

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate Wednesday night at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

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In The Hidden Brain, NPR's Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to unearth patterns, biases, and triggers that drive human behavior. He is speaking with us about the new season of the podcast and what illuminating topics listeners can anticipate. The new season includes a series exploring issues on the minds of voters during the political season; specifically, a nuanced and surprising discussion about immigration and how immigrants who've been settled in the United States for twenty years can be wary of new comers.

Guy Raz hosts two popular NPR podcasts: the TED Radio Hour, which launched in 2012, and How I Built This, a new one focusing on entrepreneurship. Both are very high on the iTunes charts right now. He joins us to explain why he started this new one, some of his favorite podcasts, and why he believes NPR produces so many of the best podcasts.  

  Kelly McEvers says her new podcast Embedded is unique because it's a news podcast. "We take a story from the news, and we go deep," she says in this interview. "I'm in the soup of news every day." (As regular listeners know, she's also one of the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered.)

In an NPR news planning meeting, when something particularly interesting sticks out, she wants to learn more--to explore the "how" and "why" behind an event.

  Bob Boilen, the host and producer for NPR’s All Songs Considered as well as the popular Tiny Desk Concerts, has put together Your Song Changed My Life, a printed collection of some of the many interviews he has conducted with musicians in the nearly thirty years he has worked at NPR. He talked to WUTC's Richard Winham.

   Former NPR journalist Barbara Bradley Hagerty joins us to talk about the myths and mystery of midlife: how prevalent is the so-called "midlife crisis," really? What can you do to ensure midlife is the best part of your life, even when facing job loss, divorce or other disruptive events? What factor is the biggest predictor of happiness in midlife? She researched all these topics for her latest book, Life Reimagined: The Science, Art, and Opportunity of Midlife.

Meg Vogel/NPR

  Today, Bob Boilen is best known as the creator and co-host of the NPR podcast All Songs Considered, but he started his NPR career working with the news reporters and hosts—for 18 years, he directed the flagship show All Things Considered. 

In this interview, he tells us how the small music clips between news stories led to the creation of his music show.  We also talk about his voracious appetite for live music—in 2015, he saw 506 shows.  And we discuss NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert Contest, and he gives some tips for bands who are entering.

True to its spirit of music discovery, NPR Music is kicking off 2016 with an invite to unsigned artists of all genres: Show us why you should perform in NPR Music’s Tiny Desk Concert series. The winner will secure a spot at the iconic performance space and a U.S. tour with NPR Music.

Bands and musicians can submit original video entries to the NPR Music’s Tiny Desk Contest Jan. 12-Feb. 2, 2016 at npr.org/tinydeskcontest (see rules for entry).

History buffs in other parts of the country may know Chattanooga only for its importance during the Civil War.  However, a new book by NPR’s Steve Inskeep recounts a lesser-known regional conflict, and it's a story that deserves to be heard and remembered.

In December, the president of the University of Alabama at Birmingham shocked people in the state's largest city when he canceled the football program, saying it wasn't economically feasible.

Only 17 of 54 of Alabama's rural counties have hospitals that offer obstetrics services. It's one of the state's greatest healthcare challenges. NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates speaks with journalist Anna Claire Vollers of AL.com and Dale Quinney of the Alabama Rural Health Association.

Steve Inskeep is best known as the host of NPR's Morning Edition, but he's also an author.  His new work of nonfiction is JACKSONLAND: President Andrew Jackson, Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab.   It centers on Jackson and Ross's twenty-year battle over ownership of Cherokee lands, a battle that "seems at once distant and familiar," according to the publisher.

Richard Glinka

For three decades, Frank Tavares was one of the most-heard voices on NPR stations.  He’s the one who voiced NPR’s underwriting credits—those short “Support comes from….” statements that appear during shows like Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

© 2007 Larry D. Moore CC BY-SA 3.0.

Roy Blount, Jr. is a prolific Southern author and a panelist on NPR’s Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me!  Often funny, occasionally cantankerous, he joins WUTC’s Michael Edward Miller for a loose, meandering chat.  Blount discusses his books, being a Southern expat and participating in the Celebration Of Southern Literature.

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